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Women

Women’s experience as settlers, mothers, leaders, miners’ wives, elderly, teachers, missionaries; family role and gender studies; Mother Jones and other significant figures; artists and entrepreneurs; stereotypes.

Adams, Carolyn Hazlett.  1999.  “Aunt Molly Jackson: The Benefits and the Costs of Cussedness.”  Appalachian Journal 26 (Spring): 264-273.  Review essay of Pistol Packin’ Mama: Aunt Molly Jackson and the Politics of Folksong, by Shelly Romalis (University of Illinois Press, 1999).

Alghrary, Becky I.  2002.  Mountain Magnolias: Women of Avery [Avery Co., N.C.; portraits of 14 mountain women; spans 100 years].  Banner Elk, N.C.: Puddingstone Press.  144 pp.

Allen, Nancy Kelly.  2008.  Ring the Silver Bell.  Louisville, Ky.: MotesBooks.  71 pp.  Adolescent literature; story of Alice Stone (b. 1904), Caney Creek, Ky., and her heroic quest for an education.

Anderson, Cynthia D., and Michael D. Schulman.  1999.  “Women, Restructuring, and Textiles: The Increasing Complexity of Subordination and Struggle in a Southern Community” [Fieldcrest Cannon; Kannapolis, N.C.].  In Neither Separate Nor Equal: Women, Race, and Class in the South, ed. B. Smith, 91-108.  Women in the Political Economy series.  Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Anglin, Mary K.  1995.  “Lives on the Margin: Rediscovering the Women of Antebellum Western North Carolina.”  In Appalachia in the Making: The Mountain South in the Nineteenth Century, ed. M. Pudup, D. Billings, and A. Waller, 185-209.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Anglin, Mary K.  1998.  “Looking Beyond the Factory: Regional Culture and Practices of Dissent” [N.C.; women; Moth Hill Mica Co.].  In More Than Class: Studying Power in U.S. Workplaces, ed. A. Kingsolver, 53-72.  Albany: State University of New York Press.

Anglin, Mary K.  2002.  Women, Power, and Dissent in the Hills of Carolina [N.C.; mica plant; women, labor, and resistance].  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.  168 pp.

Anglin, Mary.  2000.  “Toward a Workable Past: Dangerous Memories and Feminist Perspectives.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 6 no. 1-2 (Spring/Fall): 71-99.

Ansley, Fran, and Susan Williams.  1999.  “Southern Women and Southern Borders on the Move: Tennessee Workers Explore the New International Division of Labor” [U.S.-Mexico exchanges].  In Neither Separate Nor Equal: Women, Race, and Class in the South, ed. B. Smith, 207-244.  Women in the Political Economy series.  Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Appelt, Kathi, and Jeanne Cannella Schmitzer.  2001.  Down Cut Shin Creek: The Packhorse Librarians of Kentucky [Depression-era; juvenile literature].  New York: HarperCollins.  58 pp.

Baldwin, Fred D.  1999.  “Sarah’s Place: Transforming Lives” [Sarah’s Place Women’s Resource Center, Elliott Co., Ky.].  Appalachia: Journal of the Appalachian Regional Commission 32 (January-April): 30-35.

Baldwin, Fred D.  2004-2005.  “Leveraging Hope: The New Opportunity School for Women” [Berea, Ky.].  Appalachia Magazine: Journal of the Appalachian Regional Commission.  20 para.  http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS3423.

Barnett, Janice Willis.  2012.  “Coming Full Circle: Jennie Moore’s Work at Rocky Fork.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 2 (Winter): 19-21.  Presbyterian missionary teacher, 1903-1933, Unicoi County, Tenn.

Bean, Heather Ann Ackley.  2001.  Women, Music, and Faith in Central Appalachia.  Studies in Women and Religion, vol. 40.  Lewiston, N.Y.: Edwin Mellen Press.  236 pp.

Beatty, Bess.  2002.  “I Can’t Get My Bored on Them Old Lomes: Female Textile Workers in the Antebellum South.”  In Neither Lady nor Slave: Working Women of the Old South, ed. S. Delfino and M. Gillespie, 249-260.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Beaver, Patricia D.  1999.  “Women in Appalachia and the South: Gender, Race, Region, and Agency.”  NWSA: A Publication of the National Women’s Studies Association 11 (Fall): ix-xxix.

Beaver, Patricia, ed.  1999.  “Appalachia and the South: Place, Gender, and Pedagogy” [10 papers]. Special issue, NWSA Journal: A Publication of the National Women’s Studies Association 11 (Fall): 1-171.

Beckwith, Karen.  1998.  “Collective Identities of Class and Gender: Working-Class Women in the Pittston Coal Strike” [Va.; 1990].  Political Psychology 19 (March): 147-167.

Bell, Shannon Elizabeth, and Yvonne A. Braun.  2010.  “Coal, Identity, and the Gendering of Environmental Justice Activism in Central Appalachia” [20 interviews].  Gender & Society 24, no. 6 (December): 794-813.  “...with a focus on how women’s and men’s identities both shape and constrain their involvement in gendered ways.”

Bentley, Anna Briggs. 2002.  American Grit: A Woman’s Letters from the Ohio Frontier [Quaker; 1826-1870s].  Edited by Emily Foster. Ohio River Valley Series. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  344 pp.

Berkley, June Langford.  2005.  “Telling the Untold Stories.”  In Beyond Hill and Hollow: Original Readings in Appalachian Women’s Studies, ed. E. Englehardt, 232-250.  Athens: Ohio University Press.

Berry, Daleen.  2011.  Sister of Silence.  Foreword by Kenneth V. Lanning.  Morgantown, W.Va.: Nellie Bly Books.  344 pp.  Mother of four by age 21, Berry manages to break free of an abusive relationship and build a career as an award winning journalist.

Berthelot, Emily R., Troy C. Blanchard, and Timothy C. Brown.  2008.  “Scots-Irish Women and the Southern Culture of Violence: The Influence of Scots-Irish Females on High Rates of Southern Violence.”  Southern Rural Sociology  23, no. 2: 157-170.  http://www.ag.auburn.edu/auxiliary/srsa/pages/TOCs/vol23-2.htm.

Best, Gary Dean.  1994.  Witch Hunt in Wise County: The Persecution of Edith Maxwell [1930s Va. murder trial given “feud” overtones; cf. Sharon Hatfield’s 2005 book, Never Seen the Moon: The Trials of Edith Maxwell]. Westport, Conn.: Praeger.  186 pp.

Bingman, Mary Beth.  1999.  “Women in Appalachian Community Organizations: Sites of Learning and Change”  [Va.; adult learners; from interviews].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 5 (Fall): 215-226.

Blackwell, Deborah L.  2003.  “A Murder in the Kentucky Mountains: Pine Mountain Settlement School and Community Relations in the 1920s” [teacher’s unsolved murder; female administrators confront Harlan Co. power structure].  In Searching for Their Places: Women in the South Across Four Centuries, ed. T. Appleton and A. Boswell, 196-217.  Columbia: University of Missouri Press.

