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Ethnicity and Race, African Americans, Immigrants, Native Americans

Includes Cherokee and Melungeon studies, segregation and slavery, immigrant settlers and laborers, black miners, Jews.

Adair, James.  2005 [1775].  The History of the American Indians [trader, ca.1709-1783;  southeastern Indians; Catawba, Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, and Chickasaw].  Edited by Kathryn E. Holland Braund.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  589 pp.  Originally published: London: Edward and Charles Dilly.

Adams, Mikaela M.  2012.  “Residency and Enrollment: Diaspora and the Catawba Indian Nation.”  South Carolina Historical Magazine 13, no. 1 (January): 24-49.

African-American Appalachian Issue [articles, poetry, fiction, book review, bibliography, photos].  2008.  Special issue, Appalachian Heritage 36, no. 3 (Summer): 1-124.  Guest co-editor, William H. Turner; “This issue dedicated to Ed Cabbell, Pioneer in African-American Appalachian Studies.” Includes 22 poems by Afrilachian poets and Effie Waller Smith (1879-1960).

Ailes, Jane, and Marie Tyler-McGraw.  2012.  “Leaving Virginia for Liberia: Western Virginia Emigrants and Emancipators” [1830s-1860s].  West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, new series, vol. 6, no. 2 (Fall): 1-34.  Tables.  “...colonization proved inadequate and even harmful to many.”

Alexander, J. Trent.  1998.  “The Great Migration in Comparative Perspective: Interpreting the Urban Origins of Southern Black Migrants to Depression-Era Pittsburgh.”  Social Science History 22 (Fall): 349-376.

Alonso, Rosalyn Queen.  2009.  “Growing Up Italian” [b. 1939].  Traditions: A Journal of West Virginia Folk Culture and Educational Awareness 11: 34-35.  Author profile on page 61.

Alther, Lisa.  2007.  Kinfolks: Falling Off the Family Tree: The Search for my Melungeon Ancestors.  New York: Arcade.  241 pp.

Altman, Heidi M.  2006.  Eastern Cherokee Fishing [central to cultural identity, language; Western N.C.].  Contemporary American Indian Studies.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  138pp.

Altman, Heidi M., and Thomas N. Belt.  2011.  “Moving Around in the Room: Cherokee Language, Worldview and Memory.”  In Museums and Memory: Selected Papers from the Annual Meeting of the Southern Anthropological Society, Staunton, Virginia, March, 2008, ed. M. Huber, 227-233.  Knoxville, Tenn.: Newfound Press.

Altman,Heidi M., and Thomas N. Belt.  2008.  “Reading History: Cherokee History through a Cherokee Lens.”  Native South 1: 90-98.  Relationships between language, culture, and thought.

Alvarez, Raymond.  2009.  “La Familia Fernandez: Recalling a Spanish Family in Clarksburg.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 35, no. 3 (Fall): 19-23.  Author’s grandparents immigrated from Asturias, Spain, in 1913 and 1917.  Sidebar: “The Spanish Picnic” [annually 1930s-60s, Morris Park, Fairmont, W.Va.; recipe for Rice Paella], 24-25.

Alzo, Lisa A.  2001.  Three Slovak Women [follows three generations; steel town Duquesne, Pa.; mill/miner immigrants].  Baltimore, Md.: Gateway Press.  111 pp.

Anglin, Mary K.  2004.  “Erasures of the Past: Culture, Power, and Heterogeneity in Appalachia” [African Americans, Cherokees, Melungeons].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 10 (Spring/Fall): 73-84.

Ansley, Fran, and Anne Lewis.  2011.  “Going South, Coming North: Migration and Union Organizing in Morristown, Tennessee.”  Southern Spaces: An Interdisciplinary Journal about Regions, Places, and Cultures of the American South and Their Global Connections, 19 May 2011.  “This multimedia essay augments the 2007 Appalshop film ‘Morristown: In the Air and Sun’.”  Contents: Introduction | Going South: A Trip to the Maquiladoras | Coming North: The Long Hard Crossing | Arriving in Morristown: New Kinds of Borders | Organizing in a Southern Industry: Immigrants Step Up | Looking Back and Ahead | Recommended Resources.  http://www.southernspaces.org/2011/going-south-coming-north-migration-and-union-organizing-morristown-tennessee.

Apperson, George M.  2000.  “African Americans on the Tennessee Frontier: John Gloucester and His Contemporaries.”  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 59 (Spring): 2-19.

Arch-Smoker, Sallie.  2009.  “New Language.”  Appalachian Heritage 37, no. 4 (Fall): 98-99.  Confronting English language as a first-grader when the author’s first language was Cherokee (Tsalagi).

Aretha, David.  2007.  The Trial of the Scottsboro Boys [1931 rape trial; juvenile literature].  Civil Rights Series.  Greensboro, N.C.: Morgan Reynolds.  128 pp.

Argeo, Luis.  2009.  “Asturian West Virginia.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 35, no. 3 (Fall): 14-18.  Immigrants from the Asturias province of Spain came by the thousands to Harrison and Marion Counties to work in the zinc factories in the early 20th century.

Armstead, Robert, as told to S. L. Gardner.  2002.  Black Days, Black Dust: The Memories of an African American Coal Miner [1927-2002; Marion Co., W.Va.].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  272 pp.

Atkinson, James R.  2004.  Splendid Land, Splendid People: The Chickasaw Indians to Removal [Miss., upper Tombigbee River].  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  366 pp.

Augusté, N. N.  2010.  “A Lifetime of Devotion: The T. J. Blumer Collection on the Catawba Nation, 1756–Present.”  Native South 3: 118-124.  Pottery, oral histories, personal diaries, papers, and photographs.

Bailey, Anne J.  2006.  “The War Within: The Divided Loyalties of Native Americans.”  Chap. 2 in Invisible Southerners: Ethnicity in the Civil War, 24-46.  Jack N. and Addie D. Averitt Lecture Series, no. 14.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Bailey, Kenneth R.  2002.  “Strange Tongues: West Virginia and Immigrant Labor to 1920” [tables].  In Transnational West Virginia: Ethnic Communities and Economic Change, 1840-1940, ed. K. Fones-Wolf and R. Lewis, 242-258.  West Virginia and Appalachia series, no. 1.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.

Bailey, Kenneth R.  2009.  “The Other Brown v. Board of Education.”  West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, new series, vol. 3, no. 2 (Fall): 53-73.  Black opposition to segregation of Charleston’s public library, 1923-1956.

Bailey, Ruth Knight.  2004.  “Lost Tribes: Indian Mormons in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia” [Amherst, Rockbridge, Nelson Cos.].  In CrossRoads: A Southern Culture Annual, ed. Ted Olson, 135-169.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.

Baine, Rodney M.  1995.  “Indian Slavery in Colonial Georgia.”  Georgia Historical Quarterly 74 (Summer): 418-424.

Baker, Chris.  2012.  “Hillbilly Norte: Latino Communities and Institutions in Change in Rural East Tennessee” [Morristown].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 28, no. 1 (Summer): 14-16.

Ballard, Ross.  2002.  “Doing Fine at 99: A Visit With Melvin Harris” [former miner, teacher; McDowell Co.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 28 (Spring): 30-35.

Banks, James W.  2004.  The Call of the Hawk [fiction; 1779 Shawnee Indian captivity, based on a true story].  Baltimore: PublishAmerica.  310 pp.

Banks, Jay.  2005.  The Call of the Hawk [fiction].  Baltimore, Md.: PublishAmerica.  310 pp.  Shawnee Indian captivity, based on the author’s great-great-great grandmother’s life; 1786-1810, Greenbrier Valley, (W.)Va.

Banks, William H., Jr.  2004.  Plants of the Cherokee: Medicinal, Edible, and Useful Plants of the Eastern Cherokee Indians [1950s masters thesis].  Gatlinburg, Tenn.: Great Smoky Mountains Association.  149 pp.

Bankston, Carl L.  2007.  “New People in the New South: An Overview of Southern Immigration” [history; table from 2000 Census].  Southern Cultures 13, no. 4 (Winter): 24-44.

Banner, Stuart.  2005.  How the Indians Lost Their Land: Law and Power on the Frontier. Cambridge, Mass: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.  344 pp.

Barcus, Holly.  2007.  “The Emergence of New Hispanic Settlement Patterns in Appalachia” [population tripled, 1980-2000; tables; shaded county outline maps].  Professional Geographer 59, no. 3 (August): 298-315.

Barkey, Frederick A.  2002.  “‘Here Come the Boomer ’Talys’: Italian Immigrants and Industrial Conflict in the Upper Kanawha Valley, 1903-1917” [coal; strikes].  In Transnational West Virginia: Ethnic Communities and Economic Change, 1840-1940, ed. K. Fones-Wolf and R. Lewis, 160-189.  West Virginia and Appalachia series, no. 1.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.

Barnard, Susan K., and Grace M. Schwartzman.  1998.  “Tecumseh and the Creek Indian War of 1813-1814 in North Georgia.”  Georgia Historical Quarterly 82 (Fall): 489-506.

Barnes, Jodi.  2011.  “An Archaeology of Community Life: Appalachia, 1865-1920” [Amherst Co., Va.].  International Journal Of Historical Archaeology 15, no. 4 (December): 669-706.  Maps, tables, photos.  History of post-emancipation African American families who built a community in Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains.

Barnes, Jodi.  2011.  “Land Rich and Cash Poor: The Materiality of Poverty in Appalachia.”  Historical Archaeology 45, no. 3: 26-40.  Blue Ridge Va., 1865-1920; considers “intersections of poverty, race, and class in the material lives of African American landowners and tenants.”

Barr, Daniel P.  2006.  “‘A Road for Warriors’: The Western Delawares and the Seven Years War” [differentiated from the Eastern Delawares and the Ohio Indians].  Pennsylvania History 73, no. 1 (Winter): 1-36.

Barr, Daniel P.  2006.  “‘This Land Is Ours and Not Yours’: The Western Delawares and the Seven Years’ War in the Upper Ohio Valley, 1755-1758.”  Chap. 2 in The Boundaries between Us: Natives and Newcomers along the Frontiers of the Old Northwest Territory, 1750-1850, ed. D. Barr, 25-43.  Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press.

Barr, Daniel P., ed.  2006.  The Boundaries between Us: Natives and Newcomers along the Frontiers of the Old Northwest Territory, 1750-1850 [Ohio River Valley; 11 chapters].  Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press.  261 pp.

Barrick, Michael.  1998.  “An Appetite for Life” [Italian-Americans and eating in Clarksburg, W.Va.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 15 (Spring): 3-5.

Bartoletti, Susan Campbell. 2000.  A Coal Miner’s Bride: The Diary of Annetka Kaminska: Lattimer,Pennsylvania, 1896.  [Polish immigrants; Pa. anthracite region; young readers historical fiction].  Dear America series.  New York: Scholastic.  219 pp.

Bartram, William.  2002.  William Bartram On the Southeastern Indians [1739-1823].  Edited by Gregory A. Waselkov and Kathryn E. Braund.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  360 pp.

Basile, Victor A.  2009.  “The Making of ‘Little Italys’ in the Appalachian Hills of West Virginia” [Clarksburg].  Traditions: A Journal of West Virginia Folk Culture and Educational Awareness 11: 44-49.

Battlo, Jean.  1997.  “Mining in the Melting Pot: The African American Influx into the McDowell County Mines.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 23 (Winter): 46-51.

Battlo, Jean.  1999.  “‘Lavoro e Casa’: Memories of an Italian Mining Family” [McDowell Co.; immigrated 1914].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 25 (Spring): 48-55.

Battlo, Jean.  2011.  “Kimball’s War Memorial” [McDowell Co.; WWI; dedicated 1928 in reaction to a 1923 memorial that had excluded blacks].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 37, no. 1 (Spring): 44-45.  “By 1910, McDowell County had the largest concentration of African Americans in the Appalachian region, representing 35% of the labor force in the Pocahontas coalfield.  When World War I broke out, approximately 1,500 McDowell County blacks left the mines to serve in the armed forces.”

Bauer, Margaret D.  2005.  “‘[He] didn’t come here on the Mayflower’: A Defense of Alex Haley’s Roots” [Doubleday (1976); Haley’s papers are in University of Tennessee archives].  In Crossroads: A Southern Culture Annual, ed. Ted Olson, 377-401.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.

Beard-Moose, Christina Taylor.  2009.  Public Indians, Private Cherokees: Tourism and Tradition on Tribal Ground.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  185 pp.  Contents: Researching the obvious: tourism and the Eastern Cherokee -- The trail of tourism -- Academic perspectives on tourism and the case of Cherokee, North Carolina -- Eastern Cherokee ingenuity -- Disneyfication on the boundary -- Mass tourism’s effects on indigenous communities -- Epilogue: An Eastern Cherokee renaissance.

Beasley, Brenda Gale.  2002.  “‘Trail of the Whispering Giants’: One Man’s Monumental Tribute” [Peter Toth’s numerous, giant, carved, Indian-head statues, include Sequoyah in his 50-state series].  North Carolina Folklore Journal 49 (Fall/Winter): 52-64.

Beaver, Patricia D., and Helen M. Lewis.  1998.  “Uncovering the Trail of Ethnic Denial: Ethnicity in Appalachia” [whiteness; class; ethnicity].  In Cultural Diversity in the U.S. South: Anthropological Contributions to a Region in Transition, ed. C. Hill and P. Beaver, 51-68.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 31.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Beck, Monica L.  1998.  “‘A Fer Ways Off from the Big House’: The Changing Nature of Slavery in the South Carolina Backcountry” [York Co.].  In The Southern Colonial Backcountry: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Frontier Communities, ed. D. Crass, et al., 108-136.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Beckerman, Ira.  2006.  “Tribal Consultation in Pennsylvania: A Personal View from Within the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation” [burial sites; National Historic Preservation Act; Seneca, Cayuga, and Delaware tribes].  Chap. 12 in Cross-Cultural Collaboration: Native Peoples and Archaeology in the Northeastern United States, ed. J. Kerber, 183-196.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Beers, Paul G.  1994.  “The Wythe County Lynching of Raymond Bird: Progressivism vs. Mob Violence in the ‘20s.”  Appalachian  Journal 22 (Fall): 34-59.

Beik, Mildred Allen.  2002.  “The Significance of the Lattimer Massacre: Who Owns Its History?” [1897; immigrants].  Pennsylvania History 69 (Winter): 58-70.

Belt, Roseanna S.  2010.  “Jerry Wolfe: Cherokee Elder” [b. 1924, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; 2010 Brown-Hudson Folklore Award winner].  North Carolina Folklore Journal 57, no. 2 (Fall-Winter): 19-21.

Belton, Sandra.  2000.  McKendree [juvenile fiction; 1948 W.Va.; African-American girl’s coming-of-age story].  New York: Greenwillow.  262 pp.

Bender, Margaret C.  2002.  “The Gendering of Langue and Parole: Literacy in Cherokee” [1820s syllabary].  In Southern Indians and Anthropologists: Culture, Politics, and Identity, ed. L. Lefler and F. Gleach, 77-88.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 35.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Besmann, Wendy Lowe.  2002.  A Separate Circle: Jewish Life in Knoxville, Tennessee.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  216 pp.

Bess, Michael K.  2012.  “Obreros in the Peach State: The Growth of Georgia’s Working-Class Mexican Immigrant Communities from a Transnational Perspective” [Dalton].  In Life and Labor in the New New South, ed. R. Zieger, 214-235.  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.

Bickley, Ancella R.  1997.  “Dubie, Spanky, and Mr. Death: West Virginia’s Pioneering Black Airmen” [W.Va.’s Tuskegee Airmen].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 23 (Summer): 42-44.

Bickley, Ancella R.  2001.  “Camp War: Remembering CCC Company 3538-C” [McDowell Co.; 1935-1942; all-black Civilian Conservation Corps camp].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 27 (Winter): 22-29.

Bickley, Ancella R.  2001.  In Spite of Obstacles: A History of The West Virginia Schools for the Colored Deaf and Blind, 1926-1955.  Charleston: West Virginia Department of Education and the Arts, Division of Rehabilitation Service.  88 pp.

Bickley, Ancella R.  2003.  “Lafadie Belle Whittico: Black Medical Pioneer in Mingo County” [b. 1911; first black nurse, 1930s].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 29 (Winter): 40-45.

Bickley, Ancella R.  2004.  “‘Lifting as We Climb’: Charleston Woman’s Improvement League” [black women’s service organization, founded 1898].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 30 (Winter): 54-59.

Bickley, Ancella R.  2008.  “Carter G. Woodson: The West Virginia Connection” [1875-1950].  Appalachian Heritage 36, no. 3 (Summer): 58-69.  “The Father of Black History”; special issue–“African-American Appalachia”

Bickley, Ancella.  2002.  “The West Virginia Schools for the Colored Deaf and Blind” [Institute, W.Va.; 1926-1955].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 28 (Fall): 22-23.

