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Religion

Church denominations; Primitive Baptists; Holiness Churches, and snake handling; religion in schools; missionary workers; circuit riders; revivals.

Abell, Troy D.  [1982] 1998.  Better Felt Than Said: The Holiness-Pentecostal Experience in Southern Appalachia.  Reprint. Waco, Tex.: Baylor University Press.  216 pp.  Originally published: Waco, Tex.: Marham Press.

Abrams, Douglas Carl.  2001.  Selling the Old-Time Religion: American Fundamentalists and Mass Culture, 1920-1940.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  168 pp.

Allison, Dorothy.  2006.  “This Is Our World.”  In All Out of Faith: Southern Women on Spirituality, ed. W. Reed, and J. Horne, 14-25.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.

Andrzejewski, Anna Vemer.  2000.  “The Gazes of Hierarchy at Religious Camp Meetings, 1850-1925” [Pa.].  Chap. 8 in People, Power, Places: Perspectives in Vernacular Architecture, VIII, ed. S. McMurry and A. Adams, 138-157.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Anglin, Mary.  1995.  “Ministering to the Working Class: Evangelical Protestantism in Rural Appalachia.”  In Religion in the Contemporary South: Diversity, Community, and Identity, ed. O. K. White, Jr., and D. White, 97-105.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 28.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Appleby, Monica Kelly.  1999.  “A Baptism by Immersion in Big Stone Gap: From South Side Chicago to Southern Appalachia” [Glenmary Sister; Wise Co., Va.].  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 278-296.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Argoe, April, and Alisha Argoe.  2005.  “Stickin’ with the Lord: An Interview with Rev. John McKnight” [b. 1934, Grayson Co., Va.].  Foxfire Magazine 39 (Fall/Winter): 81-97.

Arnow, Pat.  1999.  “Snake Handling.”  Southern Exposure 27 (Fall): 70.

Basinger, David.  2011.  “‘We the Baptist Church at Bethel Now in Session’: Levi Joseph Jenkins, the Bethel Baptist Church, and Religion in Tuckaleechee Cove and Cades Cove.”  Journal Of East Tennessee History 83: 25-39.

Bernhardt, Jack.  2001. “Performance, Faith, and Bluegrass Gospel: An Anthropological Journey with Jerry and Tammy Sullivan” [Ala.; Pentecostal ministry].  In Country Music Annual 2000, ed. C. Wolfe and J. Akenson, 51-69. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Birckhead, Jim.  1996.  “Snake Handlers: Heritage, Salvation, and Celebrity in the ‘90s.” Appalachian Journal 23 (Spring): 260-274.

Bond, S. Thomas.  2007.  “The Old Brick Church at Lost Creek” [Harrison Co.; Seventh Day Baptist; built 1870s].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 33, no. 1 (Spring): 34-39.

Bowdle, Donald N.  1999.  “Holiness in the Highlands: A Profile of the Church of God.”  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 243-256.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Brand, Irene B.  2005.  “Harmony Church: Witness and Worship in Mason County” [organized 1812].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 31, no. 1 (Spring): 30-35.

Brown, Fred, and Jeanne McDonald.  2000.  The Serpent Handlers: Three Families and Their Faith [W.Va., Ky., Tenn.]. Winston-Salem, N.C.: John F. Blair.  356 pp.

Brown, Rodger Lyle.  1997.  “Destiny in Dayton: The Scopes Trial Play and Festival at Dayton, Tennessee.”  In Ghost Dancing on the Cracker Circuit: The Culture of Festivals in the American South, by Rodger Lyle Brown, 121-143.  Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.

Brunn, Stanley D., Gerald R. Webster, and J. Clark Archer.  2011.  “The Bible Belt in a Changing South: Shrinking, Relocating, and Multiple Buckles.”  Southeastern Geographer 51, no. 4 (Winter): 513-549.  Shaded county outline maps.  From the Old Belt Buckle, eastern Tenn./western N.C. (1970), to the New Belt Buckle, northern Texas (2000).

Burton, Thomas, and Ed Speer.  2003.  “George Went Hensley: A Biographical Note” [b. 1881; initiator of Christian serpent handling].  Appalachian Journal 30 (Summer): 346-348.

Burton, Thomas.  2004.  The Serpent and the Spirit: Glenn Summerford’s Story [1992 Scottsboro, Ala., trial of snake handler for attempted murder].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  262 pp.

Caldwell, David Andrew.  2009.  “Rev. David Caldwell (1725–1824): Incarnation of a Cause, a Country, and an Age” [Presbyterian; Greensboro; Alamance Co.; Guilford Co.].  Journal of Backcountry Studies (online), vol. 4, no.1 (Spring): 102 pp.  Excerpted from the author’s forthcoming biography.  http://libjournal.uncg.edu/ojs/index.php/jbc/issue/view/9.