Blackwell, Deborah L.  2010.  “The Maternalist Politics of Road Construction at Pine Mountain Settlement School, 1900-1935” [Ky.].  Appalachian Journal 37, no. 3-4 (Spring/Summer): 226-241.  Community activist and “benevolence” workers, Katherine Pettit and Ethel DeLong.  Pettit also co-founded Hindman Settlement School in 1902.

Block, Mary R.  2011.  “‘Limited to Errors of Law’: Rape Law and Adjudication in the Nineteenth-Century Kentucky Court of Appeals.”  Ohio Valley History 11, no. 3 (Fall): 44-64.  Clay, Elliott, Knox, and Laurel County court cases referenced.

Bossman, Marilyn J.  2010.  “High on the Mountain: Callie Hash Wright, Virginia’s First Lady Mayor.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 26, no. 1 (Summer): 55-56.  Memoir; b. 1894; unincorporated Troutdale, Va., the state’s highest town at 3,200 feet elevation.

Boyd, Donald C.  2007.  “The Book Women of Kentucky: The WPA Pack Horse Library Project, 1936-1943.”  Libraries & the Cultural Record 42, no. 2 (May): 111-128.

Brooks, Shannon.  1999.  “Coming Home: Finding My Appalachian Mothers through Emma Bell Miles.”  NWSA Journal: A Publication of the National Women’s Studies Association 11 (Fall): 157-171.

Brown, Emma.  2011.  “Julia ‘Judy’ Bonds, 58, Dies: Outspoken Foe of Mountaintop Strip Mining.” Washington Post, 4 January.  1,096 words.  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/04/AR2011010406697_2.html.

Brown, Joyce Compton, and Les Brown.  2001.  “The Discourse of Food as Cultural Translation and Empowering Voice in Appalachian Women during the Outmigration Process.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 7 (Fall): 315-329.

Brown, Vickie Osborne.  2010.  Mountain Midwife: Life and Times of Isabella Brown Neal [1879-1957; Clay Co., W.Va.].  Charleston, W.Va: Mountain Memories Books.  150 pp.

Burk, Martha.  2007.  “Bluegrass Liberation: Appalachian-Grown Bluegrass Music Remains a ‘Boys Club,’ but There’s Feminism at Its Roots and Women Topping Its Charts.” Ms., 1 July, 50-53.

Cashin, Joan E.  1995.  “Women in the Promised Land: A Review Essay of Daughters of Canaan: A Saga of Southern Women” [by Margaret Ripley Wolfe, University Press of Kentucky, 1995].  Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 93 (Winter): 79-85.

Charron, Katherine Mellen.  2009.  Freedom’s Teacher: The Life of Septima Clark [1898-1987].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  462 pp.  African American civil rights activist; Highlander School.

Chesky, Anne.  2010.  “From Sewing to Shopping: Signals of a Shifting Economy.”  North Carolina Folklore Journal 57, no. 1 (Spring-Summer): 20-41.  Oral history interviews with women in Meat Camp community, Watauga County, documenting the transition “from weaving to sewing to quilting, which accompanied...the transition to market-oriented industrialism.”

Corbin, David.  2009.  “Workers’ Wives” [coal miners’ wives].  In The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, Vol. 13: Gender, 287-290.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Cordery, Simon.  2010.  Mother Jones: Raising Cain and Consciousness [1837-1930].  Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.  213 pp.  “...an exhaustive biography of Mary Harris Jones, drawn mostly from her own testimonials and primary source accounts of her work - which the activist-agitator didn’t begin until her sixties,” spending 23 years in West Virginia.

Cordery, Simon.  2010.  Mother Jones: Raising Cain and Consciousness [biography; 1837-1930].  Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.  213 pp.

Couto, Richard A.  2003.  “It Takes a Pillage: Women, Work, and Welfare” [welfare reform; poverty; public policy].  Race, Gender & Class 10, no.1: 60-78.

Cummings, Lindsay B.  2005.  “Women and Appalachian Opera Houses: A Place in the Public Domain” [Oh., Pa., Ky., W.Va.].  In Beyond Hill and Hollow: Original Readings in Appalachian Women’s Studies, ed. E. Englehardt, 124-136.  Athens: Ohio University Press.

Cunningham, Mia.  2001.  Anna Hubbard: Out of the Shadows [1902-1986; Ohio; wife of Harlan Hubbard].  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  224 pp.

Davis, Emili, and Winnie Lovell.  1998.  “Winnie’s World” [interview with owner of first beauty parlor in Rabun Co., Ga.; b. 1912].  Foxfire Magazine 32 (Spring/Summer): 34-40.

Delfino, Susanna.  2002.  “Invisible Woman: Female Labor in the Upper South’s Iron and Mining Industries.”  In Neither Lady nor Slave: Working Women of the Old South, ed. S. Delfino and M. Gillespie, 285-307.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Dickinson, W. Calvin.  2011.  “Dr. Dora Lee Wilder: Pioneer Female Physician of the Cumberland Plateau” [1877 or 1878-1963].  Journal Of East Tennessee History 83: 72-79.  First woman licensed to practice medicine in Tennessee (1906); profile of her industrialist husband, John Thomas Wilder.

Dublin, Thomas, and Walter Licht.  2000.  “Gender and Economic Decline: The Pennsylvania Anthracite Region, 1920-1970.”  Oral History Review 27 (Winter/Spring): 81-97.

Duff, Betty Parker.  2005.  “Stand By Your Man: Gender and Class Formation in the Harlan County Coalfields” [Ky.: Benham, Lynch, Cumberland].  In Beyond Hill and Hollow: Original Readings in Appalachian Women’s Studies, ed. E. Englehardt, 152-169.  Athens: Ohio University Press.

Dunaway, Wilma A.  2000.  “Women at Risk: Capitalist Incorporation and Community Transformation on the Cherokee Frontier.” In A World-Systems Reader: New Perspectives on Gender, Urbanism, Cultures, Indigenous Peoples, and Ecology, ed. T. Hall, 195-210.  Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield.

Dunaway, Wilma A.  2008.  Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South.  New York: Cambridge University Press.  301 pp.  Contents: Introduction -- No gendered sisterhood: ethnic and religious conflict among Euroamerican women -- Not a shared patriarchal space: imperialism, racism, and cultural persistence of indigenous Appalachian women -- Not a shared sisterhood of subordination: racism, slavery, and resistance by Black Appalachian females -- Not even sisters among their own kind: the centrality of class divisions among Appalachian women -- The myth of male farming and women’s agricultural labor -- The myth of separate spheres and women’s nonagricultural labor -- Family as privilege: public regulation of non-patriarchal households -- Motherhood as privilege: patriarchal intervention into women’s reproductive labors.

Durbin, Hazel.  2011.  “Hazel Durbin: An Oral History conducted by Vickie Cimprich” [1915-2002; Breathitt and Lee Counties, Ky.].  Still: The Journal, no. 7 (Fall).  2,330 words.  “From 1999 to 2002, Hazel Durbin recorded the stories that became her autobiography, A Quilted Life, co-authored with Vickie Cimprich (Contrary Beartrack Press, 2002).”  http://www.stilljournal.net/hazel-durbin-interview.php.