Bickley, Ancella.  2006.  “Education and Activism in Gary: A Visit with Jessie Moon Thomas” [African American; b. 1913; taught 42 years in McDowell Co.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 32, no. 4 (Winter): 32-37.

Bickley, Ancella.  2011.  “General Edward Greer: West Virginia’s First Black General” [b. 1924, McDowell Co.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 37, no. 4 (Winter): 42-47.  Memories of segregated towns, Gary and Welch; served in Korea and Vietnam.

Biggers, Jeff.  2012.  “Valley Girl: Appalachia’s Future Poet Laureate Takes on Mountaintop Removal.”  Huffington Post (blog), 29 May.  475 words.  Brief review of W.Va. Affrilachian writer Crystal Good’s new chapbook, Valley Girl, with a four-minute video clip of Good reading her poem, “Boom Boom.”  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jeff-biggers/crystal-good-poetry-_b_1554062.html.

Bigham, Darrel E.  2006.  On Jordan’s Banks: Emancipation and Its Aftermath in the Ohio River Valley [Ashland, Ky., to Cairo, Ill.; African American life: border states; slavery].  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  428 pp.

Bigham, Darrel E.  2006.  Review Essay of Frontiers of Freedom: Cincinnati’s Black Community, 1802-1868, by Nikki Marie Taylor (Ohio University Press, 2005) [with narrative bibliography of related regional titles].  Ohio Valley History 6, no. 2 (Summer): 41-47.

Bilharz, Joy A.  1998.  The Allegany Seneca and Kinzua Dam: Forced Relocation Through Two Generations [1960s dam project; displacement of Seneca Indians;  Cattaraugus Co., N.Y.].  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  194 pp.

Billingsley, Carolyn Earle.  2004.  “Melungeons: A Study in Racial Complexity.”  Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 102, no. 2 (Spring): 207-223.  Review essay of Wayne Winkler’s Walking Toward the Sunset: The Melungeons of Appalachia (Mercer University Press, 2004).

Birchfield, D. L.  2009.  “Robert J. Conley: Extraordinary Cherokee Author” [b. 1940].  Appalachian Heritage 37, no. 4 (Fall): 19-24.

Black, Samuel W.  2002. “African American Quilters of Western Pennsylvania.”  Western Pennsylvania History 85 (Winter 2002-2003): 26-31.

Black, Samuel.  2010.  “America’s Best Weekly: 110 Years of the Pittsburgh Courier.”  Western Pennsylvania History 93, no. 1 (Spring): 22-29.  At one time the country’s most widely-circulated black newspaper, first published January, 1910.

Blakeman, Scott.  1996.  “Night Comes to Berea College: The Day Law and the African-American Reaction” [Berea, Ky.].  Filson Club Quarterly 70 (January): 3-26.

Blanton, Sherry. 1999. “Lives of Quiet Affirmation: The Jewish Women of Early Anniston, Alabama” [role of women in Jewish communal organization].  Southern Jewish History 2: 225-253.

Blaustein, Richard.  2003.  The Thistle and the Brier: Historical Links and Cultural Parallels between Scotland and Appalachia [dialect and identity politics].  Contributions to Southern Appalachian Studies, no. 7.  Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland.  174 pp.

Blee, Kathleen M., and Dwight B. Billings.  2001.  “Race and the Roots of Appalachian Poverty: Clay County, Kentucky, 1850-1910” [Beech Creek study].  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 165-188.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Previously published under a different title in Social Science History 20 (1996): 345-373.

Blee, Kathleen M., and Dwight B. Billings.  1996.  “Race Differences in the Origins and Consequences of Chronic Poverty in Rural Appalachia.”  Social Science History 20 (Fall): 345-373.

Blethen, H. Tyler, and Curtis W. Wood, Jr.  1998.  From Ulster to Carolina: The Migration of the Scotch-Irish to Southwestern North Carolina. Rev. ed.  Raleigh: North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, Division of Archives and History.  Published in cooperation with the Appalachian Consortium, Boone, N.C.  71 pp.

Blethen, Tyler.  2002.  “Museum of the Cherokee Indian, Qualla Boundary” [2001 Community Tradition Award winner].  North Carolina Folklore Journal 49 (Spring/Summer): 43-44.

Blumer, Thomas J.  2004.  Catawba Indian Pottery: The Survival of a Folk Tradition. Contemporary American Indian Studies.  University of Alabama Press.  223 pp.

Boudinot, Elias, and Harriett Gold Boudinot.  2005.  To Marry an Indian: The Marriage of Harriett Gold and Elias Boudinot in Letters, 1823-1839 [Ga.; Cherokee].  Edited by Theresa Strouth Gaul.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  222 pp.

Boudinot, Elias.  [1983] 1996.  Cherokee Editor: The Writings of Elias Boudinot.  Edited, with an introduction, by Theda Perdue.  Reprint.  Athens: University of Georgia Press. 243 pp.  Originally published: Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Boulware, Tyler.  2007.  “The Effect of the Seven Years’ War on the Cherokee Nation.”  Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 5, no. 2 (Fall): 395-426.

Boulware, Tyler.  2011.  Deconstructing the Cherokee Nation: Town, Region, and Nation among Eighteenth-Century Cherokees.  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.  234 pp.  Contents: Town, region, and nation -- “The antient friendship and union”: the Anglo-Cherokee alliance -- “In constant hostility with the Muskohge”: the Cherokee-Creek War -- “The disaffected people of great Tellico”: the struggle for empire in a Cherokee town -- “In a discontented mood”: the crisis in Virginia -- “Every town wept for some”: the Anglo-Cherokee War -- “Now all our talks are about lands”: unstable borderlands -- “Half war half peace”: the American Revolution in Cherokee country -- Epilogue: toward the Cherokee Nation.

Bourgeois, Ashley.  2010.  “Don’t Call It a Museum...: Director André Guess Talks About His Plans for the New August Wilson Center” [Pittsburgh (Hill District) playwright; 1945-2005].  Pluck: The Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture, no. 5: 38-41.

Bowes, John P.  2007.  Exiles and Pioneers: Eastern Indians in the Trans-Mississippi West [Removal histories: Shawnee, Delaware, Wyandot, and Potawatomi].  Studies in North American Indian History.  New York: Cambridge University Press.  272 pp.

Boyd, C. Clifford, Jr.  2004.  “Native Americans” [Cherokees].  In High Mountains Rising: Appalachia in Time and Place, ed. R. Straw and H. Blethen, 7-16.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Boyd, Robert.  2001.  “Colored Me” [1930s-40s East Tenn.].  In Breathing the Same Air: An East Tennessee Anthology, ed. D. Ivie and L. LaChance, 262-270.  Knoxville, Tenn.: Celtic Cat Publishing.

Boyd, Robert.  2007.  “The Colored Folk Churches in East Tennessee” [memoir].  Appalachian Heritage 35, no. 4 (Fall): 89-93.

Brattain, Michelle.  2001.  The Politics of Whiteness: Race, Workers, and Culture in the Modern South [Rome and Floyd Cos., Ga., textile workers; 1900-1960s].  Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.  301 pp.

Braund, Kathryn E. Holland, and Charlotte M. Porter, ed.  2010.  Fields of Vision: Essays on the Travels of William Bartram.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  273 pp.  Contents: 14 chapters including: The real world of Bartram’s Travels / Edward J. Cashin -- William Bartram, Wrightsborough, and the prospects for the Georgia backcountry, 1765-1774 / Robert Scott Davis -- Where Bartram sat: historic Creek Indian architecture in the eighteenth century / Craig T. Sheldon, Jr. -- E. G. Squier’s manuscript copy of William Bartram’s Observations on the Creek and Cherokee Indians / Mark Williams.

Brennan, Margaret.  1999.  “Wheeling’s Irish Thread: An O’Brien Family Tale” [W.Va.; forebears of musicians Tim and Molly O’Brien].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 25 (Spring): 18-25.

Brewer, John M.  2006.  African Americans in Pittsburgh [photo retrospective]. Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  127 pp.  “Photographs captured by famed [Pittsburgh Courier] photographer Charles ‘Teenie’ Harris show the candid experiences of residents.”

Breyer, Stephen.  2003.  “The Cherokee Indians and the Supreme Court” [Cherokee lawsuits against Ga. preceding 1836 Removal; U.S. Supreme Court Justice’s keynote address at annual meeting of Georgia Historical Society, April 6, 2002].  Georgia Historical Quarterly 87 (Fall & Winter): 408-426.

Brignano, Mary.  2009.  Boundless Lives: Italian Americans of Western Pennsylvania.  Pittsburgh: Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania.  213 pp.  “More than 100 immigrants and their descendants recall the years of separation...and most of all, the bonds of family.”

Brodwin, Paul.  2005.  “‘Bioethics in Action’ and Human Population Genetics Research” [Human Genome Diversity Project and Melungeons].  Culture, Medicine & Psychiatry 29, no. 2 (June): 145-178.

Brooks, Elizabeth.  1997.  “Elusive Neighbors” [Amish; Lawrence Co., Western Pa.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 14 (Winter): 5-7.

Brosi, George, comp.  2008.  “Bibliography of African-American Appalachian Books.”  Appalachian Heritage 36, no. 3 (Summer): 109-115.  Special issue–“African-American Appalachia.”  Sixty-five items listed under the following headings: Biography, Children’s Books, Civil Rights, Coal, Essays, Literary Criticism, Local History, Novels, Poetry, Scholarly Studies, Short Stories, Slavery.

Brosi, George.  2006.  “A Black Appalachian Treasure” [author Crystal Wilkinson, b. 1962, Casey Co., Ky.].  Appalachian Heritage 34, no. 2 (Spring): 8-12.

Brown, James W., and Rita T. Kohn.  2008.  Long Journey Home: Oral Histories of Contemporary Delaware Indians.  Bloomington: Indiana University Press.  416 pp.

Brown, Les M.  2000.  “The Crime of Malachia Hayden: The Loss of Black Community” [race relations; North Cove, McDowell Co., N.C.].  Appalachian Journal 27 (Spring): 250-259.

Brown, Les M., and Joyce Compton Brown.  1998.  “Riding the Rail to Legend: The North Cove ‘Tally War’ As Show of Force, As Manipulated Account, As Oral History” [N.C.; 1906; treatment of Italian railroad workers].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 4 (Fall): 225-238.

Brown, M. Christopher, II.  2002.  “Good Intentions: Collegiate Desegregation and Transdemographic Enrollments” [Bluefield State College history; W.Va.].  Review of Higher Education 25 (Spring): 263-280.

Brown, Mary.  2009.  “Mary Brown’s Great-Grandmother’s Recipe for Apple Stack Cake.”  Appalachian Heritage 37, no. 4 (Fall): 112-113.  Accompanying poem, “Janie Picks Apples on Tuesday,” p. 111.  Mary Brown is a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokees.

Brown, Phil, ed.  2002.  In the Catskills: A Century of Jewish Experience in “the Mountains”. [44 essays].  New York: Columbia University Press.  415 pp.

Brown, Ryan A., Daniel J. Hruschka, and Carol M. Worthman.  2009.  “Cultural Models and Fertility Timing among Cherokee and White Youth in Appalachia: Beyond the Mode.”  American Anthropologist 111, no. 4 (December): 420-431.

Brown, Ryan, et al.  2008.  “Cultural and Community Determinants of Subjective Social Status among Cherokee and White Youth” [tables].  Ethnicity & Health 13, no. 4 (September): 289-303.

Bruchac, Joseph, and Gayle Ross.  1995.  The Story of the Milky Way: A Cherokee Tale [children’s literature].  Paintings by Virginia A. Stroud.  New York: Dial Books for Young Readers.  30 pp.

Bruchac, Joseph.  2001.  The Journal of Jesse Smoke: A Cherokee Boy [juvenile fiction; 1838 Trail of Tears].  My Name is America.  New York: Scholastic.  203 pp.

Brundage, W. Fitzhugh.  2001.  “Racial Violence, Lynchings, and Modernization in the Mountain South.”  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 302-316.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Bumgardner, Stan.  2011.  “In the Beginning...: South Charleston’s Belgian Roots” [glassworkers, early 1900s].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 37, no. 4 (Winter): 16-23.  Banner Glass operated a Belgian cooperative, 1907-1920.  Sidebar on “Hand-Blown Window Glass,” 19.  Sidebar, “Remembrances of Grandma and Grandpa Dumont,” by Edgar Dumont, Jr., 22-23.

Burchett, Michael H.  1997.  “Promise and Prejudice: Wise County, Virginia and the Great Migration, 1910-1920.”  Journal of Negro History 82 (Summer): 312-327.

Burin, Eric.  2006.  “A Manumission in the Mountains: Slavery and the African Colonization Movement in Southwestern Virginia” [Christiansburg, 1847].  Appalachian Journal 33, no. 2 (Winter): 164-186.

Burke, Diane Mutti.  2010.  On Slavery’s Border: Missouri’s Small-Slaveholding Households, 1815-1865.  Early American Places series.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  413 pp.

Burnett, Nancy Svet.  2000.  “‘Where the Rails Turn Up’: Slovenes Come to Richwood”  [1920s-40s; timber and coal boom town].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 26 (Winter): 38-45.

Burris, Theresa L.  2009.  “New World and Third World Confluence: The New Historicist/Colonial Poetry of Affrilachian Frank X Walker.”.  The Iron Mountain Review 25 (Spring): 11-17.

Burriss, Theresa L.  2006.  “Enticing Readers to Stretch” [critiques Affrilachian author Crystal Wilkinson’s book of stories, Water Street (2002)].  Appalachian Heritage 34, no. 2 (Spring): 37-43.

Burriss, Theresa L.  2010.  “No Break between Yesterday and Today: A Profile of West Virginia Poet Norman Jordan.”  Pluck: The Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture, no. 5: 42-45.

Burstin, Barbara Stern.  2008.  Steel City Jews: A History of Pittsburgh and Its Jewish Community, 1840-1915.  Pittsburgh, Pa.(?): Barbara S. Burstin.  366 pp.

Butcher, Jamie.  2005.  “Religion, Race, Gender, and Education: The Allen School, Asheville, North Carolina, 1885 to 1974” [home mission school for black Appalachian girls].  Appalachian Journal 33, no. 1 (Fall): 78-109.

Byer, Alan.  2010.  “Visiting the Balli Sisters of Helvetia.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 36, no. 2 (Summer): 10-17.  Swiss-Americans, renowned for their cheese making, whose immigrant father built a 200-acre mountaintop farm, Balli Ridge, in 1870s Randolph County.

Byers, A. Martin, and DeeAnne Wymer.  2010.  Hopewell Settlement Patterns, Subsistence, and Symbolic Landscapes.  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.  406 pp.

Byers, A. Martin.  2004.  The Ohio Hopewell Episode: Paradigm Lost and Paradigm Gained [Ohio River Valley].  Series on Ohio History and Culture.  Akron, Ohio: University of Akron Press.  674 pp.

Cadavid, Mauricio.  2012.  “The Work I Do” [Barrow Co., Ga.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 28, no. 1 (Summer): 8-10.  The author discusses the adjustment from his native Columbia to the foothills of north Georgia.

Caldwell, A. B.  [1923] 2012.  History of the American Negro: West Virginia Edition [biographies of 118 black West Virginians, 1863-1923].  With a new introduction by Joe Trotter.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.  352 pp.  Originally published: Atlanta, Ga.: A. B. Caldwell Publishing Co.

Calhoun, Walker.  1995.  “Walker Calhoun: Cherokee Song and Dance Man.”  Interview by Ted Olson.  Appalachian Journal 23 (Fall): 70-77.

Calloway, Colin G.  2007.  The Shawnees and the War for America [Ohio Valley; 18th-century].  The Penguin Library of American Indian History.  New York: Viking.  216 pp.

Calloway, Colin G.  2008.  White People, Indians, and Highlanders: Tribal Peoples and Colonial Encounters in Scotland and America.  New York: Oxford University Press.  368 pp.  Frontier shared struggles and interactions, 18th-century.

Campbell, Roberta M., section editor.  2006.  “Race, Ethnicity, and Identity” [signed entries].  In Encyclopedia of Appalachia, ed. R. Abramson and J. Haskell, 240-283 (with introductory essay, 240-245).  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Campet, Fidel M.  2012.  “Black Pittsburgh’s Struggle to Maintain Citizenship Rights, 1790-1838.”  Western Pennsylvania History 94, no. 4 (Winter 2012-2013): 34-43.