Callahan, Richard J.  2009.  Work and Faith in the Kentucky Coal Fields: Subject to Dust.  Religion in North America series.  Bloomington: Indiana University Press.  259 pp.  Contents: Introduction -- 1. Appalachian Mountain Religion -- 2. Patterns of Life and Work -- 3. Coal Town Life -- 4. “It’s About as Dangerous a Thing as Exists” -- 5. Power in the Blood -- 6. Suffering and Redemption.

Callahan, Richard J., Kathryn Lofton, and Chad E. Seales.  2010.  “Allegories of Progress: Industrial Religion in the United States” [coal mining].  Journal Of The American Academy Of Religion 78, no. 1: 1-39.  “We argue that American Protestant reformers and industrialists collaborated to use industrial religion in order to civilize landscapes, cleanse bodies, and convert individuals into the requisite disciplines of modern labor and consumption.”

Caroline Diepenbrock.  2011.  “Beginning at Jerusalem in the Regions Beyond: Edward O. Guerrant and the Southern Home Mission Movement.  In Proceedings of the Big South Undergraduate Research Symposium (BigSURS) 2011, Virginia Military Institute, Virginia
April 15–16, 2011, 15-26.  University of North Carolina at Asheville.  http://urp.unca.edu/sites/urp.unca.edu/files/BS11History.pdf.

Clark, Thomas D.  2005.  “Holy Rollers” [Church of God; unpublished material originally intended for Clark’s 1942 book The Kentucky].  Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 103, nos.1-2: 93-107.

Cooper, Ann Goode.  2006.  The Angel of Happy Hollow: The Story of Mary Elizabeth “Toddy” Collins [1868-1947; 1905 missionary to coal camp of Roda, Va.].  Boone, N.C.: Parkway Publishers.  476 pp.

Covington, Dennis.  1995.  Salvation on Sand Mountain: Snake Handling and Redemption in Southern Appalachia.  Reading: Addison-Wesley.  240 pp.

Cox, W. Eugene, and Joyce Cox.  2006.  Jonesborough’s Historic Churches.  Jonesborough, Tenn.: Heritage Alliance of Northeast Tennessee and Southwest Virginia.  125 pp.

Cunningham, Rodger.  2010.  “The Green Side of Life: Appalachian Magic as a Site of Resistance.”  Appalachian Heritage 38, no. 2 (Spring): 54-62.  Essay on regional magic and religion.

Daugherty, Mary Lee.  1999.  “Serpent Handlers: When the Sacrament Comes Alive.”  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 138-152.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Davis, Sylvia Delee, ed.  2008.  Appalachian Angels: Personal Essays of Angel Encounters and Near-Death Experiences from the Mountains.  West Conshohocken, Pa.: Infinity Publishing.  108 pp.  Kentucky; 40 accounts.

Denson, Andrew C.  1995.  “Diversity, Religion, and the North Carolina Regulators.”  North Carolina Historical Review 72 (January): 30-53.

DePalma, Margaret C.  2004.  Dialogue on the Frontier: Catholic and Protestant Relations, 1793-1883 [Ohio, Ky.].  Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press.  220 pp.

Dieter, Melvin E.  1999.  “Wesleyan/Holiness Churches.”  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 227-242.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Dorgan, Howard.  1994.  “The ‘No Heller’ Baptists of Central  Appalachia: Primitives Adapt to Universalism.”  In Appalachian  Adaptations to a Changing World, ed. Norma Myers.  Journal of the Appalachian Studies Association 6: 81-88.  Johnson City: Center for Appalachian Studies and Services, East Tennessee State University.

Dorgan, Howard.  1996.  “Divide and Multiply: Baptist Diversity in Appalachia.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 13 (Winter): 8-11.

Dorgan, Howard.  1997.  In the Hands of a Happy God: The “No-Hellers” of Central Appalachia  [Primitive Baptist Universalists].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  224 pp.

Dorgan, Howard.  1999.  “Old-Time Baptists of Central Appalachia.”  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 117-137.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Dorgan, Howard, section editor.  2006.  “Religion” [signed articles].  In Encyclopedia of Appalachia, ed. R. Abramson and J. Haskell, 1281-1359 (with introductory essay, 1281-1289).  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Drake, Richard, Bill J. Leonard, J. Stephen Rhodes, and Larry D. Shinn.  1996.  Reviews of Appalachian Mountain Religion: A History, by Deborah Vansau McCauley (University of Illinois Press, 1995).  Appalachian Heritage 24 (Winter): 40-59.