EagleTree, Phyllis M.  2007.  Roll the Wheel: The Abundant Life and Wisdom of Mae Phillips [1912-2006].  Foreword by N. Scott Momaday.  Louisville, Ky.: ForSight.  135 pp.  Portrait of a mountain woman in her words, with sepia tone photographs; Evarts, Harlan Co., Kentucky.

Ebel, Julia Taylor.  2003.  Addie Clawson: Appalachian Mail Carrier [juvenile literature; story of first woman mail carrier in Boone, N.C.; 1930s].  Art by Sherry Jensen.  Boone, N.C.: Parkway Publishers.  27 pp.

Edds, Margaret.  2009.  Finding Sara: Loss, Letters and a Daughter’s Journey [1915-1950; coal camp].  Louisville, Ky.: Butler Books.  280 pp.  Memoir of the author’s mother, who died when she was three, traced through letters and tracked to Oak Ridge, Tenn. and Lynch, Ky.

Edwards, Grace Toney, Mary Margaret Thompson, and M. Lynda Ely.  1996.  “Our Mothers’ Voices: Narratives of Generational Transformation.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 2 (Spring): 131-139.

Edwards, Pamela.  2008.  “West Virginia Women in World War II: The Role of Gender, Class, and Race in Shaping Wartime Volunteer Efforts.”  West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, new series, 2, no. 1 (Spring): 27-57.

Engel, Mary Ella.  2010.  “The Appalachian ‘Granny’: Testing the Boundaries of Female Power in Late-19th-Century Appalachian Georgia” [Chattooga Co., Mormon community].  Appalachian Journal 37, no. 3-4 (Spring/Summer): 210-225.

Engelhardt, Elizabeth S. D.  2001.  “Placing Their Feminism in the Southern Appalachian Mountains: Emma Bell Miles, Grace MacGowan Cooke, and the Roots of Ecological Feminism” [Spirit of the Mountains (1905); The Power and the Glory (1910)].  Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature 20 (June): 11-31.

Engelhardt, Elizabeth S. D.  2001.  “Wilma Dykeman and the Women of Appalachia: The Ecology of Mid-Century Environmental Activism” [French Broad river]. Women’s Studies Quarterly 29 (Spring/Summer): 155-169.

Engelhardt, Elizabeth S. D.  2005.  “Creating Appalachian Women’s Studies: Dancing Away from Granny and Elly May.” In Beyond Hill and Hollow: Original Readings in Appalachian Women’s Studies, ed. E. Englehardt, 1-19.  Athens: Ohio University Press.

Engelhardt, Elizabeth S. D., ed.  2005.  Beyond Hill and Hollow: Original Readings in Appalachian Women’s Studies [13 contributors, three sections: activism, class, space].  Ethnicity and Gender in Appalachia.  Athens: Ohio University Press.  260 pp.

Farr, Sidney Saylor.  2003.  “New Opportunities for Appalachian Women” [New Opportunity School for Women, Berea, Ky., founded 1987 by Jane Stephenson].  Appalachian Journal 30 (Summer): 350-354.

Few, April L.  2005.  “The Voices of Black and White Rural Battered Women in Domestic Violence Shelters” [southwest Va.; 30 women interviewed].  Family Relations 54 (October): 488-500.

Fink, Krista R.  2007.  Silent No More: Speaking Out About Domestic Violence.  Terra Alta, W.Va.: Headline Books.  171 pp.

Fisher, Diane Gilliam.  1999.  Recipe for Blackberry Cake [poems; W.Va.].  Wick Poetry Chapbook, series 2, no. 6.  Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press.  41 pp.

Flanigan, Beverly Olson.  2005.  “Appalachian Women and Language: Old and New Forms as Reflections of a Changing Image” [dialects: Upper Ohio Valley].  In Beyond Hill and Hollow: Original Readings in Appalachian Women’s Studies, ed. E. Englehardt, 177-195.  Athens: Ohio University Press.

Fonow, Mary Margaret.  1998.  “Protest Engendered: The Participation of Women Steelworkers in the Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Strike of 1985.”  Gender & Society 12: 710-728.

Fredette, Allison.  2009.  “The View from the Border: West Virginia Republicans and Women’s Rights in the Age of Emancipation.”  West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, new series, vol. 3, no. 1 (Spring): 57-80.  1860s new statehood, gender role attitudes and politics.

Gay, Kathlyn.  2006.  Mother Jones [1837-1930; biography; juvenile literature].  Greensboro, N.C.: Morgan Reynolds.  144 pp.

Gazarik, Richard.  2011.  Black Valley: The Life and Death of Fanny Sellins [UMWA organizer; 1870/72?–1919].  Publications of the Saint Vincent College Center for Northern Appalachian Studies.  Latrobe, Pa.: Saint Vincent College.  Documentary account of 1919 labor strikes in Pa.’s Allegheny Valley and the shooting of Fannie Sellins, gunned down by deputy sheriffs at a peaceful march past a coal mine on the eve of a nationwide steel strike.

Giesen, Carol A. B.  1995.  Coal Miners’ Wives: Portraits of Endurance.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  170 pp.

Gillespie, Michele.  2002.  “To Harden a Lady’s Hand: Gender Politics, Racial Realities, and Women Millworkers in Antebellum Georgia.”  In Neither Lady nor Slave: Working Women of the Old South, ed. S. Delfino and M. Gillespie, 261-284.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Goehring, Susan.  1999.  “Sweeter Than the Flowers: Edith Baker of King Knob” [Ritchie Co. reminiscence; 1930s].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 25 (Fall): 50-55.

Goh, Debbie.  2010.  “Who We Are and What We Want: A Feminist Standpoint Approach to Defining Effective ICT Use for West Virginian Women” [Top Student Paper Award winner]. Conference Papers -- International Communication Association, 2010 annual meeting.  “Through a 14-month ethnographic study of participants in beginner computer and internet courses, this study examines why West Virginian women are at the lower end of America’s digital divide.”

Grant, Judith.  2008.  Charting Women’s Journeys: From Addiction to Recovery.  Critical Perspectives on Crime and Inequality series.  Lanham, Md.: Lexington Books.  142 pp.  26 rural drug and alcohol addicts.

Greenwald, Maurine.  1996.  “Women and Pennsylvania Working-Class History” [textiles, shoes, paper, iron, lumber].  Pennsylvania History 63 (Winter): 5-16.

Greer, Jane.  2012.  “Women’s Words, Women’s Work: Rural Literacy and Labor.”  Chap. 5 in Reclaiming the Rural: Essays on Literacy, Rhetoric, and Pedagogy, ed. K. Donehower, C. Hogg, and E. Schell, 90-106.  Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.

Gugliotta, Angela.  2000.  “Class, Gender, and Coal Smoke: Gender Ideology and Environmental Injustice in Pittsburgh, 1868-1914” [antismoke activism].  Environmental History 5 (April): 165-193.