Canady, Andrew McNeil.  2009.  “The Limits to Improving Race Relations in the South: The YMCA Blue Ridge Assembly in Black Mountain, North Carolina, 1906-1930.”  North Carolina Historical Review 86, no. 4 (October): 404-436.

Cantrell, Roy H.  2010.  Cherokee Stories of the Past.  Winston-Salem, N.C.: Bandit Books.  81 pp.  Twenty-two brief interviews and profiles of lifeways.

Carlson, Leonard A., and Mark A. Roberts.  2006.  “Indian Lands, ‘Squatterism,’ and Slavery: Economic Interests and the Passage of the Indian Removal Act of 1830.”  Explorations in Economic History 43, no. 3: 486-504.

Carney, Ginny.  1996.  “Cherokee/Appalachian Communities: Remembering the Pattern, Re-Spinning the Web.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 2 (Spring): 115-121.

Carney, Virginia Moore.  2005.  Eastern Band Cherokee Women: Cultural Persistence in Their Letters and Speeches [three centuries].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  230 pp.

Carson, James Taylor.  2002.  “Dollars Never Fail to Melt Their Hearts: Native Women and the Market Revolution” [Creek, Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw].  In Neither Lady nor Slave: Working Women of the Old South, ed. S. Delfino and M. Gillespie, 15-33.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Carson, James Taylor.  2010.  “Choctaw and Chickasaw Women, 1690-1834.”  In Mississippi Women: Their Histories, Their Lives, ed., M. Swain, E. Anne Payne, and M. Spruill, 7-22.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Carter, Alice E.  1995.  “Segregation and Integration in the Appalachian Coalfields: McDowell County Responds to the ‘Brown’ Decision.”  West Virginia History 54: 78-104.

Casey McDonald, Victoria A.  2012.  Just Over the Hill: Black Appalachians in Jackson County, Western North Carolina.  Sylva, N.C.: Catch the Spirit of Appalachia.  184 pp.

Cashin, Edward J.  2009.  Guardians of the Valley: Chickasaws in Colonial South Carolina and Georgia [Savannah River Valley].  Columbia: University of South Carolina Press.  196 pp.

Cassanello, Robert, and Colin J. Davis, ed.  2009.  Migration and the Transformation of the Southern Workplace Since 1945.  Foreword by Richard Greenwald and Timothy J. Minchin.  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.  209 pp.  Seven essays on topics including the poultry industry, “Latinos and Blacks,” globalization and the coalfields of Alabama, and the mountain work ethic.

Caughey, John Walton.  [1938] 2007.  McGillivray of the Creeks [1750-1793; 214 letters to Spanish and American officials].  Reprint with new introduction by William J.  Bauer, Jr.  Southern Classics Series.  Columbia: University of South Carolina Press.  424 pp.

Cegielski, Wendy, and Brad R. Lieb.  2011.  “Hina’ Falaa, ‘The Long Path’: An Analysis of Chickasaw Settlement Using GIS in Northeast Mississippi, 1650-1840.”  Native South 4: 24-54.  Figures, maps.

Chambers, Ian.  2010.  “The Movement of Great Tellico: The Role of Town and Clan in Cherokee Spatial Understanding” [1736; Overhill region; identity by clan].  Native South 3: 89-102.

Chepesiuk, Ronald.  2005.  The Scotch-Irish: From the North of Ireland to the Making of America.  Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland.  172 pp.

Cherokee Edition.  2012.  Special issue, Foxfire Magazine 46, no. 3-4 (Fall/Winter): 1-80.  Interviews by Foxfire students: An image of leadership: interview with Chief Michell Hicks, Principal Chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, 1 | The culture of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians: interview with Davy Arch [storyteller], 14 | The seven Cherokee Clans: interview with Davy Arch, 24 | The sport of stickball: interview with JerryWolfe, 28 | Traditional weaponry: interview with William Swimmer, 32 | Legends that will never die: interview with Davy Arch [stories], 36 | “The Legend of the Milky Way,” as told by Amanda Crowe, 46 | The oral tradition, preserving tales that shaped a nation: interview with Jerry Wolfe [stories], 48 | There’s a story in your heart, the life of storytelling: interview with Lloyd Arneach, 58 | Storytelling bonfire, by Jack Blackstock, 71 | Student Reflections, 73-79.

Cherokee issue.  2009.  Special issue, Appalachian Heritage 37, no. 4 (Fall): 1-120.  Featuring articles, poetry – several translated into Cherokee, traditional stories, fiction, memoirs, and artwork by and about members of the Eastern Band of Cherokees, Qualla Boundary, western North Carolina.

Childs, Becky, and Christine Mallinson.  2006.  “The Significance of Lexical Items in the Construction of Ethnolinguistic Identity: A Case Study of Adolescent Spoken and Online Language” [group identity; Black Appalachian community of Texana, N.C.].  American Speech 81, no. 1 (Spring): 3-30.

Chirhart, Ann Short.  1998.  “‘Gardens of Education’: Beulah Rucker and African-American Culture in the Twentieth-Century Georgia Upcountry” [black educator; 1910s-1960s; Gainesville, Hall Co., Ga.].  Georgia Historical Quarterly 82 (Winter): 829-847.

Christopher D. Haveman.  2012.  “‘Last Evening I Saw the Sun Set for the Last Time’: The 1832 Treaty of Washington and the Transfer of the Creeks’ Alabama Land to White Ownership.”  Native South 5, no. 1: 61-94.

Cimprich, John.  2001.  “Slavery’s End in East Tennessee.”  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 189-198.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Previously published in East Tennessee Historical Society Publications (1980-1981): 78-89.

Ciotola, Nicholas P.  2005.  Italians of Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania [immigrants; 200-photo retrospective].  Images of America.  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  128 pp.

Ciotola, Nicholas.  2001.  “F is for Fireworks” [history of Italian immigrants’ fireworks industries in Newcastle, Pa., including famous Zambellis].  Western Pennsylvania History 84 (Fall): 10-12.

Clark, Jerry E.  [1993] 2007.  The Shawnee.  Reprint.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  105 pp.  Contents: 1. Introduction -- 2. History of the Shawnee -- 3. Social organization -- 4. Subsistence and technology -- 5. Ideology and expressive culture -- 6. Conservation, dependency, and migration -- 7. Relations with other Indians -- 8. Relations with Whites -- 9. Conclusion.

Cochran, Dana Stoker.  2008.  “Anne Spencer: From Appalachia to the Harlem Renaissance” [1882-1975].  Pluck: The Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture, no. 3: 5-9.  Raised in Bramwell, W.Va.

Coffey, David W.  2000.  “Reconstruction and Redemption in Lexington, Virginia” [Rockbridge Co., Va.; 1865-1870].  In After the Backcountry: Rural Life in the Great Valley of Virginia, 1800-1900, ed. K. Koons and W. Hofstra, 206-220. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Cohodas, Nadine.  2012.  Princess Noire: The Tumultuous Reign of Nina Simone.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  449 pp.  Originally published: New York: Pantheon Books, 2010.  Simone, the “High Priestess of Soul,” was born in Tryon, N.C. and attended high school in Asheville.

Cole, J. Timothy.  2003.  The Forest City Lynching of 1900: Populism, Racism, and White Supremacy in Rutherford County, North Carolina [documents murder and lynching of Avery Mills].  Contributions to Southern Appalachian Studies, no. 10.  Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland.  195 pp.

Cometti, Elizabeth.  2002.  “Swiss Immigration to West Virginia, 1864-1884: A Case Study” [Helvetia, Randolph Co.].  In Transnational West Virginia: Ethnic Communities and Economic Change, 1840-1940, ed. K. Fones-Wolf and R. Lewis, 50-70. West Virginia and Appalachia series, no. 1.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.  Originally published: Mississippi Valley Historical Review 47 (June 1960): 66-87.

Confer, Clarissa W.  2007.  The Cherokee Nation in the Civil War.  Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.  199 pp.

Conkin, Paul.  2005.  “Black Zack and Uncle Amon” [black farmers in post-Civil War, Greene Co., Tenn.].  Chap. 2 in The Human Tradition in the New South, ed. J. Klotter, 19-29.  Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield.

Conley, Robert J.  [1992] 2000.  The Way of the Priests [Cherokee; historical fiction].  The Real People series.  Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.  177 pp.  Originally published: New York: Doubleday.

Conley, Robert J.  2000.  Cherokee Dragon: A Novel of the Real People [historical fiction; war chief Dragging Canoe, 1737-1791].  New York: St. Martin’s Press.  288 pp.

Conley, Robert J.  2001.  “Backtracking from Oklahoma to North Carolina: An Interview with Robert J. Conley” [Cherokee novelist].  By Sandra L. Ballard.  Appalachian Journal 28 (Spring): 326-344.

Conley, Robert J.  2002.  Sequoyah [fictional biography].  New York: St. Martin’s Press.  213 pp.

Conley, Robert J.  2005.  Cherokee Medicine Man: The Life and Work of a Modern-Day Healer. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.  154 pp.

Conley, Robert J.  2005.  The Cherokee Nation: A History.  Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.  265 pp.

Conley, Robert J.  2007.  A Cherokee Encyclopedia [concise reference guide].  Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.  278 pp.

Conley, Robert J.  2009.  “Cherokee Mountains” [poem].  Appalachian Heritage 37, no. 4 (Fall): 120.  Celebrates return “home” from the Cherokee West to Cherokee N.C.

Conley, Robert J.  2009.  “Plastic Indian” [fiction].  Appalachian Heritage 37, no. 4 (Fall): 11-17.  Conley is featured author in this special Cherokee issue.

Conley, Robert J.  2009.  Cherokee Thoughts, Honest and Uncensored [28 essays].  Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.  200 pp.  Contents: Indian casinos -- Ricochet -- Stand Watie and the Treaty of 1866 -- Cherokee wannabes -- Oklahoma -- All Indians are alike, or, “Chiefing” -- Cherokee outlaws -- Grafters, sooners, and other crooks -- Why the DAR did not like me -- Cherokee women and the clan system -- Henry Starr -- Cherokee literature -- Cherokee celebrities -- Indian humor -- The Five Civilized Tribes -- Cherokee names -- Will Rogers: Cherokee writer and so much more -- Linking back -- The freedmen controversy -- John Oskison and me -- Cherokee cards -- Keetoowah -- The Dragging Canoe-Nancy Ward controversy -- California Cherokees -- Tribally specific historical fiction -- Cherokees and sports -- Parris: my Cherokee family -- Old-time Cherokee warriors: Charles Wickliffe, the Army Corps of Engineers, and the Port of Catoosa.

Conley, Robert J.  2011.  The Cherokee [history; juvenile readers].  History & Culture of Native Americans series.  New York: Chelsea House.  111 pp.

Connerly, Charles E.  2005.  “‘The Most Segregated City in America’: City Planning and Civil Rights in Birmingham, 1920-1980.  Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.  360 pp.

Connolly, Robert P., and Bradley T. Lepper, ed.  2004.  The Fort Ancient Earthworks: Prehistoric Lifeways of the Hopewell Culture in Southwestern Ohio [18 essays].  Columbus: Ohio Historical Society.  290 pp.

Conrad, Maia.  2004.  “The Art of Survival: Moravian Indians and Economic Adaptation in the Old Northwest, 1767-1808” [Ohio: Muskingum River region].  Ohio Valley History 4 (Fall): 3-18.

Conway, Cecelia.  2001.  “Appalachian Echoes of the African Banjo” [18th to 20th centuries].  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 27-39.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Previously published, Appalachian Journal 20 (1993): 146-161.

Conway, Cecelia.  2003.  “Black Banjo Songsters in Appalachia.”  Black Music Research Journal 23, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 149-166.

Cook, Samuel R.  2000.  Monacans and Miners: Native American and Coal Mining Communities in Appalachia [Va.; W.Va.].  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  329 pp.

Cook, Samuel R.  2002.  “The Monacan Indian Nation: Asserting Tribal Sovereignty in the Absence of Federal Recognition” [Va.].  Wicazo Sa Review 17 (Fall): 91-116.

Cook, Samuel R.  2009.  “The Boundaries of Participatory Research: Lessons Learned in the Monacan Indian Nation” [Va.].  In Participatory Development in Appalachia: Cultural Identity, Community, and Sustainability, ed. S. Keefe, 89-113.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Copney, Nancy Jane.  1999.  African-American Life in Preston County [W.Va.].  Images of America series.  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  128 pp.

Cordes, Kathleen Ann.  1999.  “Trail of Tears National Historic Trail.”  In America’s National Historic Trails [guidebook], by K. Cordes, 131-161.  Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.

Craig, John M.  2005.  “‘There Is Hell Going On Up There’: The Carnegie Klan Riot of 1923” [southwestern Pa.].  Pennsylvania History 72, no. 3 (Summer): 322-346.

Cravey, Altha J., and Gabriela Valdivia.  2011.  “Carolina del Norte: An Introduction” [Latino immigration’s transformation of the South].  Southeastern Geographer 51, no. 2 (Summer): 213-226.  Introduction to a special issue (pp. 213-363) that includes notes, papers, plenary discussions.

Crews, C. Daniel, and Richard W. Starbuck, ed.  2010-2013.  Records of the Moravians among the Cherokees.  Tahlequah, Okla.: Cherokee National Press.  Contents: v. 1. Early contact and the establishment of the first mission, 1752-1802 -- v. 2. Beginnings of the mission and establishment of the schools, 1802-1805 -- v. 3. The Anna Rosina years, part 1: success in school and mission, 1805-1810 -- v. 4. The Anna Rosina years, part 2: warfare on the horizon, 1810-1816.

Culpepper, Linda Parramore.  2002.  “Black Charlestonians in the Mountains: African American Community Building in Post-Civil-War Flat Rock, North Carolina” [Henderson Co.].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 8 (Fall): 362-381.

Cumfer, Cynthia.  2003.  “Local Origins of National Indian Policy: Cherokee and Tennessean Ideas About Sovereignty and Nationhood, 1790-1811.”  Journal of the Early Republic 23 (Spring): 21-46.

Cumfer, Cynthia.  2007.  Separate Peoples, One Land: The Minds of Cherokees, Blacks, and Whites on the Tennessee Frontier.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  324 pp.

Cumfer, Cynthia.  2009.  “Nan-ye-hi (Nancy Ward) (c.1730s-1824): Diplomatic Mother” [Cherokee].  In Tennessee Women: Their Lives and Times, ed. S. Freeman and B. Bond, 1-22 .  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Curriden, Mark, and Leroy Phillips, Jr.  1999.  Contempt of Court: The Turn-of-the-Century Lynching That Launched a Hundred Years of Federalism [1906, Chattanooga, Tenn.].  New York: Faber and Faber.  394 pp.

Curtin, Mary Ellen.  2000.  Black Prisoners and Their World: Alabama, 1865-1900 [incl. convict coal miners].  Carter G. Woodson Series in Black Studies.  Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia.  261 pp.

Cushman, Ellen.  2011.  The Cherokee Syllabary: Writing the People’s Perseverance.  Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.  238 pp.  Contents: Introduction: Peoplehood, tools, and perseverance | Sequoyah and the politics of language | The syllabary as writing system | The syllabary’s design | The syllabary from script to print | Elias Boudinot and the Cherokee Phoenix | The breadth of the Cherokee writing system, 1840-1920 | Perseverance and calculated inconspicuousness, 1920-1980 | Peoplehood and perseverance: the Cherokee language, 1980-2010.

Dale, Jack G., Susan Andreatta, and Elizabeth Freeman.  2001.  “Language and the Migrant Worker Experience in Rural North Carolina Communities.”  In Latino Workers in the Contemporary South, ed. A. D. Murphy, C. Blanchard, and J. A. Hill, 91-104.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 34.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Davenport, Doris.  2003. “A Candle for Queen Ida” [Ida Prather Cox (1896-1967) from Toccoa, Ga.; “Uncrowned Queen of the Blues”].  Black Music Research Journal 23, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 91-102.

Davies, D. Eirug.  2012.  The Welsh of Tennessee.  Tal-y-bont: Y Lolfa [Chester Springs, Pa.: U.S. distributor, Dufour Editions].  156 pp.  “After Samuel Roberts’ ill-fated attempt at forming a Welsh colony in Tennessee, others from Wales would help develop the state’s fledgling iron and coal industry. This book tells how they became Knoxville’s largest employer, started the Dixie Eisteddfod, and got involved in an armed insurrection over the use of convicts in the mines.”

Davis, Donald Edward, ed.  2009.  Voices from the Nueva Frontera: Latino Immigration in Dalton, Georgia.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  189 pp.  Contents: The new face of carpet / Thomas M. Deaton -- The economic impact / Aref A. Hervani -- The culture of the capital de las alfombras / Roschelle Bautista -- The religious response / Father Daniel Stack -- The public school response / Ken W. Ellinger -- The Georgia project / Jo-Anne Schick -- The state college / Monte Salyer -- The social problems / Donald E. Davis -- The social work agenda / David P. Boyle -- Conclusion: lessons of the nueva frontera.