Duin, Julia.  2011.  “In West Virginia, Snake Handling Is Still Considered a Sign of Faith” [Jolo, W.Va.].  Washington Post, 13 November, 19(A).  2,939 words.  Photo gallery. http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/magazine/in-wva-snake-handling-is-still-considered-a-sign-of-faith/2011/10/18/gIQAmiqL9M_story.html.

Duin, Julia.  2012.  “Pastor Dies Practicing Snake-Handling Faith” [Mack Wolford; W.Va.].  Washington Post, 30 May, 1(C).  995 words.  http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/serpent-handling-pastor-profiled-earlier-in-washington-post-dies-from-rattlesnake-bite/2012/05/29/gJQAJef5zU_story.html.

Duin, Julia.  2012.  “Reviving Faith by ‘Taking Up Serpents’: For a New Generation of Internet-Savvy Pentecostals, a Century-Old Practice Provides ‘Anointing’” [Tabernacle Church of God in La Follette, Tenn.].  Wall Street Journal, 7 April, 3(C).  853 words.

Dunnavant, Anthony.  1999.  “‘Mountaineers Are Always Free’: The Stone-Campbell Traditions” [Barton Stone, Alexander Campbell; rooted in 1801 Cane Ridge, Ky., revival].  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 208-226.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Edmonds, Jesse (Rev.).  2005.  “Message from the Past” [1925-1996; transcript of a radio message/sermon, 1990, WALH Radio, Mountain City, Ga.].  Foxfire Magazine 39 (Fall/Winter): 98-103.

Ellis, John.  2010.  “The Confused, the Curious, and the Reborn: Methodism as a Youth Movement in the Upper South and Ohio Valley, 1770-1820.”  Ohio Valley History 10, no. 1 (Spring): 3-31.

Eslinger, Ellen.  1999.  Citizens of Zion: The Social Origins of Camp Meeting Revivalism [Ky.; 1775-1801].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  328 pp., 7 maps.

Fair, Holla Price.  2002.  “‘I’ve Done My Best’: Old-Time Preacher Denver Hill” [b. 1923; Boone Co.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 28 (Fall): 52-55.

Farley, Gary, and Bill J. Leonard.  1999.  “Mountain Preachers, Mountain Ministers.”  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 153-164.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Farley, Yvonne Snyder.  [1979] 1999.  “Holiness People Revisited” [serpent handling; Besoco Church of Jesus, Raleigh Co.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 25 (Summer): 10-19.  Reprint, originally published vol. 5, no. 2.

Flynt, Wayne. 2005. “Religion for the Blues: Evangelicalism, Poor Whites, and the Great Depression.” Journal of Southern History 71, no. 1: 3-38.

Fones-Wolf, Ken, et al.  2011.  Featured Rountable, “How might the study of religion in the early twentieth-century South appear differently if scholars emphasized class as a category of analysis?”  Journal of Southern Religion, vol. 13.  Papers: Embedding Class among the Troops Who Study Southern Religion / Ken Fones-Wolf -- The Work of Class in Southern Religion / Richard J. Callahan, Jr. -- Reading Religious Belief as Working-Class Intellectual History / Jarod Roll -- The Faith of the “flotsam and jetsam” / Alison Collis Greene -- Recovering the Class-Conscious New South / John Hayes -- plus “Responses” from each of the above participants.  http://jsr.fsu.edu/Volume13/Front13.html.

Ford, Bridget. “Beyond Cane Ridge: The ‘Great Western Revivals’ in Louisville and Cincinnati, 1828-1845.”  Ohio Valley History 8, no. 4 (Winter): 17-37.


Fox, Margalit.  2011.  “Swami Bhaktipada Dies at Age 74; Ex-Hare Krishna Leader and Felon” [obituary; b. Keith Ham, 1937].  New York Times, 25 October: 29(A).  1,355 words.  A 1959 graduate of Maryville College (Tenn.), Ham built New Vrindaban, the Palace of Gold, in the 1970s near Moundsville, W.Va.  He served eight years of a 12-year sentence for federal racketeering charges including conspiracy to commit the murders-for-hire of two devotees.

Fraley, Jill.  2011.  “Missionaries to the Wilderness: A History of Land, Identity, and Moral Geography in Appalachia.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 17, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 28-41.  Early 20th-century missionaries arrived with stereotypes of the people and mountains in this complex cultural exchange.

Gaitely, Patricia.  2009.  “‘It’s an Easy Life’: Women Serpent-Handlers in Contemporary Appalachia” [interviews].  North Carolina Folklore Journal 56, no. 2 (Fall-Winter): 52-64.

Genovese, Eugene D.  2002.  “The Dulcet Tones of Christian Disputation in the Democratic Up-Country” [Tenn.; Parson Brownlow].  Southern Cultures 8 (Winter): 56-68.