Guy, Roger.  2001.  “Identity, Pride, and a Paycheck: Appalachian and Other Southern Women in Uptown, Chicago, 1950-1970.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 7 (Spring): 46-63.

Haberstich, David.  1997.  “Barbara Beirne’s Women of Southern Appalachia” [Smithsonian photographic exhibition].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 14 (Summer): 3-7.

Hagen, Sarah Cornett.  2010.  Still Point, Life Notes from a Kentucky Woman: A Coal Camp.  Bloomington, Ind.: AuthorHouse.  103 pp.  Born 1936, Letcher County; 1950s coming of age.

Hall, Eula.  [1999] 2001.  “If There’s One Thing You Can Tell Them, It’s that You’re Free” [domestic abuse; Appalachian Volunteers; Mud Creek Clinic, Ky.].  In Back Talk from Appalachia: Confronting Stereotypes, ed. D. Billings, G. Norman, and K. Ledford, 191-199.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Originally published as Confronting Appalachian Stereotypes.

Hall, Jacquelyn Dowd, with Eugene P. Walker, Katherine Mellen Charron, and David P. Cline.  2010.  “‘I train the people to do their own talking’: Septima Clark and Women in the Civil Rights Movement”  [b. 1898; African American grassroots freedom activist].  Southern Cultures 16, no. 2 (Summer): 31-52.  “...four months before Rosa Parks’s infamous arrest [1955], she attended a workshop at the Highlander Folk School, an interracial adult education center in Monteagle, Tennessee...where Clark served as Director of Education.”

Harman, Patricia.  2011.  Arms Wide Open: A Midwife’s Journey.  Boston: Beacon Press.  287  pp.  Prequel to The Blue Cotton Gown: A Midwife’s Memoir (2008); W.Va.; 1970s counterculture communal life.

Harsh, Sharon Wilmoth.  2003.  “Win With Katie McGee” [profiles winner of first Girls’ State citizenship training school, summer, 1941].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 29 (Summer): 18-24.

Hatfield, Sharon.  2005.  Never Seen the Moon: The Trials of Edith Maxwell [1935 Wise Co., Va., murder trial and women’s injustice].  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.  286 pp.  Weatherford Award winner for nonfiction.

Helton, Lonnie R., and Shirley M. Keller.  2010.  “Appalachian Women: A Study of Resiliency Assets and Cultural Values.”  Journal of Social Service Research 36, no. 2: 151-161.  Ten women were interviewed about their school-age years, ages 5-18.

Hevesi, Dennis.  2011.  “Judy Bonds, an Enemy of Mountaintop Coal Mining, Dies at 58” [W.Va.; Coal River Mountain Watch].  New York Times, 16 January: 26(A).  771 words.  “In 2003 Ms. Bonds received the Goldman Environmental Prize, an annual $150,000 prize that goes to unrecognized ‘grass-roots environmental heroes’.”  http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/16/us/16bonds.html?_r=1&ref=dennishevesi.

Heyman, J. D., and Lauren Comander.  2003.  “A School for Appalachian Women Jump-starts Lives in Limbo” [Berea, Ky.; New Opportunity School for Women, “a crash course in self-esteem designed to jump-start the lives of Appalachian women”].  People Weekly, 18 August, 121-123.

Houk, Rose, and others.  2005.  The Walker Sisters of Little Greenbrier [Sevier Co., Tenn.; profile and photos of turn-of-century artifacts and folkways].  Gatlinburg, Tenn.: Great Smoky Mountains Association.  60 pp.

Hovanec, Evelyn.  2001.  Common Lives of Uncommon Strength: The Women of the Coal and Coke Era of Southwestern Pennsylvania, 1880-1970 [oral histories; spouses of immigrant miners].  Uniontown, Pa.: Pennsylvania State University, Fayette Campus, Coal and Coke Heritage Center.  227 pp.

Howe, Barbara J.  2002.  “Patient Laborers: Women at Work in the Formal Economy of West(ern) Virginia.”  In Neither Lady nor Slave: Working Women of the Old South, ed. S. Delfino and M. Gillespie, 121-151.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Howe, Barbara J.  2005.  “Urban Wage-Earning Women in a Rural State” [1830-1870 Wheeling, W.Va., employment options].  In Beyond Hill and Hollow: Original Readings in Appalachian Women’s Studies, ed. E. Englehardt, 101-123.  Athens: Ohio University Press.

Howe, Barbara J.  2010.  “On Stage and In Class: Women Artists in Mid-19th-Century Wheeling” [W.Va.; 1830-1870].  Appalachian Journal 37, no. 3-4 (Spring/Summer): 184-209.

Howe, Barbara J.  2010.  “Pioneers on a Mission for God: The Order of the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Wheeling, 1848-1860.”  West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, new series, vol. 4, no. 1 (Spring): 59-92.  Eight Visitandine nuns, in their “woman-defined space,” opened the Wheeling Female Academy in 1848.

Howe, Barbara J.  2011.  “Expansion Despite ‘National Difficulties’: The Order of the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Wheeling, 1861–1870” [Mont de Chantal Academy].  West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, new series, vol. 5, no. 2 (Fall): 59-101.

Howe, Barbara.  2006.  “Practicing Medicine in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Wheeling: The Story of Dr. Eliza Clark Hughes” [1817-1882; the first woman to earn a M.D. degree (1860) in what is now W.Va.].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 12, no. 2 (Fall): 7-35.

Howell, Benita J., and Judith Ivy Fiene.  2005.  “Designing Employee Assistance Programs for Appalachian Working-Class Women: The Alcohol and Stress Research Project.”  Chap. 11 in Appalachian Cultural Competency: A Guide for Medical, Mental Health, and Social Service Professionals, ed. S. Keefe, 247-264.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Howie, Irene B.  1999.  “Callie” [character profile of Howie’s grandmother].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 16 (Summer): 39-42.

Inman, Myra.  2000.  Myra Inman: A Diary of the Civil War in East Tennessee [b. 1845, d. 1914; social sphere in Cleveland, Bradley Co., Tenn.].  Edited by William R. Snell.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  395 pp.

Jensen, Joan M.  2000.  “Now You See Her, Now You Don’t: Historians and Rural Women” [blacks and whites].  In After the Backcountry: Rural Life in the Great Valley of Virginia, 1800-1900, ed. K. Koons and W. Hofstra, 221-232. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Jepsen, Thomas C.  2009.  “‘A Look into the Future’: Women Railroad Telegraphers and Station Agents in Pennsylvania, 1855-1960.”  Pennsylvania History 76, no. 2 (Spring): 141-163.

Joslin, Michael.  2012.  “Service Through Opportunity.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 2 (Winter): 16-18.  Jane Stephenson and the New Opportunity School for Women.  “Berea has graduated 599 women from the NOSW,” and summer 2012 marked the 25th anniversary class.

Latimer, Melissa, and Ann M. Oberhauser.  2004.  “Exploring Gender and Economic Development in Appalachia” [tables; 2000 Census].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 10, no. 3: 269-291.

Latimer, Melissa.  2000.  “A Contextual Analysis of the Effects of Gender and Place on Workers’ Incomes” [national and Appalachian subsample].  Sociological Spectrum 20 (July-September): 345-356.