Davis, Ethan.  2008-2010.  “An Administrative Trail of Tears: Indian Removal” [1830s; Choctaw tribe; primary sources].  American Journal of Legal History 50 (January): 49-100.

Davis, R. P. Stephen, Jr.  2002.  “The Cultural Landscape of the North Carolina Piedmont at Contact.”  In The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, 1540-1760, ed. R. Ethridge and C. Hudson, 135-154.  Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.

Day, James S.  2006.  “The Convict-Lease System in Alabama, 1872-1927.”  Gulf South Historical Review 21, no. 2: 6-29.

De Vorsey, Louis, Jr.  [1971] 2005.  “Early Maps As a Source in the Reconstruction of Southern Indian Landscapes.”  In Culture, Ethnicity, and Justice in the South: The Southern Anthropological Society, 1968-1971, 466-484.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  (Reprint, from Proceedings No. 5.  Red, White, and Black: Symposium on Indians in the Old South, ed. C.  Hudson, 12-30).

Dean, Robert L., and Douglas J. Perrelli.  2006.  “Highway Archaeology in Western New York: Archaeologists’ Views of Cooperation between State and Tribal Review Agencies” [Seneca Nation; repatriation of artifacts; Allegany and Cattaraugus Reservations].  Chap. 9 in Cross-Cultural Collaboration: Native Peoples and Archaeology in the Northeastern United States, ed. J. Kerber, 131-149.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

DeAngelis, Therese.  2003.  The Cherokee: Native Basket Weavers [juvenile literature].  America’s First Peoples.  Mankato, Minn.: Blue Earth Books.  32 pp.

Deaths at the West Virginia Colored Tuberculosis Sanitarium at Denmar [lists over 1000 deaths and burials, 1919-1946, by name with place and date of birth, date of death, occupation].  1997.  West Virginia History 56: 88-121.

Denkler, Ann.  2007.  Sustaining Identity, Recapturing Heritage: Exploring Issues of Public History, Tourism, and Race in a Southern Town [Luray, Va.; African American cultural identity].  Lanham, Md.: Lexington Books.  131 pp.

Dennis, Matthew.  2010.  Seneca Possessed: Indians, Witchcraft, and Power in the Early American Republic [western N.Y.].  Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.  313 pp.

Dennis, Yvonne Wakim. 2004.  Sequoyah, 1770?-1843 [elementary level].  American Indian Biographies.  Mankato, Minn.: Blue Earth Books.  32 pp.

Denson, Andrew.  2004.  Demanding the Cherokee Nation: Indian Autonomy and American Culture, 1830-1900.  Indians of the Southeast.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  327 pp.

Denson, Andrew.  2009.  “Gatlinburg’s Cherokee Monument: Public Memory in the Shadow of a National Park” [Tenn.].  Appalachian Journal 37, no. 1-2 (Fall 2009-Winter 2010): 28-43. Dedicated in 1939, the bronze tablet reads, “To Tsali the Cherokee and his two sons who gave their lives in 1836 so that their people might remain in the land of the Great Smokies.”

Dew, Charles B.  1994.  Bond of Iron: Master and Slave at Buffalo Forge.  New York: Norton.  429 pp.

Dew, Charles B.  2001.  “Sam Williams, Forgeman: The Life of an Industrial Slave at Buffalo Forge, Virginia.”  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 74-100.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Previously published in Race, Region, and Reconstruction.  New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 1982.

DiBaccio, Lori Marie.  2006.  “The Ricottillis of Barbour County: An Italian Family Carries On” [from 1921; Talbott, W.Va.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 32, no. 3 (Fall): 48-53.  Sidebar, “Bagpipes in West Virginia” [traditional to Italy, played by the Ricottillis], by Gerald Milnes, 54-55.

Dockery, Bill.  1999.  “Born to Build: The Architectural Career of De Witt Dykes, Sr.” [Knoxville, Tenn.; black church architect; d. 1991].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 16 (Spring): 9-13

Donahue, Arwen.  2009.  This Is Home Now: Kentucky’s Holocaust Survivors Speak [oral histories from Prestonsburg, Lexington, Louisville].  Photographs by Rebecca Gayle Howell.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  215 pp.

Donald, Christopher Ross.  2006.  “Growth and Independence of Methodist Congregations in Blacksburg, Virginia” [19th-century split over slavery and class issues; AME Church, 1867].  Smithfield Review: Studies in the History of the Region West of the Blue Ridge 10: 49-75.

Dorris, Michael.  1997.  The Window [juvenile fiction; racially mixed families].  New York: Hyperion Books for Children.  106 pp.  “When ten-year-old Rayona’s Native American mother enters a treatment facility, her estranged father, a Black man, finally introduces her to his side of the family, who are not at all what she expected.”

Dorsey, Mignette Y. Patrick.  2010.  Speak Truth to Power: The Story of Charles Patrick, a Civil Rights Pioneer [Birmingham, Ala.].  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  130 pp.

Dougherty, Bill.  2001.  “‘Nothing But Just Fighting’: The 1936 CCC Race Riot” [Pocahontas Co. CCC camp].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 27 (Winter): 30-33.

Douglas, John.  2004.  “John Henry: ‘Take this hammer, it won't kill you’” [1968 visit to Summers Co., W.Va.; tracks the legend].  Southern Cultures 10, no. 2 (Summer): 73-86.

Dowdy, Michael.  2012.  “‘Andando Entre Dos Mundos’: Towards an Appalachian Latino Literature.”  Appalachian Journal 39, no. 3-4 (Spring/Summer): 270-293.

Drake, Richard B.  2001.  “Slavery and Antislavery in Appalachia.”  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 16-26.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Previously published, Appalachian Heritage 14 (1986): 25-33.

Dredge, Bart.  2012.  “Defending White Supremacy: David Clark and the Southern Textile Bulletin, 1911 to 1955.”  North Carolina Historical Review 89, no. 1 (January): 59-91.

Drennen, William M., Jr., and Kojo (William T.) Jones, Jr.  2004.  Red, White, Black and Blue: A Dual Memoir of Race and Class in Appalachia [1950s-60s Charleston, W.Va.].  Edited by Dolores M. Johnson.  Series in Ethnicity and Gender in Appalachia.  Athens: Ohio University Press.  248 pp.

Drooker, Penelope B.  2002.  “The Ohio Valley, 1550-1750: Patterns of Sociopolitical Coalescence and Dispersal.”  In The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, 1540-1760, ed. R. Ethridge and C. Hudson, 115-133.  Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.

Dubofsky, Melvyn.  2002.  “The Lattimer Massacre and the Meaning of Citizenship” [1897; immigrant anthracite miners].  Pennsylvania History 69 (Winter): 52-57.

Duffy, Sean, and Jim Thornton.  2008.  The Wheeling Family: A Celebration of Immigrants and Their Neighborhoods.  Wheeling, W.Va.: Creative Impressions.  173 pp.  Photos and family stories, 1850-1950, from Wales, Ireland, Germany, Italy, Greece, Poland, Lebanon, and Ukraine.

Duffy, Seán , and Jim Thornton.  2008.  The Wheeling Family: A Celebration of Immigrants and Their Neighborhoods.  Wheeling, W.Va: Creative Impressions.  173 pp.  Contents: Preface -- Essay: Corned beef, cabagoo & Coleman’s fish by Seán Duffy -- Introduction -- Early arrivals: Wheeling’s Welsh, German & Gaelic Irish immigrants -- L’Shem Shomayim: Wheeling’s Jewish immigrants -- Little Corfino & Little Italy: the Italians of Warwood, East Wheeling & Elm Grove -- The Lebanese and Greeks of Center Wheeling -- The Poles and Ukrainians of South Wheeling and Fulton -- Appendix A: Old Benwood businesses and families -- Appendix B: Wheeling’s cultural heritage festivals -- Bibliography.

Duffy, Seán.  2012.  The Wheeling Family, Volume 2: More Immigrants, Migrants and Neighborhoods.  Wheeling, W.Va: J. Thornton, Wheling History.  316 pp.  Expanded from vol. one (2008) to include stories from African American families, and other Upper Ohio Valley nationalities.

Duggan, Betty J.  1997.  “Tourism, Cultural Authenticity, and the Native Crafts Cooperative: The Eastern Cherokee Experience.”  In Tourism and Culture: An Applied Perspective, ed. E. Chambers, 31-57.  SUNY Series in Advances in Applied Anthropology.  Albany: State University of New York Press.

Duggan, Betty J.  2002.  “Voices from the Periphery: Reconstructing and Interpreting Post-Removal Histories of the Duck Town Cherokees” [Polk Co., Tenn. enclave].  In Southern Indians and Anthropologists: Culture, Politics, and Identity, ed. L. Lefler and F. Gleach, 43-68.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 35.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Dunaway, Wilma A.  1999.  “Diaspora, Death, and Sexual Exploitation: Slave Families at Risk in the Mountain South.” Appalachian Journal 26 (Winter): 128-149.

Dunaway, Wilma A.  2001.  “Put in Master’s Pocket: Cotton Expansion and Interstate Slave Trading in the Mountain South.”  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 116-132.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Dunaway, Wilma A.  2003.  Slavery in the American Mountain South.  Studies in Modern Capitalism.  Cambridge, England; New York: Cambridge University Press.  352 pp.  Weatherford Award winner for nonfiction.

Dunaway, Wilma A.  2003.  The African-American Family in Slavery and Emancipation [Southern Appalachia focus].  Studies in Modern Capitalism.  Cambridge, England; New York: Cambridge University Press.  368 pp.

Dunaway, Wilma.  2004.  “Letter to the Editor” [in response to reviews of the author’s two books, by Charles L. Purdue and John Alexander Williams, in the winter issue of Appalachian Journal (31: 224-234): Slavery in the American Mountain South and The African-American Family in Slavery and Emancipation, both published by Cambridge University Press, 2003].  Appalachian Journal 31 (Spring/Summer): 272-278.

Duncan, Barbara R.  2008.  Crossing Cowee Mountain [poems; Cherokee].  Cullowhee, N.C.: New Native Press.  32 pp.

Duncan, Barbara R., and Brett H. Riggs.  2003.  Cherokee Heritage Trails Guidebook [Eastern Cherokee history, culture, photographs].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  368 pp.

Duncan, Barbara R., and James “Bo” Taylor.  2000.  “Hanging in the Balance: The Fate of the Cherokee Language in the 21st Century” [N.C.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 17 (Summer): 35-40.

Duncan, Barbara R., ed.  1998.  Living Stories of the Cherokee [N.C.; 72 tales by six tellers].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  253 pp.

Duncan, Barbara R., ed.  2008.  The Origin of the Milky Way & Other Living Stories of the Cherokee.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  133 pp.  Presented by Davy Arch and other members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, in their own words.

Duncan, Barbara.  2002.  “Freeman Owle: Storyteller and Stonecarver, Qualla Boundary” [2001 Brown-Hudson Award winner].  North Carolina Folklore Journal 49 (Spring/Summer): 37-39.

Duran, Eduardo, Patricia Grant Long, Barbara Ellen Smith, and Talmage Stanley.  2005.  “From Historical Trauma to Hope and Healing,” by Eduardo Duran, 164 [Plenary session, 2004 Appalachian Studies Association, Cherokee, N.C.].  With responses: “Diabetes Support Advocate,” by Patricia Grant Long, 172; “The Struggle of Memory against Forgetting,” by Barbara Ellen Smith, 176; “Finding Historical Trauma in the Ordinary,” by Tal Stanley, 179.  Appalachian Journal 32, no. 2 (Winter): 164-180.

Durham, Walter T.  2006.  “Ulster Immigrants and the Settlement of Tennessee” [1770s; map].  Journal of East Tennessee History 77, supp.: 30-44.

Durham, Walter T.  2007.  “Noh-Noh-He-Tsu-Nageh and the Cherokee Removal” [pseud. of white journalist critical of government action; 1838].  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 66, no. 3 (Fall): 236-249.

Durman, Chris.  2008.  “African American Old-Time String Band Music: A Selective Discography.”  Notes 64, no. 4 (June): 797-808.

DuVal, Kathleen.  2006.  “Debating Identity, Sovereignty, and Civilization: The Arkansas Valley after the Louisiana Purchase” [Native American, incl. Cherokee, vs. Anglo-American settlement].  Journal of the Early Republic 26, no. 1 (Spring): 25-58.

Duvall, Deborah L.  2008.  Rabbit and the Well.  Paintings by Murv Jacob.  Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.  32 pp.  Cherokee folklore; children’s story.

Eagle, Bob. 2004.  “Directory of African-Appalachian Musicians” [identifies where musicians were born, lived, performed, taught, and died. Alphabetical by: state: county: city].  Black Music Research Journal 24, no. 1 (Spring): 7-71.

Eagle, Bob.  2004.  “Predicting Black Musical Innovation and Integration: The 1850 Mance Index for Appalachia.” [based on 1850 Census, ranks counties].  Black Music Research Journal 24, no. 1 (Spring): 73-90.

Elder, Pat Spurlock.  1999.  The Melungeons: Examining an Appalachian Legend [history; surnames].  Blountville, Tenn.: Continuity Press.  394 pp.

Eldridge, Carrie.  1999.  Cabell County’s Empire for Freedom: The Manumission of Sampson Sanders’s Slaves [1849 Va. (W.Va.); “A continuous history of an African-American family from 1780 to the present”].  Huntington, W.Va.: John Deaver Drinko Academy for American Political Institution and Civic Culture, Marshall University.  164 pp.

Ellison, John T.  1999.  “‘Like So Many Wolves’: Creek Removal in the Cherokee Country, 1835-1838.”  Journal of East Tennessee History 71: 1-24.

Ellisor, John T.  2010.  The Second Creek War: Interethnic Conflict and Collusion on a Collapsing Frontier [1836; Ala.].  Indians of the Southeast series.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  497 pp.

Engelhardt, Elizabeth.  2008.  “Effie Waller Smith: African-American Appalachian Poetry from the Breaks” [1879-1960].  Appalachian Heritage 36, no. 3 (Summer): 80-83.  Pikeville, Ky.; special issue–“African-American Appalachia.”

Engstrom, James D.  2001.  “Industry and Immigration in Dalton, Georgia” [carpet manufacturing “capital”].  In Latino Workers in the Contemporary South, ed. A. D. Murphy, C. Blanchard, and J. A. Hill, 44-56.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 34.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Eslinger, Ellen.  1994.  “The Shape of Slavery on the Kentucky  Frontier, 1775-1800.”  Register of the Kentucky Historical  Society 92 (Winter): 1-23.

Eslinger, Ellen.  1999.  “The Beginnings of Afro-American Christianity Among Kentucky Baptists” [Bluegrass region].  In The Buzzel About Kentuck: Settling the Promised Land, ed. C. Friend, 196-215.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Eslinger, Ellen.  2000.  “‘Sable Spectres on Missions of Evil’: Free Blacks of Antebellum Rockbridge County, Virginia” [tables].  In After the Backcountry: Rural Life in the Great Valley of Virginia, 1800-1900, ed. K. Koons and W. Hofstra, 194-205. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Eslinger, Ellen.  2005.  “The Evolution of Racial Politics in Early Ohio” [early 1800s; Black Laws; slavery prohibition].  Chap. 4 in The Center of a Great Empire: The Ohio Country in the Early American Republic, ed. A. Cayton and S. Hobbs, 81-104.  Athens: Ohio University Press.

Eslinger, Ellen.  2006.  “Freedom Without Independence: The Story of a Former Slave and Her Family” [1851 manumission, Warren Co., Va., and transition to Washington Co., Pa.].  Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 114, no. 2 (March): 262-291.

Ethridge, Robbie, and Charles Hudson, ed.  2002.  The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, 1540-1760 [12 essays].  Chancellor Porter L. Fortune Symposium in Southern History Series.  Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.  369 pp.