Grammich, Clifford A.  1994.  Appalachian Atlas: Maps of the  Churches and People of the Appalachian Region.  Knoxville:  Commission on Religion in Appalachia.  72 pp.

Grammich, Clifford A., Jr.  1999.  Local Baptists, Local Politics: Churches and Communities in the Middle and Uplands South [includes two case studies in Tenn. and Ky.].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  244 pp.

Harper, Keith.  2012.  “‘And All the Baptists in Kentucky Took the Name United Baptists’: The Union of the Separate and Regular Baptists of Kentucky.”  Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 110, no. 1 (Winter): 3-31.

Hayes, Mary.  2011.  “A Cove Creek Baptism” [pictorial].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 26, no. 2 (Winter): 62-65.  Ceder Creek Presbyterian Church, Greene County, Tenn.

Heyrman, Christine Leigh.  1997.  Southern Cross: The Beginnings of the Bible Belt [18th-19th century; evangelical dominance; winner of the 1998 Bancroft Prize].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  336 pp.

Hill, Samuel, ed.  2006.  Religion.  Vol. 1 of the New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  248 pp.  Seventy signed entries and short essays including: Appalachian religion -- Frontier religion -- Pentecostalism -- Campbell, Alexander -- Camps and retreats -- Fatalism -- Great Revival -- Merton, Thomas -- Moravians -- Serpent handlers -- Shakers.

Hill, Samuel S.  1999.  “The Virtue of Hope” [Appalachian religious traits].  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 297-311.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Hill, Telford (Jack), and Richard James Hill.  2008.  Colver: Mr. Coleman’s Town.  Pa: booksurge.com.  139 pp.  Ebensburg Coal company town history; Cambria County, Pa.

Hood, Ralph W., and W. Paul Williamson.  2008.  Them That Believe: The Power and Meaning of the Christian Serpent-Handling Tradition.  Berkeley: University of California Press.  301 pp.  Contents: “They shall take up serpents” -- The history of Pentecostalism absent the serpent -- The media and the man: George Went Hensley -- Serpent handling endorsed by the Church of God -- The serpent: sign and symbol -- Trance states: tongues speaking and the anointing -- Extemporaneous sermons in the serpent-handling tradition -- The experience of handling serpents -- The experience of the anointing -- Near-death experience from serpent bites in religious settings -- Music among serpent-handling churches -- Serpent handling and the law: history and empirical studies.

Hood, Ralph W., Jr., and W. P. Williamson.  2008.  “Contemporary Christian Serpent Handlers And The New Paradigm For The Psychology Of Religion.”  Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion 19: 59-89.

Houck, James.  2012.  “Finding a Voice: Affirming Religious Coping as a Strength among Disenfranchised Appalachians.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 18, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 189-205.  Tables.  “For people...who may already be disenfranchised by prejudice, ridicule, stigmatization, and socio-economic factors.”

Huddle, Mark Andrew.  1997.  Lift High the Cross: A Bicentennial History of the First Presbyterian Church, Morganton, North Carolina, 1797-1997.  Morganton, N.C.: First Presbyterian Church.  146 pp.

Huddle, Mark Andrew.  2005.  “Soul Winner: Edward O. Guerrant, the Kentucky Home Missions, and the ‘Discovery’ of Appalachia” [1870s-1890s].  Ohio Valley History 5, no. 4 (Winter): 47-64.

Jones, June Cowles.  2002.  “‘To Seek and Save’: Memories of Good Hope Church” [Missionary Baptist Church, Graydon, Fayette Co.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 28 (Spring): 50-53.

Jones, Loyal.  1999.  “Mountain Religion: An Overview.”  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 91-102.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Jones, Loyal.  1999.  Faith and Meaning in the Southern Uplands [Weatherford Award winner].  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.  264 pp.

Jones, Loyal.  2006.  “Appalachian Religion.”  In The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, Vol. 1: Religion, ed. S. Hill, 21-24.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  See also, “Serpent Handlers,” 211-212, by Steven M. Kane.

Kanon, Tom.  2007.  “‘Seduced, Bewildered, and Lost’: Anti-Shakerism on the Early Nineteenth-Century Frontier.”  Ohio Valley History 7, no. 2 (Summer): 1-30.

Keefe, Susan Emley.  2003.  “Religious Healing in Southern Appalachian Communities.”  In Southern Heritage on Display: Public Ritual and Ethnic Diversity within Southern Regionalism, ed. Celeste Ray, 144-166. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.

Kellison, Kimberly R.  2004.  “A Seceding State of Mind: The Antimission Controversy and the Roots of Secession in Upcountry South Ccarolina, 1820-1860.”  American Baptist Quarterly 23 no. 1 (March): 35-48.