LeRoy, Dan.  2001.  “Rural Women on Welfare Facing Bleak Prospects” [Welch, W.Va.].  Women’s Enews 27 May 2001.  40 para. November 27, 2013.

Locklear, Erica Abrams.  2011.  Negotiating a Perilous Empowerment: Appalachian Women’s Literacies [focuses on highly literate, central female characters in the works of Arnow, DeRosier, Giardina, and Lee Smith].  Series in Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in Appalachia.  Athens: Ohio University Press. 256 pp.  Contents: Appalachia on our pages: situating Appalachian literacy and literary analysis -- Shaping biscuit dough and rolling out steel: responding to literacy commodification in The Dollmaker -- Narrating socialization: Linda Scott Derosier’s memoirs.  Interview with Linda Scott DeRosier -- “Overcoming” backgrounds: competing discourses in The Unquiet Earth -- Invasion of the mountain teachers: literacy campaigns and conflicts in Lee Smith’s work.  Interview with Lee Smith.

Lundy, Ronni.  2006.  “Silvy’s House” [octogenarian Silvy Nett’s house in Southwest Va.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 22, no. 1 (Spring): 26-29.

Maggard, Sally Ward.  1994.  “Will the Real Daisy Mae Please Stand  Up?  A Methodological Essay on Gender Analysis in Appalachian  Research.”  Appalachian Journal 21 (Winter): 136-150.

Maggard, Sally Ward.  1995.  “Gender and Schooling in Appalachia: Lessons for an Era of Economic Restructuring.”  In Appalachia and the Politics of Culture, ed. E. C. Fine.  Journal of the Appalachian Studies Association 7: 140-151.  Johnson City: East Tennessee State University, Center for Appalachian Studies and Services.

Maggard, Sally Ward.  1998.  “‘We’re Fighting Millionaires!’: The Clash of Gender and Class in Appalachian Women’s Union Organizing.”  In No Middle Ground: Women and Radical Protest, ed. K. Blee, 289-306.  New York: New York University Press.

Maggard, Sally Ward.  1999.  “Gender, Race, and Place: Confounding Labor Activism in Central Appalachia” [Pikeville, Ky.; 1972 hospital strike].  In Neither Separate Nor Equal: Women, Race, and Class in the South, ed. B. Smith, 185-206.  Women in the Political Economy series.  Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Maggard, Sally Ward.  [1999] 2001.  “Coalfield Women Making History” [Ky.; 1970s hospital and coal strikes].  In Back Talk from Appalachia: Confronting Stereotypes, ed. D. Billings, G. Norman, and K. Ledford, 228-250.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Originally published as Confronting Appalachian Stereotypes.

Marsh, Ben.  2007.  Georgia’s Frontier Women: Female Fortunes in a Southern Colony.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  253 pp.

Marshall, Grace.  2006.  “Essie” [profile of Essie Riggs, four-foot-nine and mother of thirteen; hardships and endurance; Coeburn, Wise Co., Va.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 22, no. 1 (Spring): 34-36.

Martin, Darcy.  2002.  “Aunt Molly Jackson: The Perfect Miner’s Voice” [Mary Magdalene Garland, 1860-1960; folk singer].  Journal of American & Comparative Cultures 25 (Fall/Winter): 468-478.

Martini, Adrienne.  2006.  Hillbilly Gothic: A Memoir of Madness and Motherhood [postpartum depression; Knoxville].  New York: Free Press.  224 pp.

Mattaliano, Jane.  1998.  “The First Miss West Virginia” [1923; Neva Jackson].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 24 (Summer): 20-25.

McCleary, Ann E.  2006.  “‘Seizing the Opportunity’: Home Demonstration Curb Markets in Virginia” [1930s Augusta Co., Va.; Shenandoah Valley].  In Work, Family, and Faith: Rural Southern Women in the Twentieth Century, ed. M. Walker and R. Sharpless, 97-134.  Columbia: University of Missouri Press.

McDonough, Greta.  2010.  Her Troublesome Boys: The Lucy Furman Story [adolescent fiction; historical biography].  Kentucky Hero Series.  Louisville, Ky.: Motes Books.  143 pp.  Furman was a writer (The Quare Women, 1923, 1937) and influential teacher at the Hindman Settlement School on Troublesome Creek, Hindman, Ky.

McElroy, James T.  1999.  We’ve Got Spirit: The Life and Times of America’s Greatest Cheerleading Team [Ky.; Greenup County High School].  New York: Simon & Schuster.

McInnis-Dittrich, Kathleen.  1997.  “An Empowerment-Oriented Mental Health Intervention with Elderly Appalachian Women: The Women’s Club” [Eastern Ky.].  Journal of Women and Aging 9 (nos.1-2): 91-105.

McMullen, David Lee.  2010.  Strike!: The Radical Insurrections of Ellen Dawson [1900-1967].  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.  239 pp.  Labor activist, born in Scotland, who helped organize the 1929 textile workers strike in Gastonia, N.C.

Mead, Susan.  2007.  “Planting Seeds, Inspiring Hope: The Appalachian Women’s Alliance Ironweed Festival” [annual; October].  Pluck: The Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture, no. 2: 7-10.

Messer, Mary Judith.  2010.  “Moonshiner’s Daughter” [biography].  Lake Junaluska, NC : Doing Well Now Publishers.  218 pp.  Poor and abused as a child; 1940s-50s Great Smoky Mountains, Haywood County, N.C.

Messinger, Penny.  2010.  “Restoring the Woman Reformer: Helen Hastie Dingman and ‘Mountain Work,’ 1916-1950” [d.1978 at 93].  Appalachian Journal 37, no. 3-4 (Spring/Summer): 242-264.  Female Progressive, Presbyterian missionary, and Berea College faculty member who played a central role in the Conference of Southern Mountain Workers, “and helped define the Appalachian region for outsiders.”

Randall, Elizabeth J., and Leslie E. Tower.  2010.  “Appalachia: Addressing Domestic Violence in the Rural Environment.”  Chap. 13 in Domestic Violence: Intersectionality and Culturally Competent Practice, ed. L. Lockhart and F. Danis, 343-368.  New York: Columbia University Press.  Case study; 15 women interviewed;  “...traditional values...may, inadvertently, promote cultural tolerance of family violence.”

Miewald, Christiana E., and Eugene J. McCann.  2004. “Gender Struggle, Scale, and the Production of Place in the Appalachian Coalfields” [Ky.;  interviews with fourteen women].  Environment & Planning A, vol. 36, no. 6 (June): 1045-1064.

Miller, Tia.  2001.  “Aunt Jennie” [W.Va. banjoist Virginia Myrtle Ellis, 1900-1992].  Traditions: A Journal of West Virginia Folk Culture and Educational Awareness 6: 28-30.

Moore, Marat.  1996.  “Women Go Underground.”  In The United Mine Workers of America: A Model of Industrial Solidarity?, ed. J. Laslett, 484-512.  University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.