Ethridge, Robbie, and Charles Hudson.  1998.  “The Early Historic Transformation of the Southeastern Indians” [16th century collapse of chiefdoms].  In Cultural Diversity in the U.S. South: Anthropological Contributions to a Region in Transition, ed. C. Hill and P. Beaver, 34-50.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 31.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Ethridge, Robbie Franklyn, and Sheri Marie Shuck-Hall, ed.  2009.  Mapping the Mississippian Shatter Zone: The Colonial Indian Slave Trade and Regional Instability in the American South. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  526 pp.  Fifteen essays: Introduction: mapping the Mississippian shatter zone / Robbie Ethridge -- Events as seen from the north: the Iroquois and colonial slavery / William A. Fox -- From refugees to slave traders: the transformation of the Westo Indians / Maureen Meyers -- “Caryinge awaye their corne and children”: the effects of Westo slave raids on the Indians of the lower south / Eric E. Bowne -- Catawba coalescence and the shattering of the Carolina piedmont, 1540-1675 / Robin A. Beck, Jr -- “Indians refusing to carry burdens”: understanding the success of Catawba political, military, and settlement strategies in colonial Carolina / Mary Elizabeth Fitts, Charles L. Heath -- “The greatest travelers in America”: Shawnee survival in the shatter zone / Stephen Warren, Randolph Noe -- Tracing the origins of the early Creeks, 1050-1700 CE / Ned J. Jenkins -- Alabama and Coushatta diaspora and coalescence in the Mississippian shatter zone / Sheri M. Shuck-Hall -- Violence in a shattered world / Matthew H. Jennings -- Razing Florida: the Indian slave trade and the devastation of Spanish Florida, 1659-1715 / John E. Worth -- Shattered and infected: epidemics and the origins of the Yamasee war, 1696-1715 / Paul Kelton -- Choctaws at the border of the shatter zone: spheres of exchange and spheres of social value / Patricia Galloway -- Shatter zone shock waves along the lower Mississippi / Marvin D. Jeter -- Picking up the pieces: Natchez coalescence in the shatter zone / George Edward Milne -- Afterword: some thoughts on further work / Robbie Ethridge.

Ethridge, Robbie Franklyn.  2003.  Creek Country: The Creek Indians and Their World [Ga., Ala., Miss., Tenn.].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  369 pp.

Ethridge, Robbie Franklyn.  2010.  From Chicaza to Chickasaw: The European Invasion and the Transformation of the Mississippian World, 1540-1715.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  344 pp.  From first contact in 1540 by Hernando De Soto to the beginning of the Yamasee War; northern Mississippi.

Ethridge, Robbie.  2005.  “Creeks and Americans in the Age of Washington” [Ga., Ala.].  Chap. 11 in George Washington’s South, ed. T. Harvey and G. O’Brien, 278-312.  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.

Everett, C. S.  1999.  “Melungeon History and Myth.”  Appalachian Journal 26 (Summer): 358-409.

Ewen, Lynda Ann.  2007.  “A Brief History of the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Gender in Appalachia (CSEGA).”  Pluck: The Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture, no. 2: 3-4.

Fain, Cicero M.  2007.  “Black Response to the Construction of Colored Huntington, West Virginia, during the Jim Crow Era” [1880-1929].  West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, new series, vol. 1, no. 2 (Fall): 1-24.

Fain, Cicero M.  2011.  “The African American Experience in Antebellum Cabell County, Virginia/West Virginia, 1810-1865.”  Ohio Valley History 11, no. 3 (Fall): 3-23.  Maps, tables.

Fain, Cicero.  2011.  “Early Black Migration and the Post-emancipation Black Community in Cabell County, West Virginia, 1865-1871.”  West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, new series, vol. 5, no. 2 (Fall): 29-58.  Maps, tables, images.

Fain, Cicero.  2011.  “Into the Crucible: The Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad and the Black Industrial Worker in Southern West Virginia, 1870-1900.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 17, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 42-65.  Black migrants; Huntington, W.Va.; map, tables.

Fariello, M. Anna.  2009.  Cherokee Basketry: From the Hands of Our Elders.  Charleston, S.C.: History Press.  160 pp.  Qualla Boundary; forms and function, materials and weaving patterns, resources, profiles of traditional weavers, photographs, bibliography.  See also: Western Carolina University’s Digital Collections: “Cherokee Traditions,” and “Craft Revival,”  http://www.wcu.edu/hunter-library/collections/digital-collections.asp.

Fariello, M. Anna.  2010.  “Cherokee Rivercane Baskets” [history; process; weavers].  North Carolina Folklore Journal 57, no. 2 (Fall-Winter): 41-55.

Fariello, M. Anna.  2011.  Cherokee Pottery: From the Hands of Our Elders [N.C.].  Charleston, S.C.: History Press.  166 pp.  Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; history and traditions passed down; designs and tools; the “last” Cherokee potter [1908]; bibliography.

Feely, Michael.  2012.  “The Changing Face of Chattanooga” [Tenn.; Latino immigrants].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 28, no. 1 (Summer): 11-13.

Feldman, Ellen.  2008.  Scottsboro: A Novel.  New York: W. W. Norton.  363 pp.  Historical fiction; 1931 Scottsboro Boys’ rape trial, Jackson County, Ala.

Feldman, Lynne B.  1999.  A Sense of Place: Birmingham’s Black Middle-Class Community, 1890-1930.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  328 pp.

Ferguson, Leland G.  2011.  God’s Fields: Landscape, Religion, and Race in Moravian Wachovia [Forsyth Co., N.C.].  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.  276 pp.

Ferris, Jean.  2007.  Underground [juvenile fiction; fugitive slaves].  New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.  167 pp.  “In 1839, Charlotte Brown is sold north to Kentucky, where she becomes a maid at Mammoth Cave Hotel, falls in love with one of the tour guides there, and gets involved in the Underground Railroad.”

Fields, Elizabeth Arnett.  1998.  “Between Two Cultures: Judge John Martin and the Struggle for Cherokee Sovereignty” [1819-1838].  In The Southern Colonial Backcountry: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Frontier Communities, ed. D. Crass, et al., 182-199.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Finger, John R.  1995.  “Cherokee Accommodation and Persistence in the Southern Appalachians.” In Appalachia in the Making: The Mountain South in the Nineteenth Century, ed. M. Pudup, D. Billings, and A. Waller, 25-49.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Finger, John R.  1998.  “Tennessee Indian History: Creativity and Power.”  In Tennessee History: The Land, The People, and the Culture, ed. C. Van West, 1-28.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Finger, John R.  2006.  “Cherokees, Eastern Band.”  In The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, Vol. 6: Ethnicity, ed. C. Ray, 114-116.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Fink, Leon.  2003.  The Maya of Morganton: Work and Community in the Nuevo New South [N.C. poultry plants; Guatemalan workers; labor disputes].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  254 pp.

Finley, Cheryl, Teenie Harris, Laurence Admiral Glasco, and Joe William Trotter.  2011.  Teenie Harris, Photographer: Image, Memory, History [100 plates; 1930s-1970s].  Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.  192 pp.  “Charles ‘Teenie’ Harris (1908-1998) photographed the events and daily life of African Americans for the Pittsburgh Courier, one of the nation’s most influential Black newspapers.”

Fitts, Mary Elizabeth.  2006.  “Mapping Catawba Coalescence” [York Co., S.C.; Mecklenburg Co., N.C.].  North Carolina Archaeology 55: 1-59.

Fitzgerald, David.  2002. Cherokee [pictorial].  Photography by David Fitzgerald; text by Robert J. Conley.  Portland, Oreg.: Graphic Arts Center Publishing.  127 pp.

Fitzpatrick, Pat.  2001.  “Growing Up In Stumptown” [black neighborhood; Asheville; 1880s-1970].  In May We All Remember Well: A Journal of the History & Cultures of Western North Carolina, Vol. 2, ed. R. S. Brunk, 141-153.  Asheville, N.C.: Robert S. Brunk Auction Services, Inc.

Fleming, John.  2005.  A Summer Remembered: A Memoir.  Yellow Springs, Ohio: Silver Maple Publications.  193 pp.  African American coming-of-age in 1950s Morganton, Burke County, Western N.C.

Fletcher, Winona L., ed.  2003.  Community Memories: A Glimpse of African American Life in Frankfort, Kentucky.  Frankfort: Kentucky Historical Society.  166 pp.  Thirty-six interviews; two hundred photographs.

Fogelson, Raymond D., and William C. Sturtevant, ed.  2004.  Handbook of North American Indians. Volume 14. Southeast [encyclopedic]. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution. 1042 pp.

Fones-Wolf, Colin T.  2004.  “A Union Voice for Racial Equality: Miles Stanley and Civil Rights in West Virginia, 1957-68.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 10 (Spring/Fall): 111-128.

Fones-Wolf, Ken, and Ronald L. Lewis, ed.  2002.  Transnational West Virginia: Ethnic Communities and Economic Change, 1840-1940 [12 essays].  West Virginia and Appalachia series, no. 1.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.  325 pp.

Fones-Wolf, Ken.  2002.  “Caught between Revolutions: Wheeling Germans in the Civil War Era” [(W.)Va.; 1830s, 1850s immigrants; antislavery politics].  In Transnational West Virginia: Ethnic Communities and Economic Change, 1840-1940, ed. K. Fones-Wolf and R. Lewis, 18-47.  West Virginia and Appalachia series, no. 1.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.

Fones-Wolf, Ken.  2002.  “Craft, Ethnicity, and Identity: Belgian Glassworkers in West Virginia, 1898-1940” [Clarksburg and Salem].  In Transnational West Virginia: Ethnic Communities and Economic Change, 1840-1940, ed. K. Fones-Wolf and R. Lewis, 112-134.  West Virginia and Appalachia series, no. 1.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.

Ford, Lacy K.  2009.  Deliver Us from Evil: The Slavery Question in the Old South.  New York: Oxford University Press.  673 pp.  Contents: PART ONE. The Upper South’s travail -- Owning slaves, disowning slavery -- Rebellion and reaction -- PART SIX. The Upper South responds -- The Upper South debates slavery and colonization -- Tennessee debates slavery -- Ending free Black suffrage in North Carolina.

Ford, Lisa.  2010.  Settler Sovereignty: Jurisdiction and Indigenous People in America and Australia, 1788-1836 [Ga.].  Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.  313 pp.

Forret, Jeff.  2008.  “Conflict and the ‘Slave Community’: Violence among Slaves in Upcountry South Carolina.”  Journal of Southern History 74, no. 3 (August): 551-588.

Foster, Sharon Ewell.  2006.  Abraham’s Well: A Novel [historical fiction; black Cherokees; 1838 Trail of Tears].  Minneapolis, Minn.: Bethany House.  335 pp.

Fowler, Virginia C.  2008.  “Nikki Giovanni’s Appalachian Ties.”  Appalachian Heritage 36, no. 3 (Summer): 42-50.  Special issue–“African-American Appalachia.

Fowler, Virginia C.  2012.  “A Nikki Giovanni Chronology” [from 1914].  Appalachian Heritage 40, no. 4 (Fall): 51-62.

Fox, Minnie C., comp.  [1904] 2005.  The Blue Grass Cook Book.  Introduction by John Fox Jr.; new introduction by Toni Tipton-Martin.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  350 pp.  Originally published: New York: Fox, Duffield & Co.  “...three hundred recipes from...near Minnie Fox’s Bourbon County, Kentucky, family estate and her Big Stone Gap, Virginia, home....She reveals the vital role of the black cooks.”

Frank, Andrew K.  2005.  Creeks and Southerners: Biculturalism on the Early American Frontier [intermarriage; Ga., Ala., Fla.].  Indians of the Southeast.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  192 pp.

Frantz, John B.  2001.  “The Religious Development of the Early German Settlers in ‘Greater Pennsylvania’: The Shenandoah Valley of Virginia.”  Pennsylvania History 68 (Winter): 66-100.

Frederick, Francis.  2010.  Slave Life in Virginia and Kentucky: A Narrative by Francis Fedric, Escaped Slave [ca. 1805-1882; Mason Co., Ky.].  Edited by Catherine Lynette Innes.  Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press.  124 pp.

Freed, Mark.  2004.  “Preliminary Bibliography of Best-Known Black Appalachian Musicians” [based on 1921 map of region].  Black Music Research Journal 24, no. 1 (Spring): 91-169.

French, Laurence Armand.  1998.  The Qualla Cherokee Surviving in Two Worlds [N.C.; negatively reviewed].  Native American Studies, no. 5.  Lewiston, N.Y.: E. Mellen Press.  245 pp.

Fry, Michael.  2005.  How the Scots Made America.  New York: Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press.  242 pp.

Furbee, Mary R.  2001. Wild Rose: Nancy Ward and the Cherokee Nation [1737-1822; juvenile literature]. Greensboro, N.C.: Morgan Reynolds.  112 pp.

Furbee, Mary Rodd.  1997.  “‘I Was Never Afraid of Anything’: Pilot Rose Rolls Cousins” [growing up black in Fairmont, W.Va. and beating the odds to become a licensed pilot].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 23 (Summer): 36-41.

Gabbin, Joanne Veal.  2012.  “Nikki Giovanni: A Collector of Memories.”  Appalachian Heritage 40, no. 4 (Fall): 27-31.

Gallay, Alan, ed.  2009.  Indian Slavery in Colonial America. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  440 pp.  Twelve essays, including these five: Introduction: Indian slavery in historical context / Alan Gallay -- “They shalbe slaves for their lives”: Indian slavery in colonial Virginia / C.S. Everett -- South Carolina’s entrance into the Indian slave trade / Alan Gallay --  Indian slavery in southeastern Indian and British societies, 1670-1730 / Denise I. Bossy -- The making of a militaristic slaving society: the Chickasaws and the colonial Indian slave trade / Robbie Ethridge.

Galloway, Patricia Kay.  2006.  Practicing Ethnohistory: Mining Archives, Hearing Testimony, Constructing Narrative [Choctaw confederacy in the 18th-century; collection of the author’s writing, 1981-2003].  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  454 pp.

Gambold, Anna Rosina, and John Gambold.  2007.  The Moravian Springplace Mission to the Cherokees.  2 volumes [v. 1. 1805-1813 -- v. 2. 1814-1821].  Edited with an introduction by Rowena McClinton.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  Annotated translation of the diaries of the Gambolds, Moravian missionaries to the Cherokee Indians; northwest Georgia.

Gann, Rosalind Raymond, Brenda Pennington Dean, and Joaquin Marquez.  2005.  “Beyond English Hegemony: Language, Migration and Appalachian Schools” [Morristown, Hamblen Co., Tenn.; Mexican school children; ‘English only’ law].  Changing English: Studies in Culture & Education 12 (December): 431-441.

Gardner, S. L.  2004.  “Black Days, Black Dust: An Oral History of Life in the Coalfields” [discusses collaboration with Robert Armstead to write his memoir, Black Days, Black Dust: The Memories of an African American Coal Miner (University of Tennessee Press, 2002)].  Traditions: A Journal of West Virginia Folk Culture and Educational Awareness 9: 41-44.

Gardner, Sharon L.  2000.  “Memories of a Mining Family: Tony Armstead Recalls Four Generations” [northern W.Va. coalfields; African-American miners].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 26 (Winter): 52-57.

Garrison, Memphis Tennessee.  2001.  Memphis Tennessee Garrison: The Remarkable Story of a Black Appalachian Woman [1890-1988; school teacher and union organizer; McDowell Co., W.Va.].  Edited by Ancella R. Bickley and Lynda Ann Ewen; historical afterword by Joe W. Trotter.  Ohio University Press Series in Ethnicity and Gender in Appalachia.  Athens: Ohio University Press.  272 pp.

Garrison, Tim Alan.  2002.  The Legal Ideology of Removal: The Southern Judiciary and the Sovereignty of Native American Nations [1830s, states’ rights leverage].  Studies in the Legal History of the South.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  331 pp.

Gates, Henry Louis, Jr.  2008.  “Berea College Commencement Address” [Class of 2007].  Appalachian Heritage 36, no. 3 (Summer): 21-28.  Special issue–“African-American Appalachia.

Gates, Henry Louis.  1994.  Colored People: A Memoir [1949-1969].  New York: Knopf.  216 pp.  Weatherford Award winner.  The author was born and grew up in Piedmont, W.Va., and currently directs African American Studies at Harvard.

Gates, Henry Louis.  2012.  The Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Reader.  Edited by Abby Wolf.  New York: Basic Civitas Books.  644 pp.  “...collects three decades of his writings in a range of fields, in a volume that also offers insight into his achievements as a historian, theorist, and cultural critic.”  Born and raised in Piedmont, W.Va., Gates serves as Director of Harvard’s Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research.

Gill, Hannah E.  2010.  The Latino Migration Experience in North Carolina: New Roots in the Old North State.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  208 pp.

Gille, Frank H., ed.  1999.  Indians of West Virginia [dictionary; by tribe].  St. Clair Shores, Mich.: Somerset Publishers.  324 pp.

Gilmore, Peter.  2000.  “‘A Fiddler Was a Great Acquisition to Any Neighborhood’: Traditional Music and Ulster Culture of the Pennsylvania Frontier” [Scotch-Irish]. Western Pennsylvania History 83 (Fall): 148-165.

Gimpel, James G., and J. Celeste Lay.  2008.  “Political Socialization and Reactions to Immigration-Related Diversity in Rural America” [tables].  Rural Sociology 73, no. 2 (June): 180-204.  Garrett Co., western Md., was one of nine settings surveyed in Md. and Iowa.