Kellison, Kimberly R.  2005.  “Parameters of Promiscuity: Sexuality, Violence, and Religion in Upcountry South Carolina.”  Chap. 1 in Vale of Tears: New Essays on Religion and Reconstruction, ed. E. Blum and W. Poole, 15-35.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.

Ketchell, Aaron K.  2007.  Holy Hills of the Ozarks: Religion and Tourism in Branson, Missouri. Lived Religions.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.  300 pp.

Kimbrough, David L.  [1995] 2002.  Taking Up Serpents: Snake Handlers of Eastern Kentucky.  Reprint.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  232 pp.  Originally published: Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Kimbrough, David L., and Ralph W. Hood, Jr.  1995.  “Carson Springs and the Persistence of Serpent Handling Despite the Law.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 1 (Fall): 45-65.

Knochel, Mary Ann.  2007.  Roman Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh [photo retrospective].  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia. 127 pp.  Covers the Steel Valley and surrounding counties of southwestern Pa.

Laats, Adam.  2006.  “The Quiet Crusade: Moody Bible Institute’s Outreach to Public Schools and the Mainstreaming of Appalachia, 1921-66.”  Church History 75, no. 3 (September): 565-593.

Lamendola, Lauren.  2010.  “Trouble Brewing at St. Vincent” [Latrobe, Westmoreland Co.].  Pennsylvania History 93, no. 3 (Fall): 50-59.  Benedictines of St. Vincent Abbey, founded 1848 and now St. Vincent College, began brewing beer in 1860.  The brewery was mysteriously burned in 1926 during Prohibition.

Larson, Edward J.  1997.  Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America’s Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion.  New York: Basic Books.  336 pp.

Leonard, Bill J.  1996.  “Ministering to Appalachia” [AMERC: Appalachian Ministries Educational Resource Center - seminary consortium].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 13 (Winter): 12-14.

Leonard, Bill J.  1999.  “Introduction: The Faith and the Faiths.”  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, xv-xxxii.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Leonard, Bill J.  1999.  “Southern Baptists.”  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 175-188.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Leonard, Bill J.  2002.  “Baptists in Appalachia.”  Baptist History and Heritage 37 (no. 3): 6-25.

Leonard, Bill J., ed.  1999.  Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism [19 essays].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  328 pp.

Leppman, Elizabeth J.  2005.  “Appalachian Churchscapes: The Case of Menifee County, Kentucky” [“belief, attitude, and intentionality”; map, figures].  Southeastern Geographer 45, no. 1 (May):83-103.

Lewis, Michael.  2009.  “Keeping Sin from Sacred Spaces.”  Southern Cultures 15, no. 2 (Summer): 40-60.  Laws created by southern Evangelicals; alcohol.

Lienesch, Michael.  2007.  In the Beginning: Fundamentalism, the Scopes Trial, and the Making of the Antievolution Movement.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  338 pp.  Includes Chapter Six, “Staging: the Drama at Dayton” [Tenn.; 1925; creationism].

Lippy, Charles H.  1999.  “Popular Religiosity in Central Appalachia.”  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 40-51.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Long, Loretta M.  2001.  The Life of Selena Campbell: A Fellow Soldier in the Cause of Restoration [wife of Alexander Campbell, founder of Disciples of Christ (“Stone-Campbell Movement”)].  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  235 pp.

Longenecker, Stephen.  2002.  Shenandoah Religion: Outsiders and the Mainstream, 1716-1865.  Waco, Tex.: Baylor University Press.  192 pp.

Mansfield, Stephen, and George Grant.  1997.  Faithful Volunteers: The History of Religion in Tennessee.  Nashville, Tenn.: Cumberland House.  251 pp.

Marsich, David.  2011.  “‘And Shall thy Flowers Cease to Bloom?’: The Shakers’ Struggle to Preserve Pleasant Hill, 1862-1910.”  Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 109, no. 1 (Winter): 3-26.

Matzko, John.  2007.  “‘This is it, isn’t it, Brother Stone?’: The Move of Bob Jones University from Cleveland, Tennessee, to Greenville, 1946-1947.”  South Carolina Historical Magazine 108, no. 3 (July): 235-256.

McCauley, Deborah Vansau, and Laura E. Porter, with photographs by Warren E. Brunner.  2003.  Mountain Holiness: A Photographic Narrative [370 photos].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  224 pp.

McCauley, Deborah Vansau.  1995.  Appalachian Mountain Religion: A History [Weatherford Award winner].  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.  551 pp.

McCauley, Deborah Vansau.  1996.  “History Shapes the Present and Informs the Future” [author’s responses to last issue’s review essays of her book, Appalachian Mountain Religion: A History (University of Illinois Press, 1995), by Drake, Leonard, Rhodes, and Shinn].  Appalachian Heritage 24 (Spring): 10-25.