Moore, Marat.  1996.  Women in the Mines: Stories of Life and Work.  Twaynes’s Oral History Series, no. 20.  New York: Twayne.  337 pp.

Nava, Margaret.  2012.  “A Labor of Love” [Tenn.?].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 2 (Winter): 24-25.  Anecdotal memories of a granny midwife’s remarkable service.

Newton, Roxanne.  2007.  Women Workers on Strike: Narratives of Southern Women Unionists.  Studies in American Popular History and Culture.  New York: Routledge.  187 pp.

Norris, Randall, and Jean-Philippe Cypres.  1996.  Women of Coal [interviews, photographs].  Introductions by Denise Giardina, Nikki Giovanni, Jim Wayne Miller, and Helen M. Lewis, Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  128 pp.

O’Brien, Robert J.  1997.  “Persecution and Acceptance: The Strange History of Discrimination Against Married Women Teachers in West Virginia” [1930s; women forced out of teaching when they married].  West Virginia History 56: 56-75.

Oberhauser, Ann M.  1995.  “Gender and Household Economic Strategies in Rural Appalachia.”  Gender, Place and Culture 2 (March): 51-70.

Oberhauser, Ann M.  1995.  “Towards a Gendered Regional Geography: Women and Work in Rural Appalachia.”  Growth and Change 26 (Spring): 217-244.

Oberhauser, Ann M.  2002.  “Relocating Gender and Rural Economic Strategies” [knitware; 60 home-based workers].  Environment and Planning A 34 (July): 1221-1237.

Oberhauser, Ann M.  2005.  “Scaling Gender and Diverse Economies: Perspectives from Appalachia and South Africa” [hegemony of global capitalism challenged].  Antipode 37 (5): 863-874.

Oberhauser, Ann M., Amy Pratt, and Anne-Marie Turnage.  2001.  “Unraveling Appalachia’s Rural Economy: The Case of a Flexible Manufacturing Network” [gendered economic strategies].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 7 (Spring): 19-45.

Oberhauser, Ann M., and Anne-Marie Turnage.  1999.  “A Coalfield Tapestry: Weaving the Socioeconomic Fabric of Women’s Lives” [W.Va.; informal economy].  In Neither Separate Nor Equal: Women, Race, and Class in the South, ed. B. Smith, 109-122.  Women in the Political Economy series.  Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Orr, Mabel Chappell; interview by Mary E. Lynn Drew.  “Heroic Women of the Southern Highlands” [1920s Robbinsville, Graham Co., N.C.; excerpt from oral history series in progress].  Appalachian Heritage 26 (Spring): 42-45.

Pearson, Nelda K.  1999.  “Empowerment and Disempowerment of Women in Central Appalachia, U.S.A.”  In Democratization and Women’s Grassroots Movements, ed. J. Bystydzienski, J. Sekhon, 328-351.  Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Pendarvis, Edwina.  2003.  “At the Edge of the Past: Jenny Wiley’s Story and Its Relevance Today” [1789 Indian captivity; POW Jessica Lynch].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 20, no. 2-3 (Summer/Winter): 13-17.

Pendarvis, Edwina.  2012.  “Exotic Dancing and the Odds for a Happily Ever After.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 2 (Winter): 33-35.  Blaze Starr, and Cabell County, W.Va.

Peterson, Angela Marsh.  2005.  One Woman’s Century: The Remarkable Story of Angela Marsh Peterson, 1902-2000.  Edited by Kevin J. Todeschi.  `Boone, N.C.: Parkway Publishers.  243 pp.

Pollitt, Phoebe.  2012.  “Mary Rose Batterham: The Second Registered Nurse in the United States” [b. 1858; Asheville, N.C.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 2 (Winter): 12-14.

Puckett, Anita.  1992.  “‘Let the Girls Do the Spelling and Dan Will Do the Shooting’: Literacy, the Division of Labor, and Identity in a Rural Appalachian Community” [Ky.].  Anthropological Quarterly 65 (July): 137-147.  Special issue: Negotiating Identity in Southeastern U.S. Uplands.

Ramey, Jennifer.  1996.  “Nanny: An Interview With Clara Mae Ramey” [Rabun Co., Ga.; reminiscences].  Foxfire Magazine 30 (Fall/Winter): 141-152.

Rasmussen, Barbara.  2007.  “Food and Rebellion in Monroe County: Recalling Georgia Wickline” [1904-1995, the author’s grandmother].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 33, no. 3 (Fall): 40-45.

Reed, Wendy, and Jennifer Horne, ed.  2006.  All Out of Faith: Southern Women on Spirituality.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  198 pp.  Contents: That old-time religion / Shirley Abbott -- This is our world / Dorothy Allison -- Why Jesus loved whores / Vicki Covington -- Awakening / Sue Monk Kidd -- The making of a preacher’s wife / Cassandra King -- Knowing our place / Barbara Kingsolver -- Relics of summer / Frances Mayes -- From Birmingham to redemption / Diane McWhorter -- Full circle / Pauli Murray -- When woods are dark: the enchantment of the infinite / Sena Jeter Naslund -- Sex, race, and the stained-glass window / Sylvia Rhue -- Becoming a cantor / Jessica Roskin -- I lead two lives: confessions of a closet Baptist / Mab Segrest -- Interview with Lee Smith / Susan Ketchin -- Where the spirit moved me / Jeanie Thompson -- A Baptist-Buddhist / Jan Willis.

Reichart, Karaleah S.  2001. “Narrating Conflict: Women and Coal in Southern West Virginia” [ethnographic interviews].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 7 (Spring): 6-18.

Resor, Cynthia Williams.  2007.  “A Whistling Girl and a Crowing Hen: Changing Productivity and Gender Expectations” [Eastern Kentucky University].  Southern Rural Sociology 22, no. 1: 98-109.

Rezek, Jan.  2010.  “Gender Role Patterns: How They Factor Into Support Systems for Young Mothers in Rural Appalachia” [unmarried, age 15-17].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 16, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 131-143.  Tables.  From interviews with eight teen mothers in three W.Va. counties: Fayette, Raleigh, Kanawha.

Rice, Connie Park.  2006.  “‘Shepherdess of the Hills’: The Salvation Army Mountain Ministry of Cecil Brown” [N.C.; first Salvation Army mission in Appalachia, 1935].  In Work, Family, and Faith: Rural Southern Women in the Twentieth Century, ed. M. Walker and R. Sharpless, 200-225.  Columbia: University of Missouri Press.

Rieff, Lynne.  2006.  “Revitalizing Southern Homes: Rural Women, the Professionalization of Home Demonstration Work, and the Limits of Reform, 1917-1945” [Alabama].  In Work, Family, and Faith: Rural Southern Women in the Twentieth Century, ed. M. Walker and R. Sharpless, 135-165.  Columbia: University of Missouri Press.

Roberts-Gevalt, Anna.  2010.  “Effie Smith Pierson.”  Old-Time Herald 12, no. 5 (June-July): 10-17.  Biography of this midwife and fiddler, born 1902 in Sturgeon, Owsley Co., Ky.  http://oldtimeherald.org/archive/back_issues/index.html.