Giovanni, Nikki.  2012.  “Affirming My Birth Date Though I Have No Intention of Running For Any Public Office” [June 7, 1943].  Appalachian Heritage 40, no. 4 (Fall): 49-50.

Glancey, Diane.  2009.  Pushing the Bear: After the Trail of Tears [fiction].  American Indian Literature and Critical Studies Series.  Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.  197 pp.  Sequel to the author’s 1996 novel, Pushing the Bear: A Novel of the Trail of Tears (Harcourt Brace).  Starving Cherokees arrive at Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, 1839.

Glancy, Diane.  1996.  Pushing the Bear: A Novel of The Trail of Tears.  Orlando, Fla.: Harcourt Brace.

Golden, Tim.  2002.  “Mexican Drug Dealers Turning U.S. Towns Into Major Depots” [Dalton, Ga.].  New York Times, 16 November, 1(A).

Gonzalez, G. W.  2003.  Pinnick Kinnick Hill: An American Story [W.Va.; Spanish mill town; zinc industry; Spanish translation on facing pages].  Edited by Mark Brazaitas, with a preface by Suronda Gonzalez.  Translation by Daniel D. Ferreras.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press. 246 pp.

Gonzalez, Suronda.  1999.  “Forging Their Place in Appalachia: Spanish Immigrants in Spelter, West Virginia” [zinc company town].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 5 (Fall): 197-205.

Good, Crystal.  2012.  Valley Girl [chapbook of poems].  Charleston, W.Va.(?): crystalgood.  37 pp.  W.Va. Affrilachian poet’s “valley girl” is a metaphor for victims of mountaintop removal mining and other regional toxic industries.  See Jeff Biggers review, “Valley Girl” (2012).

Gorby, W. Hal.  2010 .  “Subcultures in Conflict in Polonia: Class, Religion, and Ethnic Tensions in the Formation of Wheeling’s Polish Community, 1895–1917” [Catholic Church; tables].  West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, new series, vol. 4, no. 2 (Fall) : 1-34.

Gottlieb, Peter.  [1987] 1997.  Making Their Own Way: Southern Blacks’ Migration to Pittsburgh, 1916-30.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Gourley, Robbin.  2009.  Bring Me Some Apples and I’ll Make You a Pie: A Story About Edna Lewis [children’s book; Va. farm].  New York: Clarion Books.  45 pp.  “Includes facts about the life of Edna Lewis, a descendant of slaves who grew up to be a famous chef, and five recipes.”

Gragson, Ted L., and Paul V. Bolstad.  2007.  “A Local Analysis of Early-Eighteenth-Century Cherokee Settlement” [tables, maps].  Social Science History 31, no. 3 (Fall): 435-468.

Green, Jordan.  2001.  “No Justice; Disturbing the Peace” [Chattanooga, Tenn.; police racism, brutality].  Southern Exposure 28 (Spring/Summer): 20-22.

Green, Michael D.  2003.  “William McIntosh: The Evolution of a Creek National Idea” [1780s-1840s].  In The Human Tradition in the Old South, ed. J. Klotter, 45-62.  Wilmington, Del.: Scholarly Resources.

Gregg, Matthew T. 2005.  “Market Orientation and the Multifactor Productivity of Cherokee Indian Farmers before Removal” [1835 census].  Essays in Economic & Business History 23: 20-38.

Grenier, John.  2005.  The First Way of War: American War Making on the Frontier, 1607-1814 [Indian wars; irregular, unconventional warfare].  New York: Cambridge University Press.  232 pp.

Griffin, Larry J.  2004.  “Whiteness and Southern Identity in the Mountain and Lowland South” [tables].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 10 (Spring/Fall): 7-37.

Griffin, Patrick.  2001.  The People with No Name: Ireland’s Ulster Scots, America’s Scots Irish, and the Creation of a British Atlantic World: 1689-1764.  Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.  244 pp.

Griffin, Patrick.  2005.  “Reconsidering the Ideological Origins of Indian Removal: The Case of the Big Bottom ‘Massacre’” [1791; Muskingum River settlement; (Morgan Co., Oh.)].  Chap. 1 in The Center of a Great Empire: The Ohio Country in the Early American Republic, ed. A. Cayton and S. Hobbs, 11-35.  Athens: Ohio University Press.

Griffith, David C.  2005.  “Rural Industry and Mexican Immigration and Settlement in North Carolina” [1980s-90s].  In New Destinations: Mexican Immigration in the United States, ed. V. Zuniga and R. Hernandez-Leon, 50-75.  New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

Griffler, Keith P.  2004.  Front Line of Freedom: African Americans and the Forging of the Underground Railroad in the Ohio Valley.  Ohio River Valley Series.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  169 pp.

Griggs, Kristy Owens.  2002.  “The Removal of Blacks from Corbin in 1919: Memory, Perspective, and the Legacy of Racism” [2002 Thomas D. Clark Award winner for best undergraduate paper].  Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 100 (Summer): 293-310.

Gudmestad, Robert.  2011.  “Choctaws, Creeks, Chickasaws, Seminoles, and Cherokees Removed by Steamboat, 1830-1843.”  Appendix B in Steamboats and the Rise of the Cotton Kingdom, by R. Gudmestad, 181-182.  Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press.

Guiler, Thomas A., and Lee M. Penyak.  2009.  “Braceros and Bureaucracy: Mexican Guest Workers on the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad during the 1940s” [migrant workers; labor and treatment; WWII].  Pennsylvania History 76, no. 4 (Autumn): 422-469.  Lackawanna Co.; United States-Mexico Non-Agricultural Workers Agreement; Appendix A: “Vital Statistics” for workers; Appendix B: “Financial Information” for workers.

Guthey, Greig.  2001.  “Mexican Places in Southern Spaces: Globalization, Work, and Daily Life in and Around the North Georgia Poultry Industry.”  In Latino Workers in the Contemporary South, ed. A. D. Murphy, C. Blanchard, and J. A. Hill, 57-67.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 34.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Gutierrez, Sandra A.  2012.  “Country Fried Steaks with Cilantro-Lime Gravy” [recipe].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 28, no. 1 (Summer): 48-49.  A sampling from the author’s new cookbook, The New Southern-Latino Table: Recipes That Bring Together the Bold and Beloved Flavors of Latin America & the American South (University of North Carolina Press, 2011).

Gutman, Herbert G.  1994.  “The Negro and the United Mine Workers  of America.”  In African Americans and Non- Agricultural Labor in the South, 1865-1900, ed. D. Nieman, 49-139.  New York: Garland.

Haga, Pauline.  2000.  “A Dream Fulfilled: The Life and Times of Parthenia Edmonds” [Beckley, W.Va.; b. 1914; daughter of sharecroppers, granddaughter of slaves].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 26 (Winter): 46-51.

Hagedorn, Ann.  2003.  Beyond the River: The Untold Story of the Heroes of the Underground Railroad [John Rankin (1793-1886), Ripley, Ohio].  New York: Simon & Schuster.  333 pp.

Hahn, Steven C.  2002.  “ The Mother of Necessity: Carolina, the Creek Indians, and the Making of a New Order in the American Southeast, 1670-1763.”  In The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, 1540-1760, ed. R. Ethridge and C. Hudson, 79-114.  Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.

Hahn, Steven C.  2004.  The Invention of the Creek Nation, 1670-1763 [history, politics, first contact].  Indians of the Southeast.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  338 pp.

Hail, Raven.  2000.  The Cherokee Sacred Calendar: A Handbook of the Ancient Native American Tradition [explains 20 day signs].  Rochester, Vt.: Destiny Books.  141 pp.

Haimes-Bartolf, Melanie D.  2007.  “The Social Construction of Race and Monacan Education in Amherst County, Virginia, 1908–1965: Monacan Perspectives.”  History of Education Quarterly 47, no. 4 (Winter): 389-415.

Hall, Karen C.  2010.  Ethnobotany of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians: A Path to Sustaining Traditional Identity with an Emphasis on Medicinal Plant Use.  Seneca, S.C.: Emerald Wing Press.  94 pp.  Qualla Boundary, Swain and Jackson Cos., N.C.  Based on the author’s 2006 dissertation of the same title, and interviews with three elders.

Haluszczak, Stephen P.  2009.  Ukrainians of Western Pennsylvania.  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  127 pp.  Photo-retrospective; immigrant families; Pittsburgh.

Harlan, B. Lynne.  2009.  “My Grandmother Was a Cherokee, and My Grandpa Was a Southern Baptist Preacher.”  Appalachian Heritage 37, no. 4 (Fall): 87-91.  Cherokee heritage, “wannabes,” and formal definitions for Indian people.

Harmon, Alexandra.  2003.  “American Indians and Land Monopolies in the Gilded Age” [Cherokees, Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, Seminoles].  Journal of American History 90 (June): 106-133.

Harmon, Alexandra.  2010.  Rich Indians: Native People and the Problem of Wealth in American History.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  388 pp.  Including Cherokees and Choctaws.

Harper, Kimberly.  2010.  White Man’s Heaven: The Lynching and Expulsion of Blacks in the Southern Ozarks, 1894-1909 [Mo.].  Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press.  325 pp.

Harringtonk, M. R.  [1908] 2006.  “Catawba Potters and Their Work.”  North Carolina Archaeology 55: 89-102.  Originally published in American Anthropologist (new series) 10: 399-407.

Harris, Trudier.  2012.  “Nikki Giovanni: Literary Survivor Across Centuries.”  Appalachian Heritage 40, no. 4 (Fall): 34-47.

Harrison, Lowell H.  [1978] 2004.  The Antislavery Movement in Kentucky [1792-1865].  Reprint.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  136 pp.

Hartigan, John, Jr.  2004.  “Whiteness and Appalachian Studies: What’s the Connection?”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 10 (Spring/Fall): 58-72.

Hartigan, John.  2005.  Odd Tribes: Toward a Cultural Analysis of White People [“white trash”; Deliverance; Detroit; poverty].  Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press.  359 pp.

Harvey, Sean P.  2010.  “Must Not Their Languages Be Savage and Barbarous Like Them?” Journal of the Early Republic 30, no. 4 (Winter): 505-532.  Political debates surrounding government policies towards Indian removal.

Hashaw, Tim.  2006.  Children of Perdition: Melungeons and the Struggle of Mixed America.  The Melungeons: History, Culture, Ethnicity, & Literature.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  182 pp.

Hauptman, Laurence M.  2001.  “General John E. Wool in Cherokee Country, 1836-1837” [pre-Removal assigned peacekeeper].  Georgia Historical Quarterly 85 (Spring): 1-26.

Hausman, Blake M.  2011.  Riding the Trail of Tears [virtual-reality fiction; tragicomedy/satire].  Native Storiers series.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  370 pp.  “A surrealistic revisiting of the Cherokee Removal [1838-1839]...takes us to north Georgia in the near future, into a virtual-reality tourist compound where customers ride the Trail of Tears....Cherokee Little People have taken up residence in the virtual world and fully intend to change the ride’s programming to suit their own point of view.”

Hawkins, Benjamin.  2003.  The Collected Works of Benjamin Hawkins, 1796-1810 [U.S. Indian agent, Southeast (esp. Creek)].  Edited by Thomas Foster.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  664 pp.

Hawkins, Michael.  2002.  “Habitus and Ethnicity n the Upper South: To Enslave or Not to Enslave” [Great Appalachian Valley, Va. to Pa.].  Southeastern Geographer 42 (May): 94-113.

Hay, Fred J.  2003.  “African-American Music of Appalachia, I.”  Special issue, Black Music Research Journal 23, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 1-203.

Hay, Fred J.  2003.  “Black Musicians in Appalachia: An Introduction to Affrilachian Music.” Black Music Research Journal 23, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 1-20.

Hay, Fred J.  2003.  “Music Box Meets the Toccoa Band: The Godfather of Soul in Appalachia” [James Brown; northeast Ga., 1951-1957; Bobby Byrd].  Black Music Research Journal 23, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 103-133.

Hay, Fred J.  2004.  “African-American Music of Appalachia, II.”  Special issue, Black Music Research Journal 24, no. 1 (Spring): 1-169.

Hayden, Wilburn, Jr.  2001.  “African Americans in Appalachia: Intensification of Historical Demographic Patterns.”  In The Hidden America: Social Problems in Rural America for the Twenty-First Century, ed. R. Moore, 294-304.  Selinsgrove, Pa.: Susquehanna University Press.

Hayden, Wilburn, Jr.  2002.  “In Search of Justice: White Privilege in Appalachia” [documents urban concentrations of blacks in Appalachia].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 8 (Spring): 120-131.

Hayden, Wilburn, Jr.  2004.  “Appalachian Diversity: African-American, Hispanic/Latino, and Other Populations” [tables; 2000 Census].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 10, no. 3: 293-306.

Hayden, Wilburn.  2005.  “Barriers Confronting African Americans of the Rural Appalachian Region” [powerlessness, poverty, discrimination, prejudice, and White privilege].  In Social Work in Rural Communities, 4th edition, ed. L. Ginsberg, 401-425.

Haynes, Joshua S.  2010.  “Constructing Authenticity: The Indian Arts and Crafts Board and the Eastern Band of Cherokees, 1935–1985.”  Native South 3: 1-38.  IACB investigation of Saddlecraft, Inc. as a fraudulent producer of Indian crafts.

Haynes, Robert V.  2010.  “Natives and Interlopers.”  Chap. 12 in The Mississippi Territory and the Southwest Frontier, 1795-1817, by R. Haynes, 219-240.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Examines relations with “The Five Civilized Tribes”: Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Cherokee, and Seminole.

Heath, Barbara J., and Jack Gary, ed.  2012.  Jefferson’s Poplar Forest: Unearthing a Virginia Plantation [Bedford Co., Va., adjacent present-day Lynchburg].  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.  242 pp.  Essays; excavations; slavery.

Hebert, Keith S.  2008.  “The Bitter Trial of Defeat and Emancipation: Reconstruction in Bartow County, Georgia, 1865-1872.”  Georgia Historical Quarterly 92, no. 1 (Spring): 65-92.

Held, Rick.  2001.  “CPR for a Troubled City” [police brutality in Knoxville, Tenn.].  Southern Exposure 28 (Spring/Summer): 17-19.

Hemler, Deb.  2009.  “The Roads to Appalachia Were Paved by Geology.”  Traditions: A Journal of West Virginia Folk Culture and Educational Awareness 11: 51-53.  Terrain familiar to immigrants from Scotland, Ireland, Wales, and Italy.

Hemphill, Helen.  2008.  The Adventurous Deeds of Deadwood Jones [juvenile fiction; Civil War era].  Asheville, N.C.: Front Street.  228 pp.  “Thirteen-year-old Prometheus Jones and his eleven-year-old cousin Omer flee Tennessee and join a cattle drive that will eventually take them to Texas, where Prometheus hopes his father lives, and they find adventure and face challenges as African Americans in a land still recovering from the Civil War.”

Henderson, A. Gwynn.  1999.  “The Lower Shawnee Town on Ohio: Sustaining Native Autonomy in an Indian ‘Republic’” [Ohio Valley; 1740s-50s].  In The Buzzel About Kentuck: Settling the Promised Land, ed. C. Friend, 24-55.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Hendrick, George, and Willene Hendrick, ed.  2004.  Fleeing for Freedom: Stories of the Underground Railroad As Told by Levi Coffin and William Still [Ohio; transcribed interviews, biographies, newspaper excerpts].  Chicago: Ivan R. Dee.  209 pp.

Henige, David, and Darlene Wilson.  1998.  “Brent Kennedy’s Melungeons.”  Appalachian Journal 25 (Spring): 270-298.  Review essay of N. Brent Kennedy’s The Melungeons: Resurrection of a Proud People; An Untold Story of Ethnic Cleansing in America, 2nd ed. (Mercer University Press, 1997).  1: “ The Melungeons Become a Race,” by David Henige, 270-286.  2: “A Response to Henige,” by Darlene Wilson, 286-296.  3: “Henige Answers Wilson,” 297-298.

Henning, Denise K.  2007.  “Yes, My Daughters, We Are Cherokee Women.”  In Making Space for Indigenous Feminism, ed. Joyce Green, 187-198.  Black Point, Nova Scotia, Canada: Fernwood Publishing.

Henwood, Dawn.  1999.  “Slaveries ‘In the Borders’: Rebecca Harding Davis’s Life in the Iron Mills in Its Southern Context” [antebellum Wheeling, Va.].  Mississippi Quarterly 52 (Fall): 567-592.

Hernandez-Leon, Ruben, and Victor Zuniga.  2003.  “Mexican Immigrant Communities in the South and Social Capital: The Case of Dalton, Georgia.”  Southern Rural Sociology 19, no. 1: 20-45.