McCauley, Deborah Vansau.  1999.  “Mountain Holiness” [Holiness-Pentecostal movements].  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 103-116.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

McCauley, Deborah Vansau.  2004.  “Religion” [cultural survey].  In High Mountains Rising: Appalachia in Time and Place, ed. R. Straw and H. Blethen, 179-196.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

McDonald, Jeanne.  2004.  Review essay of The Serpent and the Spirit: Glenn Summerford’s Story, by Thomas Burton (University of Tennessee Press, 2004).  Appalachian Heritage 33 (Spring): 79-84.

McNeil, Lou F.  1999.  “Catholic Mission and Evangelization.”  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 257-277.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Mencken, H. L.  2006.  A Religious Orgy in Tennessee: A Reporter’s Account of the Scopes Monkey Trial [1925; Dayton, Tenn.].  Hoboken, N.J.: Melville House.  206 pp.  Includes Mencken’s 17 reports for The Baltimore Sun, The Nation, and The American Mercury in which he caricatures Protestant fundamentalist East Tennesseans and the anti-evolution movement, and sets stereotypes.

Menge, Ashley.  2005.  “‘Right-Standin’: An Interview with Reverence Ralph Bagwell” [b. 1932, Anderson, S.C.].  Foxfire Magazine 39 (Fall/Winter): 138-149.

Minney, Katrina.  2008.  “Leading Creek Baptist Church: Up From the Ashes in Gilmer County.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 34, no. 1 (Spring): 28-33.  Church built 1878, burned by an arsonist in 1980, rebuilt 1981.

Montagna, Douglas.  2007.  “‘Choked Him Til His Tongue Protruded’: Violence, the Code of Honor, and Methodist Clergy in the Antebellum Ohio Valley” [1830s-1850s].  Ohio Valley History 7, no. 4 (Winter): 15-31.

Morgan, Larry G.  2005.  Old Time Religion in the Southern Appalachians [Nantahala, Macon County, N.C.].  Boone, N.C.: Parkway Publishers, 2005.  137 pp.

Morgan, Larry G.  2006.  Old Time Religion in the Southern Appalachians [N.C.].  Boone, N.C.: Parkway Publishers.  137 pp.

Morgan, Robert.  1996.  “The Gift of Tongues.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 13 (Winter): 7.

Morrow, Jimmy.  2005.  Handling Serpents: Pastor Jimmy Morrow’s Narrative History of His Appalachian Jesus’ Name Tradition [Del-Rio, Tenn. (Cocke Co.); Big Stone Gap, Va.; Holiness Church].  Edited by Ralph W. Hood, Jr.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  207 pp.

Poage, Bennett.  1999.  “The Church and the Family Farm Ministry in Central Appalachia.”  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 18-39.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Pogue, Blair A.  1999.  “‘I Cannot Believe the Gospel That Is So Much Preached’: Gender, Belief, and Discipline in Baptist Religious Culture.”  In The Buzzel About Kentuck: Settling the Promised Land, ed. C. Friend, 216-241.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Posey, Lawton W.  2004.  “A City Preacher Comes to Pendleton County” [1958; summer seminary assignment; six-point preaching circuit].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 30 (Summer): 50-54.

Pyne, Tricia T.  2000.  Faith in the Mountains: A History of the Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston, 1850-2000 [W.Va.].  Strasbourg, France: Éditions de Signe.  128 pp.

Pyne, Tricia T.  2000.  Faith in the Mountains: A History of the Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston, 1850-2000 [W.Va.; Catholic Church].  Strasbourg, France: Editions de Signe.  128 pp.

Queen, Arthur.  2006.  A Country Preacher’s Tale: Time Has Made a Change in the Old Home Place.  Huntington, W.Va.: Mid-Atlantic Highlands.  174 pp.  Baptist, born 1920, Wayne County, W.Va.

Quinn, Kate.  2012.  “Fighting the Good Fight: Billy Sunday Comes to Wheeling” [evangelist; 1912].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 38, no. 2 (Summer): 50-57.

Rabun Churches [Rabun Co. Ga.; seven churches profiled].  2005.  Foxfire Magazine 39 (Fall/Winter): 152-155.

Rausch, John S.  1996.  “At Home in the Web of Life: Religious Values & Development.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 13 (Winter): 30-33.

Read, Ira.  1999.  “The Church College in Central Appalachia.”  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 73-90.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Reece, Erik.  2009.  An American Gospel: On Family, History, and the Kingdom of God.  New York: Riverhead Books.  224 pp.  A reflection and treatise on Christian religion by the son of a fundamentalist Baptist preacher and author of Lost Mountain: A Year in the Vanishing Wilderness: Radical Strip Mining and the Devastation of Appalachia (2006).