Roberts-Gevalt, Anna.  2010.  “Lella Christopher Todd.”  Old-Time Herald 12, no. 6 (August-September): 10-13.  Profile of Todd, a notable fiddler, born 1891 in Estill Co., Ky.

Roberts, Ronald, and Carol Cooke-Roberts.  1998.  Mother Jones and Her Sisters: A Century of Women Activists in the American Coal Fields.  Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company.  290 pp.

Romalis, Shelly.  1998.  Pistol Packin’ Mama: Aunt Molly Jackson and the Politics of Folksong [Ky. midwife, labor activist, songwriter; 1880-1960].  Music in American Life.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.  264 pp.

Rose, Jessamine [a.k.a. Susan Haynes].  2010.  Don’t Let the Secret Out [b. 1937; Ky.].  Brandenburg, Ky.: Bearhead Publishing.  113 pp.  Child abuse; biographical anecdotes.

Ross, Paul E.  1995.  “Annie Oakley and the Hillbilly Jinx.”  Appalachian Journal 22 (Winter): 262-275.

Roydhouse, Marion W.  2007.  Women of Industry and Reform: Shaping the History of Pennsylvania, 1865-1940.  University Park: Pennsylvania Historical Association.  106 pp.  Includes short sections on coal mining and silk mills, plus “Bibliography and Suggestions for Further Reading,” 101-104.

Sale, Anna.  2007.  “Sisters in Coal: A History of Women in the West Virginia Mines.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 33, no. 1 (Spring): 10-17.

Sauceman, Fred.  2011.  “Getting Lessons In Between.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 1 (Summer): 37-40.  Profile of East Tennessean Besse Brown Cooper, world’s oldest living person at age 114.

Sauceman, Fred.  2012.  “Editor’s Notebook” [preface to special issue, “Serving Appalachia”].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 2 (Winter): 3.  Profile of Ilo Birchfield Salyer of Cole Springs, Tenn., television host of the variety show, “Memo from Ilo,” which “ran on WJHL from 1957 to 1966, 30 minutes a day, five days a week.”

Savage, Carletta.  2000.  “Re-gendering Coal: Female Miners and Male Supervisors.”   Appalachian Journal 27 (Spring): 232-248.

Seaton, Carter Taylor.  2012.  “Adrienne Belafonte Beisemeyer: Weaver, Social Activist, Dancer” [Lewisburg, W.Va.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 2 (Winter): 28-30.  Adrienne is the daughter of Harry Belafonte.

Seitz, Virginia Rinaldo.  1995.  Women, Development, and Communities for Empowerment in Appalachia.  SUNY Series in Gender and Society.  Albany: State University of New York Press.  288 pp.

Shainbaum, Barry.  2001.  “Judy Hensley.”  In Hope and Heroes: Portraits of Integrity, photographs by Barry Shainbaum, text by Madelaine Palko and Shannon Fitzgerald, 50-51.  Toronto: London Street Press.  With her Wallins Elementary School students in Harlan County, Ky., Hensley led the successful Save Black Mountain (from strip mining) project.  Black Mountain is Kentucky’s highest peak.

Shaw, Moira P.  2005.  “From Every Mountainside, Let Freedom Ring: A Transnational Feminist Journey through the Experiences of West Virginian and Bolivian Mountain Women.”  In Beyond Hill and Hollow: Original Readings in Appalachian Women’s Studies, ed. E. Englehardt, 196-211.  Athens: Ohio University Press.

Smith, Barbara Ellen, ed.  1999.  Neither Separate Nor Equal: Women, Race, and Class in the South [13 essays: 7 Appalachian].  Women in the Political Economy series. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.  286 pp.

Smith, Barbara Ellen.  1998.  “Walk-Ons in the Third Act: The Role of Women in Appalachian Historiography” [feminist approach needed].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 4 (Spring): 5-28.

Smith, Barbara Ellen.  1999.  “‘Beyond the Mountains’: The Paradox of Women’s Place in Appalachian History.”  NWSA Journal: A Publication of the National Women’s Studies Association 11 (Fall): 1-17.

Smith, Karen Cecil.  2003.  Orlean Puckett: The Life of a Mountain Midwife, 1844-1939 [Blue Ridge Va.].  Boone, N.C.: Parkway Publishers.  166 pp.

Smith, Margaret Supplee, and Emily Herring Wilson.  1999.  North Carolina Women: Making History [essays, biographies; prehistory to WWII].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  382 pp.

Smith, Sandra Wilson.  2010.  “Frontier Androgyny: An Archetypal Female Hero in The Adventures of Daniel Boone.”  Journal of American Studies 44, no. 2: 269-286.

Smith, Tammy Robinson, ed.  2007.  Self-Rising Flowers [fiction]. Bristol, Va.: Mountain Girl Press.  201 pp.  Short stories about Appalachian women, by 15 women authors.

Sohn, Katherine Kelleher.  2003.  “Whistlin’ and Crowin’ Women of Appalachia: Literacy Practices Since College” [eight women: literacy; self-confidence; identity].  College Composition and Communication 54 (February): 423-52.

Sohn, Katherine Kelleher.  2006.  Whistlin’ and Crowin’ Women of Appalachia: Literacy Practices Since College [Eastern Ky.; case studies of three women].  Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.  176 pp.  Based on the author’s 1999 dissertation of the same title.

Spatig, Linda, Laurel Parrott, Carolyn Carter, Marian Keyes, and Pat Kusimo.  2001.  “We Roll Deep: Community and Resistance in the Lives of Appalachian Girls” [W.Va.; eight voices/social-structural models; urban and rural, including African American ].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 7 (Spring): 64-92.

Speer, Jennie, and Ann Speer.  2000.  Sisters of Providence: The Search for God in the Frontier South (1843-1858) [diaries; Providence, N.C.].  Edited by Allen Paul Speer and Janet Barton Speer.  Johnson City, Tenn.: Overmountain Press.  290 pp.

Steadman, Jennifer Bernhardt, Elizabeth Engelhardt, Frances Smith Foster, and Laura Micham.  2002.  “Archive Survival Guide: Practical and Theoretical Approaches for the Next Century of Women’s Studies Research” [Engelhardt focus on Appalachian Native- and African-American women].  Legacy 19, no. 2: 230-240.

Steele, Virginia.  1999.  “‘Good for the Soul’: Gladys Larew at 100" [profile; Monroe Co.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 25 (Summer): 40-47.

Stephens, Carol C.  2005.  “Culturally Relevant Preventive Health Care for Southern Appalachian Women.”  Chap. 9 in Appalachian Cultural Competency: A Guide for Medical, Mental Health, and Social Service Professionals, ed. S. Keefe, 197-217.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Storrs, Landon R. Y.  2003.  “Gender and Sectionalism in New Deal Politics: Southern White Women’s Campaign for Labor Reform” [textile industry].  In Searching for Their Places: Women in the South Across Four Centuries, ed. T. Appleton and A. Boswell, 218-237.  Southern Women.  Columbia: University of Missouri Press.