Hernandez-Leon, Ruben, and Victor Zuniga.  2000.  “‘Making Carpet by the Mile’: The Emergence of a Mexican Immigrant Community in an Industrial Region of the U.S. Historic South” [northwest Ga.].  Social Science Quarterly 81 (March): 49-66.

Hernandez-Leon, Ruben, and Victor Zuniga.  2005.  “Appalachia Meets Aztlan: Mexican Immigration and Intergroup Relations in Dalton, Georgia” [Latino population grew 600 percent, 1990-2000; carpet manufacturing].  In New Destinations: Mexican Immigration in the United States, ed. V. Zuniga and R. Hernandez-Leon, 244-273.  New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

Herrin, Roberta.  2012.  “When Cultures Wed.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 28, no. 1 (Summer): 2.  Introductory essay to special issue, “Nuevo Appalachia.”

Hicks, Brian.  2011.  “The Holdouts.”  Smithsonian 41, no. 11 (March): 50-60.  Article adapted from the book, Toward the Setting Sun: John Ross, the Cherokees, and the Trail of Tears, by Brian Hicks (Atlantic Monthly Press, 2011).

Hicks, Brian.  2011.  Toward the Setting Sun: John Ross, the Cherokees, and the Trail of Tears [1838].  New York: Atlantic Monthly Press.  421 pp.

Hidalgo, Tom.  2001.  “En las Montanas: Spaniards in Southern West Virginia” [1920s-1940; coal; community life].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 27 (Winter): 52-59.

High, Ellesa Clay.  2004.  “Diversity in Appalachia: The Lessons That Mountains Teach” [adaptations of diverse indigenous and settler cultures vs. stereotyping sovereignty].  Nantahala: A Review of Writing and Photography in Appalachia 2, no. 2 (Winter-Spring):nonfiction section, 8 paras.  http://nantahalareview.org/issue2-2/non-fiction/HIGH.htm.

Hill, Sarah H.  1997.  Weaving New Worlds: Southeastern Cherokee Women and Their Basketry.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  414 pp.

Hill, Sarah H.  2011.  “‘To Overawe the Indians and Give Confidence to the Whites’: Preparations for the Removal of the Cherokee Nation from Georgia.”  Georgia Historical Quarterly 95, no. 4 (Winter): 465-497.  Construction of federal forts and removal camps; “Georgia led all southern states in the clamor for the expulsion of the Cherokee Nation.”

Hill, Sarah H.  2012.  “Cherokee Removal Scenes: Ellijay, Georgia, 1838.”  Southern Spaces: An Interdisciplinary Journal about the Regions, Places, and Cultures of the American South and Their Global Connections, 23 August.  7,500 words, plus interactive maps, illustrations, and notes.  Sections: Introduction | Ellijay | Fort Hetzel | Removal | Recommended Resources.  http://southernspaces.org/2012/cherokee-removal-scenes-ellijay-georgia-1838.

Hill, Sarah.  2002.  “Made by the Hands of Indians: Cherokee Women and Trade [basketry].  In Neither Lady nor Slave: Working Women of the Old South, ed. S. Delfino and M. Gillespie, 34-54.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Hinshaw, John.  1997.  “The Job Strategies of Black Steelworkers in the 1960s and 1970s.”  Pittsburgh History 80 (Summer): 70-74.

Hirschman, Elizabeth Caldwell, Stephen Brown, and Pauline Maclaran.  2006.  Two Continents, One Culture: The Scotch-Irish in Southern Appalachia.  Johnson City, Tenn: Overmountain Press.  104 pp.

Hirschman, Elizabeth.  2004.  Melungeons: The Last Lost Tribe in America.  The Melungeons series.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  186 pp.

Hobson, Geary, Janet McAdams, and Kathryn Walkiewicz, ed.  2010.  The People Who Stayed: Southeastern Indian Writing After Removal [after 1830].  Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.  349 pp.  Multi-genre anthology.  Contents: Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware -- Carolinas, Tennessee, and Kentucky -- Deep South: Georgia, Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi -- Arkansas, Louisiana, and East Texas.

Hoffman, Carl.  1997.  “Building on the Past” [Lee Co., Va., Appalachian African-American Cultural Center].  Appalachia: Journal of the Appalachian Regional Commission 30 (Jan.-Apr.): 36-40.

Hoffman, Carl. 1997.  “Selena Robinson: Steel-Willed Angel” [activist; Brevard, N.C.].  Appalachia: Journal of the Appalachian Regional Commission 30 (May-August): 36-40.

Hofstra, Warren R., ed.  2012.  Ulster to America: The Scots-Irish Migration Experience, 1680-1830.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  263 pp.  Contents: Introduction: From the north of Ireland to North America: the Scots-Irish and the migration experience / Warren R. Hofstra -- Searching for a new world: the background and baggage of Scots-Irish immigrants / David W. Miller -- Searching for land: the role of New Castle, Delaware, 1720s-1770s / Marianne S. Wokeck -- Searching for order: Donegal Springs, Pennsylvania, 1720s-1730s / Richard K. MacMaster -- Searching for community: Carlisle, Pennsylvania, 1750s-1780s / Richard K. MacMaster -- Searching for peace and prosperity: Opequon settlement, Virginia, 1730s-1760s / Warren R. Hofstra -- Searching for status: Virginia’s Irish tract, 1770s-1790s / Katharine L. Brown and Kenneth W. Keller -- Searching for security: backcountry Carolina, 1760s-1780s / Michael Montgomery -- Searching for “Irish” freedom - settling for “Scotch-Irish” respectability: southwestern Pennsylvania, 1780-1810 / Peter Gilmore and Kerby A. Miller -- Searching for independence: revolutionary Kentucky, Irish American experience, and Scotch-Irish myth, 1770s-1790s / Patrick Griffin -- Afterword: historic political moderation in the Ulster-to-America diaspora / Robert M. Calhoon.

Hollifield, Adrienne.  2008.  “Barbara R. Duncan: Folklorist, Festival Organizer, Writer, and Musician.”  North Carolina Folklore Journal 55, no. 2 (Fall-Winter): 32-36.  North Carolina Folklore Society’s 2008 Brown-Hudson Folklore Award winner; author and promoter of Cherokee folklife and culture.

hooks, bell.  1996.  Bone Black: Memories of Girlhood [b. 1952, Hopkinsville, Ky.].  New York: Henry Holt.  183 pp.  “Stitching together girlhood memories with the finest threads of innocence, the author presents a powerfully intimate account of growing up in the South.”

hooks, bell.  2008.  “Free Spirits: A Legacy of Wildness” [Ky].  Appalachian Heritage 36, no. 3 (Summer): 37-39.  Special issue–“African-American Appalachian.”

hooks, bell.  2012.  “The Beloved Community: A Conversation with bell hooks.”  Interviewed by George Brosi.  Appalachian Heritage 40, no. 4 (Fall): 76-86.  Second in a series of interviews.

Horning, Audrey J.  2002.  “Myth, Migration, and Material Culture: Archaeology and the Ulster Influence on Appalachia” [NPS project; Shenandoah National Park, Va.].  Historical Archaeology 36 (Winter): 129-149.

House, Silas.  2006.  “My Country Sister” [praise for Ky. author Crystal Wilkinson].  Appalachian Heritage 34, no. 2 (Spring): 24-25.  Sidebar by Affrilachian poet Nikky Finney, “A Deep and Curious Imagination,” 26.

Howard, Elizabeth Fitzgerald.  2000.  Vergie Goes to School with Us Boys. [juvenile fiction; post-Civil War Jonesborough, Tenn.; African-American].  New York: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.  32 pp.

Howell, Rebecca Gayle, and Lucious Thompson.  2008.  “Coal America” [Ky.].  Pluck: The Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture, no. 4: 10-13.  Interview with underground miner Thompson who rails against local mountaintop removal company, TECO (Tampa Energy Company).

Hubbard, Rita L.  2007.  African Americans of Chattanooga: A History of Unsung Heroes [Tenn., biographies].  Charleston, S.C.: History Press.  155 pp.  From 1541, DeSoto’s Spanish expedition.

Hudson, Angela Pulley.  2010.  Creek Paths and Federal Roads: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves and the Making of the American South [Creek Indians; 1830s relocation].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  252 pp.

Hudson, J. Blaine.  2002.  Fugitive Slaves and the Underground Railroad in the Kentucky Borderland.  Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland.  205 pp.

Hudson, J. Blaine.  2003.  Fugitive Slaves and the Underground Railroad in the Kentucky Borderland [Ohio Valley, Ky., Tenn.].  Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland.  205 pp.

Hunter Library, Western Carolina University.  2011 (date accessed).  “Cherokee Traditions: From the Hands of our Elders” (digital collection).  Project in cooperation with: Cherokee Preservation Foundation, Qualla Arts and Crafts Mutual, and Museum of the Cherokee Indian.  Digitized photos of the artists, basketry, pottery, woodwork, and other artifacts.  http://www.wcu.edu/library/DigitalCollections/CherokeeTraditions/.

Hunter Library, Western Carolina University.  2011 (date accessed).  “The Cherokee Phoenix from Hunter Library” (digital collection).  Digitized copies of the newspaper Cherokee Phoenix  from 1828 to 1834, which was based at the Cherokee Nation’s capital of New Echota (now part of Georgia).  http://www.wcu.edu/library/DigitalCollections/CherokeePhoenix/.

Hurley, Basil.  1998.  “Tales from the Irish Tract” [3000 acres containing 18 Irish farms in 19th century W.Va.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 24 (Spring): 38-45.  Sidebars: 46-49.

Huston, James L.  2011.  “The Pregnant Economies of the Border South, 1840-1860: Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and the Possibilities of Slave-Labor Expansion.”  Chap. 6 in The Old South’s Modern Worlds: Slavery, Region, and Nation in the Age of Progress, ed. D. Barnes, B. Schoen, and F. Towers, 120-141.  New York: Oxford University Press.

Hutchens, Linda Rucker, and Ella J. Wilmont Smith.  2004.  Hall County, Georgia [photo retrospective].  Black America series.  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  128 pp.

Ingersoll, Thomas N.  2005.  To Intermix with Our White Brothers: Indian Mixed Bloods in the United States from Earliest Times to the Indian Removals.  Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.  450 pp.

Innes, Pamela.  2004.  “Medicine-Making Language among the Muskogee: The Effects of Changing Attitudes.”  In Linguistic Diversity in the South: Changing Codes, Practices, and Ideology, ed. M. Bender, 90-103.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 37.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Inscoe, John C.  1995.  “Race and Racism in Nineteenth-Century Southern Appalachia: Myths, Realities, and Ambiguities.”  In Appalachia in the Making: The Mountain South in the Nineteenth Century, ed. M. Pudup, D. Billings, and A. Waller, 103-131.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Inscoe, John C.  [1989] 1996.  Mountain Masters: Slavery and the Sectional Crisis in Western North Carolina.  Reprint.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  369 pp.

Inscoe, John C.  [1999] 2001.  “The Racial ‘Innocence’ of Appalachia: William Faulkner and the Mountain South.”  In Back Talk from Appalachia: Confronting Stereotypes, ed. D. Billings, G. Norman, and K. Ledford, 85-97.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Originally published as Confronting Appalachian Stereotypes.

Inscoe, John C.  2001.  “Introduction.”  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 1-15.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Inscoe, John C.  2001.  “Olmstead in Appalachia: A Connecticut Yankee Encounters Slavery and Racism in the Southern Highlands, 1854” [Frederick Law Olmstead].  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 154-164.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Previously published, Slavery & Abolition 9 (1988): 171-182.

Inscoe, John C.  2004.  “Race and Remembrance in West Virginia: John Henry for a Post-Modern Age” [examines the novel John Henry Days, by Colson Whitehead (Doubleday, 2001)].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 10 (Spring/Fall): 85-94.

Inscoe, John C.  2004.  “Slavery and African Americans in the Nineteenth Century.”  In High Mountains Rising: Appalachia in Time and Place, ed. R. Straw and H. Blethen, 30-45.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Inscoe, John C.  2008.  Race, War, and Remembrance in the Appalachian South.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  395 pp.  Author’s collected essays. Contents: Race and racism in nineteenth-century Appalachia: myths, realities, and ambiguities -- Between bondage and freedom: confronting the variables of Appalachian slavery and slaveholding -- Olmsted in Appalachia: a Connecticut Yankee encounters slavery in the southern highlands, 1854 -- Mountain masters as Confederate opportunists: the slave trade in western North Carolina, 1861-1865 -- The secession crisis and regional self-image: the contrasting cases of western North Carolina and East Tennessee -- Highland households divided: familial deceptions, diversions, and divisions in southern Appalachia’s inner civil war / with Gordon B. McKinney -- Coping in Confederate Appalachia: portrait of a mountain woman and her community at war -- “Moving through deserter country”: fugitive accounts of southern Appalachia’s inner civil war -- “Talking heroines”: elite mountain women as chroniclers of Stoneman’s Raid, April 1865 -- The racial “innocence” of Appalachia: William Faulkner and the mountain South -- A fugitive slave in frontier Appalachia: The Journey of August King on film -- “A northern wedge thrust into the heart of the Confederacy”: explaining Civil War loyalties in the age of Appalachian discovery, 1900-1921 -- Unionists in the attic: the Shelton Laurel Massacre dramatized -- Appalachian Odysseus: love, war, and best-sellerdom in the Blue Ridge -- Guerrilla war and remembrance: reconstructing a father’s murder and a community’s civil war -- Race and remembrance in West Virginia: John Henry for a postmodernist age -- In defense of Appalachia on film: Hollywood, history, and the highland South.

Inscoe, John C.  2011.  Writing the South Through the Self: Explorations in Southern Autobiography.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  249 pp.  Contents: Lessons from Southern lives: teaching race through autobiography -- “I learn what I am”: adolescent struggles with mixed-race identity -- “All manner of defeated, shiftless, shifty, pathetic and interesting good people”: autobiographical encounters with Southern white poverty -- Railroads, race, and remembrance: the traumas of train travel in the Jim Crow South -- “I’m better than this sorry place”: coming to terms with self and the South in college -- Sense of place, sense of being: Appalachian struggles with identity, belonging, and escape -- Afterword: “Getting pretty fed up with this two-tone South”: moving toward multiculturalism [Melungeons, Cherokees, Asians, Latinos].

Inscoe, John C., ed.  2001.  Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation [18 essays].  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  392 pp.

Irwin, Ned L.  2003.  “Cone and Adler: Old World Ways and a New World Business” [1850s-60s Jonesboro; German-Jewish merchants].  Journal of East Tennessee History 74 (2002): 38-57.

Ishii, Izumi.  2003.  “Alcohol and Politics in the Cherokee Nation before Removal.”  Ethnohistory 50 (Fall): 671-695.

Ishii, Izumi.  2003.  “Alcohol and Politics in the Cherokee Nation before Removal.”  Ethnohistory 50 (Fall): 671-695.

Ishii, Izumi.  2008.  Bad Fruits of the Civilized Tree: Alcohol & the Sovereignty of the Cherokee Nation.  Indians of the Southeast series.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  260 pp.  Traces more than two centuries.

Jackson, Stevan R.  2006.  “Peoples of Appalachia: Cultural Diversity within the Mountain Region” [with suggested readings].  In A Handbook to Appalachia: An Introduction to the Region, ed. G. Edwards, J. Asbury, and R. Cox, 27-49.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Jamison, Philip A.  2003.  “Square Dance Calling: The African-American Connection.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 9 (Fall): 387-398.

Janda, Sarah Eppler.  2007.  Beloved Women: The Political Lives of LaDonna Harris and Wilma Mankiller [Comanche activist, and Cherokee leader].  DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.  232 pp.

Jefferson County Black History Preservation Society (W.Va.).  2009.  African Americans of Jefferson County [photo-retrospective].  Foreword by Sen. Robert C. Byrd.  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  127 pp.

Jenkins, Bobby.  2002.  “Citizen of the Appalachians” [Charles Litton, Norton, Va., whose integrated Little League team won the State Championship in 1951].  Appalachian Heritage 30 (Summer): 24-31.

Jennings, Kathy.  1998.  “White Like Me: A Confession on Race, Region, and Class.”  Appalachian Journal 25 (Winter): 150-174.

Jennings, Matthew.  2011.  New Worlds of Violence: Cultures and Conquests in the Early American Southeast.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  270 pp.  Contents: Introduction: cultures of violence -- Violence in the Mississippian world -- Spanish and Mississippian violence -- The fight for Florida -- Violence after the entrada -- Creating English conquest -- Violence and the founding of English Carolina -- Violence in the era of the Yamasee War -- American nations, American violence.

Johnson, Charles Blake.  1995.  The Chosen One [adolescent fiction; Cherokee; sequel to The Last Beloved Woman].  Townsend, Tenn.: American Trail Books.  112 pp.