Reece, Erik.  2009.  An American Gospel: On Family, History, and the Kingdom of God.  New York: Riverhead Books.  224 pp.

Religion in Appalachia.  1996.  Special issue, Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 13 (Winter): 1-40.

Reynolds, David.  1994.  “Democracy and Religion: Dissension Among  the Primitive Baptists.”  Appalachian Journal 21 (Summer):  422-430.

Rice, James D.  2006.  “Evangelicals and the Invention of Community in Western Maryland” [late 18th and early 19th centuries].  Maryland Historical Magazine 101, no. 1: 26-54.

Ricketts, Jeremy R.  2008.  “Tennessee’s 1884 ‘Mormon Massacre’ and the Cane Creek Vigilante Movement” [Lewis Co.].  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 67, no. 3 (Fall): 208-235.

Rohrer, S. Scott.  2005.  Hope’s Promise: Religion and Acculturation in the Southern Backcountry [Moravian movement at Wachovia, Forsyth County, N.C., 1750-1860].  Religion and American Culture.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  266 pp.

Rutkowski, Ryan.  2010.  Catholic West Virginia [photo-retrospective].  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  127 pp.  Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston’s 160-year history.

Salatino, Anthony J.  2001.  A True Man of God: A Biography of Father Ralph William Beiting, Founder of the Christian Appalachian Project.  Edited with a foreword by Sidney Saylor Farr.  Ashland, Ky.: Jesse Stuart Foundation.  231 pp.

Schwartz, Scott.  1999.  Faith, Serpents, and Fire: Images of Kentucky Holiness Believers.  Foreword by Thomas Burton.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  128 pp.

Sessions, James.  1999.  “The Commission on Religion in Appalachia: Empowering the People” [”CORA”; founded 1965].  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 165-174.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Sherrod, Marc.  2005.  “Remembering the Dead, Comforting the Living: Adapting Christian Ministry to Appalachian Death Practices.”  Chap. 4 in Appalachian Cultural Competency: A Guide for Medical, Mental Health, and Social Service Professionals, ed. S. Keefe, 89-113.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Sims, Patsy.  [1988] 1996.  Can Somebody Shout Amen! Inside the Tents and Tabernacles of American Revivalists.  Religion in the South.  Reprint.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  234 pp.  Originally published: New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Smith, Chuck.  1998.  “Jehovah’s Witnesses and the Castor Oil Patriots: A West Virginia Contribution to Religious Liberty” [1940; Richwood; persecution].  West Virginia History 57: 95-110.

Smith, Lee, and Hal Crowther.  2004.  “‘All Wrought Up’: The Apocalyptic South of McKendree Robbins Long” [preacher-artist; 1888-1976].  Southern Cultures 10, no. 1 (Spring): 50-51.

Smith, Lee.  2004.  “Saturday Night and Sunday Morning” [preacher McKendree Robbins Long (1888-1976) and his Apocalyptic art].  Southern Cultures 10, no. 1 (Spring): 52-55.

Sparks, John.  2001.  The Roots of Appalachian Christianity: The Life and Legacy of Elder Shubal Stearns [1706-1771; Baptist preacher; Va., N.C.].  Religion in the South, no. 8.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  327 pp.

Sparks, John.  2005.  Raccoon John Smith: Frontier Kentucky’s Most Famous Preacher [1784-1868; Disciples of Christ].  By Elder John Sparks.  Religion in the South.  Lexington, Ky.: University Press of Kentucky.  462 pp.

Sparks, John.  2009.  Kentucky’s Most Hated Man: Charles Chilton Moore and the Blue Grass Blade [1837-1906].  Nicholasville, Ky.: Wind Publications.  332 pp.  A father of American atheism, newspaper editor of the Lexington, Ky., Blue Grass Blade, Bethany College (W.Va.) student, and grandson of religious reformer Barton W. Stone.

Specht, Neva Jean.  2003.  “Women of One or Many Bonnets? Quaker Women and the Role of Religion in Trans-Appalachian Settlement” [1790s Southwestern Pa.].  NWSA Journal 15 (Summer): 27-44.

Stephens, Randall J.  2008.  “‘There Is Magic in Print’: The Holiness-Pentecostal Press and the Origins of Southern Pentecostalism.”  In Southern Crossroads: Perspectives on Religion and Culture, ed. W. Conser and R. Payne, 194-230.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Stephens, Randall J.  2008.  The Fire Spreads: Holiness and Pentecostalism in the American South.  Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.  393 pp.

Super, Joe.  2012.  “Mountain Baptists, Mountain Theology” [W.Va.].  Baptist History & Heritage 47, no. 2 (Summer): 68-81.  Super takes issue with Deborah Vansau McCauley (Appalachian Mountain Religion, 1995).