Strong, Cliffie.  2004.  Strong Survival: The Life and Times of a Mountain Woman [Owsley Co., Ky.; biography; case study].  Hagerhill, Ky.: Christian Appalachian Project.  104 pp.

Swank, Eric, Breanne Fahs, and Holly N. Haywood.  2011.  “Evaluating Appalachian Distinctiveness for Gender Expectations, Sexual Violence, and Rape Myths.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 17, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 123-143.  Tables.  Study of eastern Kentucky college students.

Tallichet, Suzanne E.  1998.  “Moving Up Down in the Mine: The Preservation of Male Privilege Underground” [from interviews with ten women coal miners].  In More Than Class: Studying Power in U.S. Workplaces, ed. A. Kingsolver, 124-147.  Albany: State University of New York Press.

Tallichet, Suzanne E.  2000.  “Barriers to Women’s Advancement in Underground Coal Mining.”  Rural Sociology 65 (June): 234-252.
Tallichet, Suzanne E.  2006.  Daughters of the Mountain: Women Coal Miners in Central Appalachia [W.Va.; sex discrimination; interviews with 14 women; 1990s].  Rural Studies Series.  University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.  210 pp.

Tice, Karen W.  1998.  “School-Work and Mother-Work: The Interplay of Maternalism and Cultural Politics in the Educational Narratives of Kentucky Settlement Workers, 1910-1930" [Lucy Furman and Ethel deLong].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 4 (Fall): 191-224.

Turner, Elizabeth Hayes.  2009.  Women and Gender in the New South: 1865-1945 [approx. 60 essays].  Wheeling, Ill.: Harlan Davidson.  271 pp.

Tyler-McGraw, Marie; photographs by Gary Simmons.  [1977] 1999.  “Mother’s Day Revisited” [Grafton, W.Va.; home of Mother’s Day founder Anna Jarvis].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 25 (Spring): 10-17.  Reprint, originally published vol. 3, no. 4.

Ulrich, Laurel Thatcher.  2001.  The Age of Homespun: Objects and Stories in the Creation of an American Myth.  New York: Knopf.  501 pp.

Ulrich, Laurel Thatcher.  2001.  The Age of Homespun: Objects and Stories in the Creation of an American Myth [19th-century New England; applicable to Appalachia].  New York: Knopf.  501 pp.

VanLandingham, Frances Henson.  2003.  Back on Nowhere Road [Tenn., autobiography].  Boone, N.C.: Parkway Publishers.  168 pp.

Walker, Melissa, and Rebecca Sharpless, ed.  2006.  Work, Family, and Faith: Rural Southern Women in the Twentieth Century [ten essays].  Columbia: University of Missouri Press.  294 pp.

Walker, Melissa, ed.  2004.  Country Women Cope with Hard Times: A Collection of Oral Histories [16 oral histories; East Tenn., S.C.].  Women’s Diaries and Letters of the South, no. 20.  Columbia: University of South Carolina Press.  208 pp.

Walker, Melissa.  2000.  All We Knew Was to Farm: Rural Women in the Upcountry South, 1919-1941.  Revisiting Rural America series.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.  344 pp.

Walker, Melissa.  2003.  “The Changing Character of Farm Life: Rural Southern Women.”  In Southern Women at the Millennium: A Historical Perspective, ed. M. Walker, J. R. Dunn, and J. P. Dunn, 145-175.  Columbia: University of Missouri Press.

Warren, Sarah T.  2002.  “One Step Further: Women’s Access to and Control Over Farm and Forest Resources in the U.S. South.”  Southern Rural Sociology 19, no. 2: 94-113.

Watkins, Charles Alan.  1999.  “Weaving Day at Penland: A Photographic Analysis” [Bayard Wootten photos; 1920s].  NWSA: A Publication of the National Women’s Studies Association 11 (Fall): 18-23.

Webb-Sunderhaus, Sara.  2012.  “Living with Literacy’s Contradictions: Appalachian Students in a First-Year Writing Course” [identity; values].  Chap. 12 in Reclaiming the Rural: Essays on Literacy, Rhetoric, and Pedagogy, ed. K. Donehower, C. Hogg, and E. Schell, 207-222. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.  Twelve student participants, at majority-women State University–Sciotoville (pseud.).

Weise, Robert.  1995.  “Property, Gender, and the Sale of Mineral Rights in Pre-industrial Eastern Kentucky.”  In Appalachia and the Politics of Culture, ed. E. C. Fine.  Journal of the Appalachian Studies Association 7: 79-90.  Johnson City: East Tennessee State University, Center for Appalachian Studies and Services.

Weissman, Karen Hyde.  2005. “Property and Gender in the Inheritance Patterns of a Southern Appalachian Community: Boone County, West Virginia, 1865-1924” [reviews recorded wills, property distribution].  Journal of Family History 30 (January): 48-65.

Wells, Jane.  1996.  Run Jane Run: A True Story of Murder and Courage [Ky.; wife abuse].  Far Hills, N.J.: New Horizon Press.  327 pp.  Biography/case study.

Williamson, Celia.  2005.  “Appalachian Women and Poverty: Work in the Underground Economy” [prostitution: Toledo, Ohio, 1970s-1990s].  In Beyond Hill and Hollow: Original Readings in Appalachian Women’s Studies, ed. E. Englehardt, 137-151.  Athens: Ohio University Press.

Willis, Stacey M.  1998.  “‘Recovering from My Own Little War’: Women and Domestic Violence in Rural Appalachia” [W.Va.; case study].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 4 (Fall): 255-270.

Withrow, Dolly.  2012.  “Jenny Carnell: Born to Serve” [Ripley, W.Va.].  Lewisburg, W.Va.  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 2 (Winter): 31-32.  Profile of this 79-year-old, along with her recipe for “chow-chow,” (Chunky Zucchini Relish).

Wolensky, Kenneth C., and Robert P. Wolensky.  1999.  “Against the Odds: Min Matheson and the ILGWU”  [Minnie Lurye Matheson, union leader; 1940s Wyoming Valley, Pa.; International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 16 (Summer): 22-27.

Wolfe, Margaret Ripley.  1998.  “The Feminine Dimension in the Volunteer State.”  In Tennessee History: The Land, The People, and the Culture,  ed. C. Van West, 29-55.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Women in Appalachia.  2010.  Special issue, Appalachian Journal 37, no. 3-4 (Spring/Summer): 140-312.  Poetry, an interview with Patricia D. Beaver by guest editor Bruce E. Stewart, and articles by Barbara J. Howe, Mary Ella Engel, Deborah L. Blackwell, Penny Messinger, Robert C. Poister, and Mary K. Anglin.  Note also: “Recent Scholarship on Women in Appalachia,” which lists 20 references, in “From the Editor” column, pp. 140-141.

Young, Virginia C.  2010.  “‘A Little Extra Persuasion’: Gender and Craft Unionism in West Virginia’s Glass Industry, 1900-1950s” [tables].  West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, new series, vol. 4, no. 2 (Fall) : 35-58.  Fostoria Glass, Moundsville, W.Va.; American Flint Glass Workers Union (AFGWU), Local 507.