Super, Joseph.  2012.  “Edward O. Guerrant and the Creation of the New South.”  Southern Historian 33 (Spring): 53-65.  “...discusses the views of...Guerrant on Christianity and capitalism in the U.S. South in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.”

Synan, Vinson.  [1971] 1997.  The Holiness-Pentecostal Tradition: Charismatic Movements in the Twentieth Century.  Second edition.  Grand Rapids, Mich.: W.B. Eerdmans.  340 pp.  Originally published as Holiness-Pentecostal Movement in the United States.

Taylor, Wilma Rugh.  2007.  “Glory Bound: Chapel Cars Come to West Virginia” [1890s-1946; railroad cars used by missionaries for church services].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 33, no. 4 (Winter): 28-33.

Thomas, Sarah.  2006.  “Five Timely Principles Survive a Century: The YMCA Blue Ridge Assembly at 100” [founder Dr. Willis Weatherford, Black Mountain, N.C.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 22, no. 2 (Fall/Winter): 19-22.

Thompson, Charles D., Jr.  2006.  The Old German Baptist Brethren: Faith, Farming, and Change in the Virginia Blue Ridge [Franklin Co.; oral history interviews].  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.  219 pp.

Tidball, Keith G., and Christopher P. Toumey.  2003.  “Signifying Serpents: Hermeneutic Change in Appalachian Pentecostal Serpent Handling.”  In Signifying Serpents and Mardi Gras Runners: Representing Identity in Selected Souths, ed. C. Ray and L. Lassiter, 1-18.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 36. Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Verburg, John L.  1994.  “Social Construction of Reality: How it Compels Action.”  In Appalachian Adaptations to a Changing World, ed. Norma Myers.  Journal of the Appalachian Studies Association 6: 99-112.  Johnson City: East Tennessee State University, Center for Appalachian Studies and Services.

Vincent, Peter., Morton D. Winsberg, and Barney Warf.  2006.  “Religious Diversity in the Southeastern U.S.” [44 denominations; tables; shaded county outline maps].  Southeastern Geographer 46, no. 1 (May): 79-96.

Voelker, David J.  2008.  “Church Building and Social Class on the Urban Frontier: The Refinement of Lexington, 1784-1830.”  Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 106, no. 2 (Spring): 181-229.  In contrast to the Great Revival and nearby Cane Ridge camp meeting of 1801.

Wagner, Melinda Bollar.  2006.  “Religion in Appalachia” [diversity; characteristics; with suggested readings].  In A Handbook to Appalachia: An Introduction to the Region, ed. G. Edwards, J. Asbury, and R. Cox, 181-197.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Weaver, Nikki.  2005.  “‘Crazy McCall’: An Interview with Rev. Delbert McCall” [b. 1946; Cashiers, N.C.].  Foxfire Magazine 39 (Fall/Winter): 111-127.

Webster, Gerald R.  2000.  “Geographical Patterns of Religious Denomination Affiliation in Georgia, 1970-1990: Population Change and Growing Urban Diversity” [shaded county outline maps].  Southeastern Geographer 40 (May): 25-51.

Welch, Janet Boggess.  1999.  “Uneven Ground: Cultural Values, Moral Standards, and Religiosity in the Heart of Appalachia.”  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 52-72.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

West, John Eric.  2004.  “Echoes of a Mountain Preacher: Recalling Laban Richmond of Summers County” [b. 1858; circuit rider].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 30 (Fall): 54-59.

Whitaker, Larry.  2004.  “Saints, Sinners, and Dinners on the Grounds: The Religious Legacy of the Upper Cumberland” [Ky., Tenn.].  In Rural Life and Culture in the Upper Cumberland, ed. M. Birdwell and W. Dickinson, 49-65.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Wigger, John H.  2009.  American Saint: Francis Asbury and the Methodists [biography; 1745-1816].  New York: Oxford University Press.  543 pp.  “Guided the creation of the American Methodist Church,” rode horseback 6000 miles per year, and crossed the Allegheny Mountains “sixty times,” “preaching daily.”

Williams, David S.  2008.  From Mounds to Megachurches: Georgia’s Religious Heritage. Athens: University of Georgia Press.  219 pp.

Witt, Joseph.  2011.  “Case Study: ‘Religion’ in Appalachian Environmental Struggles.”  Chap. 3 in Grounding Religion: A Field Guide to the Study of Religion and Ecology, ed. W. Bauman, R. Bohannon, and K. O’Brien, 41-46. New York: Routledge.  Mountaintop removal mining; W.Va.; discussion questions.

Yeuell, H. Davis, and Marcia Clark Myers.  1999.  “The Presbyterians in Central Appalachia.”  In Christianity in Appalachia: Profiles in Regional Pluralism, ed. B. Leonard, 189-207.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.