Johnson, Jay K.  2000.  “The Chickasaws” [Miss.].  In Indians of the Greater Southeast: Historical Archaeology and Ethnohistory, ed. B. McEwan, 85-121.  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.

Johnson, Mildred, and Theresa Delsoin.  2005.  Malindy’s Freedom: The Story of a Slave Family [1820-1865; freeborn Cherokee unlawfully enslaved as a child].  Edited by Stuart Symington and Anne W. Symington.  St. Louis: Missouri Historical Society Press.  215 pp.

Johnson, Susan.  2002.  “West Virginia Rubber Workers in Akron” [outmigration, 1910s-1950s].  In Transnational West Virginia: Ethnic Communities and Economic Change, 1840-1940, ed. K. Fones-Wolf and R. Lewis, 298-315. West Virginia and Appalachia series, no. 1.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.

Johnson-Web, Karen D.  2002.  “Employer Recruitment and Hispanic Labor Migration: North Carolina Urban Areas at the End of the Millennium.”  Professional Geographer 54 (August): 406-421.

Johnston, Carolyn.  2003.  Cherokee Women in Crisis: Trail of Tears, Civil War, and Allotment, 1838-1907 [gender roles; matriarchal society]. Contemporary American Indian Studies.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  227 pp.

Jolley, Harley E.  2007.  “‘I Want a Job and I Don’t Mean Maybe!’:The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the CCC .”  Chap. 7 in That Magnificent Army of Youth and Peace: The Civilian Conservation Corps in North Carolina, 1933-1942, by H. Jolley, 121-127.  Raleigh: Office of Archives and History, North Carolina Dept. of Cultural Resources.

Jolley, Harley E.  2007.  “‘Not in My Backyard’ v. ‘The Best Years of My Life’: Tar Heel African Americans and the CCC.”  Chap. 6 in That Magnificent Army of Youth and Peace: The Civilian Conservation Corps in North Carolina, 1933-1942, by H. Jolley, 102-120.  Raleigh: Office of Archives and History, North Carolina Dept. of Cultural Resources.

Jones, J. McHenry.  2010 [1896].  Hearts of Gold: A Novel [W.Va.; African American community at the turn of the last century; opposing racial injustices; convict coal miners].  Edited by John Ernest and Eric Gardner.  Regenerations: African American Literature and Culture series, no. 1.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.  306 pp.  Originally published: Wheeling, W.Va.: Daily Intelligencer Steam Job Press.

Jones, Nancy Bondurant.  2007.  An African American Community of Hope: Zenda: 1869-1930 [Rockingham Co., Va.; slavery/emancipation].  McGaheysville, Va.: Long’s Chapel Preservation Society.  139 pp.

Jones, Veda Boyd.  2006.  Nellie the Brave: The Cherokee Trail of Tears [juvenile fiction; 1838; Christian fiction].  Sisters in Time.  Uhrichsville, Ohio: Barbour. 140 pp.

Jones, William S.  2004.  “Tennessee Places: The Legacy of the Trail of Tears in Van Buren County.”  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 63 (Spring): 48-52.

Jordan, Norman.  1999.  “An African American Landmark in Fayette County: Camp Washington-Carver” [opened 1942 as a 4-H camp for African Americans].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 25 (Winter): 56-63.

Joslin, Michael.  2012.  “Joara: Tracing a Sixteenth-Century Spanish Presence in Appalachia” [Burke Co., N.C.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 28, no. 1 (Summer): 4-6.  Archaeological dig; Juan Pardo expedition; 1566-68 settlements.

Juricek, John T.  2010.  Colonial Georgia and the Creeks: Anglo-Indian Diplomacy on the Southern Frontier, 1733-1763.  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.  397 pp.

Justice, Daniel Heath.  2006.  Our Fire Survives the Storm: A Cherokee Literary History.  Indigenous Americas.  Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.  277 pp.

Juul, Kitty.  2012.  “Blessings from South of the Border.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 28, no. 1 (Summer): 3-39.  Profiles two Latino immigrants of east Tennessee: Dr. Frank Montenegro, from Peru; and Carmen Zepeda, from El Salvador.

Kahrl, Andrew W.  2008.  “The Political Work of Leisure: Class, Recreation, and African American Commemoration at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, 1881-1931.”  Journal of Social History 42, no. 1 (Fall): 57-77.  Jim Crow laws imposed by Storer College; attorney J. R. Clifford.

Kandel, William.  2004.  New Patterns of Hispanic Settlement in Rural America [maps, tables].  Rural Development Research Report, no. 99.  Washington: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.  Economic Research Service.  44 pp.  http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/rdrr99/.

Karas, Nicholas Stevensson.  2004.  Hunky: The Immigrant Experience [novelization; Slavs recruited to Pa.’s mills and mines].  Bloomington, Ind.: 1st Books.  501 pp.

Karickhoff, Connie.  1998.  “Photographer William H. Jordan: A Portrait of Ansted’s Black Community” [Fayette Co.; 1930s and 40s]. Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 24 (Winter): 44-51.

Kasdorf, Julia.  1997.  “Mountains, Valleys, and a Place to Begin” [Mennonite Kishacoquillas Valley, Central Pa.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 14 (Winter): 3-4.

Keefe, Susan E., and Jodie D. Manross.  1999.  “Race, Religion, and Community: The Demolition of a Black Church” [Boone Chapel, Watauga Co., N.C.; built 1898].  Appalachian Journal 26 (Spring): 252-263.

Kegley, Mary B.  2008.  “Indian Slavery and Freedom Suits: The Cases of Rachel Viney and Rachel Findlay.”  The Smithfield Review: Studies in the History of the Region West of the Blue Ridge 12: 87-92.  Southwest Va., 1815 and 1820.

Keller, Kenneth W.  1997.  “The Outlook of Rhinelanders on the Virginia Frontier.”  In Diversity and Accommodation: Essays on the Cultural Composition of the Virginia Frontier,  ed. M. Puglisi, 99-126.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Kelly, Brian.  1998.  “Policing the ‘Negro Eden’: Racial Paternalism in the Alabama Coalfields, 1908-1921.  Part One.”  Alabama Review 51 ( July): 163-183.

Kelly, Brian.  1998.  “Policing the ‘Negro Eden’: Racial Paternalism in the Alabama Coalfields, 1908-1921.  Part Two.”  Alabama Review 51 (October): 243-265.

Kelly, Brian.  2001.  Race, Class, and Power in the Alabama Coalfields, 1908-21.  The Working Class in American History.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.  264 pp.

Kelton, Paul.  2002.  “The Great Southeastern Smallpox Epidemic, 1696-1700: The Region’s First Major Epidemic?”  In The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, 1540-1760, ed. R. Ethridge and C. Hudson, 21-37.  Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.

Kelton, Paul.  2004.  “Avoiding the Smallpox Spirits: Colonial Epidemics and Southeastern Indian Survival” [Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Muskogee].  Ethnohistory 51, no. 1 (Winter): 45-71.

Kelton, Paul.  2007.  Epidemics and Enslavement: Biological Catastrophe in the Native Southeast, 1492-1715.  Indians of the Southeast series.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  288 pp.

Kennedy, N. Brent, and Robyn V. Kennedy.  [1994] 1997. The Melungeons: The Resurrection of a Proud People: An Untold Story of Ethnic Cleansing in America.  2nd rev. ed.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  180 pp.

Kenny, Kevin.  1995.  “The Molly Maguires and the Catholic Church.”  Labor History 36 (Summer): 345-376.

Kenzer, Robert C.  1994.  “Black Businessmen in Post-Civil War  Tennessee.”  Journal of East Tennessee History 66: 59-80.

Kessler, John S., and Donald B. Ball.  2001.  North From the Mountains: A Folk History of the Carmel Melungeon Settlement, Highland County, Ohio.  Melungeons series, no. 2.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  220 pp.

Kharif, Wali R.  2004.  “Slavery, Freedom, and Citizenship: African American Contributions to the Upper Cumberland” [Ky., Tenn.; Census table, 1860].  In Rural Life and Culture in the Upper Cumberland, ed. M. Birdwell and W. Dickinson, 105-121.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Kharif, Wali Rashash, and William Lynwood Montell.  2005.  Reminisces and Reflections: African Americans in the Kentucky-Tennessee Upper Cumberland Since the Civil War [oral records].  London, Ky.: Janze Publications.  341 pp.

Kight, Caitlin.  2012.  “Ohio’s Casa Nueva: A National Leader in Entrepreneurism.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 28, no. 1 (Summer): 41-43.  History of the first Mexican restaurant in Athens, Ohio – much beloved, cooperatively owned, buys from local producers.

Killebrew, Libby Pearson; Kennedy, N. Brent; Everett, C. S.  2000.  Letters to the editor in response to C. S. Everett’s “Melungeon History and Myth” [Appalachian Journal 26 (Summer, 1999): 358-409].  1: Libby Pearson Killebrew, 120-123.  2: N. Brent Kennedy, 124-128.  3: “Everett Answers Killebrew and Kennedy: A Dissenting Voice in the Discourse of Descent,” 129-140.  Appalachian Journal 27 (Winter): 120-140.

Kimmons, Rebecca.  2012.  “‘We’re Here for Service: United Gospel Singers” [Fayette Co.; since 1959].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 38, no. 4 (Winter): 18-23.

Klaus, William B.  2002.  “Uneven Americanization: Italian Immigration to Marion County, 1900-1925” [charts].  In Transnational West Virginia: Ethnic Communities and Economic Change, 1840-1940, ed. K. Fones-Wolf and R. Lewis, 190-214. West Virginia and Appalachia series, no. 1.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.

Kline, Michael, and Carrie Nobel Kline.  2005.  Come to the Old Country: A Handbook for Preserving and Sharing Schuylkill County’s Cultural Heritage [Pa. anthracite coal region; profiles 18 ethnic groups].  Edited by Cory R. Kegerise.  Pottstown, Pa.: Produced under contract with The Schuylkill River National & State Heritage Area.  71 pp.  Available online at http://www.schuylkillriver.org/pdf/ethnic_heritage_study.pdf.

Kline, Michael.  1997.  “Hand-Clapping and Hallelujahs: A Visit with Ethel Caffie-Austin”  [W.Va.’s “First Lady of Gospel Music”].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 23 (Winter): 28-35.

Kline, Michael.  2002.  “Where the Ravens Roost: Songs and Ceremonies of Big Cove” [Cherokee, N.C.].  In American Musical Traditions. Vol. 1, Native American Music, ed. J. Titon and B. Carlin, 15-18.  New York: Schirmer Reference.

Knepp, Gary L.  2008.  Freedom’s Struggle: A Response to Slavery from the Ohio Borderlands.  Milford, Oh.: Little Miami Publishing Co.  260 pp.  Underground railroad; Clermont County.

Knouff, Gregory T.  2005.  “Whiteness and Warfare on a Revolutionary Frontier” [1770s].  In Friends and Enemies in Penn’s Woods: Indians, Colonists, and the Racial Construction of Pennsylvania, ed. W. Pencak and D. Richter, 238-257.  University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.

Knowles, Anne Kelly.  1997.  Calvinists Incorporated: Welsh Immigrants on Ohio’s Industrial Frontier [1830-1870; Gallia and Jackson Counties; charcoal iron furnace industry].  University of Chicago Geography Research Paper, no. 240. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.  330 pp.

Knowles, Anne Kelly.  2002.  “Wheeling Iron and the Welsh: A Geographical Reading of Life in the Iron Mills” [1861; early “realist” fiction by Rebecca Harding Davis].  In Transnational West Virginia: Ethnic Communities and Economic Change, 1840-1940, ed. K. Fones-Wolf and R. Lewis, 216-241.  West Virginia and Appalachia series, no. 1.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.

Konhaus, Tim.  2007.  “‘I Thought Things Would Be Different There’: Lynching and the Black Community in Southern West Virginia, 1880-1933.”  West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, new series, vol. 1, no. 2 (Fall): 25-43.  [W.Va. led the U.S. in lynchings, 1890-1900; anti-lynching legislation passed, 1921].

Kornweibel, Theodore.  2010.  Railroads in the African American Experience: A Photographic Journey.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.  557 pp.  Sixteen chapters -- the first two discuss ex-slaves and the convict lease system: 1. “Negroes will do more work”: slavery and the dawn of Southern railroading -- 2. “Wasn’t no equipment - it was manual labor”: construction and track laborers.

Kraina, Jane, and Mary Zwierzchowski.  1998.  “Death of a Gypsy King” [Zeke Marks; 1931; Weirton, W.Va.]. Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 24 (Winter): 18-22.

Krause, Bonnie J.  2003.  “‘We Did Move Mountains!’ Lucy Saunders Herring, North Carolina Jeanes Supervisor and African American Educator, 1916-1968” [Asheville, Buncombe Co.].  North Carolina Historical Review 80 (April): 188-212.

Krause, Bonnie J.  2012.  “Passing On the Ancestor’s Tradition: Amanda Crowe, Woodcarver and Teacher.”  North Carolina Folklore Journal 59, no. 1 (Spring-Summer): 52-71.  Born 1928 on the Qualla Boundary of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

Kraver, Jeraldine.  2002.  “‘Mobile Images’: Myth and Resistance in Nikky Finney’s Rice” [Toronto: Sister Vision P (1995); Finney is a founding member of the Affrilachian Poets].  Southern Literary Journal 34 (Spring): 134-147.

Kulina, Anita.  2003.  Millhunks and Renegades: A Portrait of a Pittsburgh Neighborhood [Greenfield; ethnic relations; history].  Pittsburgh, Pa.: Brandt Street Press.  159 pp.

Lakin, Matthew.  2000.  “‘A Dark Night’: The Knoxville Race Riot of 1919.”  Journal of East Tennessee History 72: 1-29.

Lambert, Leonard Carson, as told to Michael C. Lambert.  2011.  Up from These Hills: Memories of a Cherokee Boyhood [1930s-1940s; N.C., Tenn.].  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  197 pp.  Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

Lambert, Leonard Carson Jr., as told to Michael Lambert.  2011.  “Cherokee Ceremonial Life.” Appalachian Heritage 39, no. 3 (Summer): 42-45.  Reprinted from Up from These Hills (University of Nebraska Press, 2011).

Lambert, Valerie.  2007.  Choctaw Nation: A Story of American Indian Resurgence.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  302 pp.

Langdon, Barbara Tracy.  1998.  The Melungeons: An Annotated Bibliography: References in Both Fiction and Non-Fiction.  Woodville, Tex.: Dogwood Press.  82 pp.

Lange, Linda.  2008.  “Remembering the African American History of Chattanooga, Tennessee.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 24, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 44-46.  Discusses Bessie Smith, Chattanooga African-American Museum, Chattanooga Regional History Museum, and black heritage sites.

Langguth, A. J.  2010.  Driven West: Andrew Jackson and the Trail of Tears to the Civil War. New York: Simon & Schuster.  466 pp.

Latinos in the South [five articles: Ga., Ala., Ark.].  2003.  Guest editors, Rogelio Saenz and Cruz Torres.  Special issue, Southern Rural Sociology 19, no. 1: 1-122.

Lawrence, Randy, and Ken Sullivan.  1997. “Black Migration to Southern West Virginia, 1870-1930.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 23 (Winter): 52-53.  Previously published, Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 5, no.4, 1979.

Ledford, Martha.  2009.  “The Gift” [of Cherokee language, lost then relearned; lesson].  Appalachian Heritage 37, no. 4 (Fall): 94-95.

Lefler, Lisa J.  2005.  “Promoting Wellness among the Eastern Band of Cherokees.”  Chap. 10 in Appalachian Cultural Competency: A Guide for Medical, Mental Health, and Social Service Professionals, ed. S. Keefe, 219-239.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Lefler, Lisa J.  2009.  Under the Rattlesnake: Cherokee Health and Resiliency.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  166 pp.  Contents: Tohi: the Cherokee concept of well-being / Heidi M. Altman and Thomas N. Belt -- The unintended consequences of prehistoric skeletal studies to modern Cherokee communities / Michelle D. Hamilton and Russell G. Townsend -- Adverse reactions: practicing bioarchaeology among the Cherokee / Michelle D. Hamilton -- Historical trauma, stress, and diabetes: a modern model among the Eastern Band of Cherokees / Lisa J. Lefler and Roseanna Belt -- The effect of traditional dietary practices on contemporary diseases among the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians / David N. Cozzo -- The sacred feminine in Cherokee culture: healing and identity / Jenny James.

Lepper, Bradley T.  2005.  Ohio Archaeology: An Illustrated Chronicle of Ohio’s Ancient American Indian Cultures [“with feature articles contributed by over 20 archaeologists and scholars”].  Wilmington, Ohio: Orange Frazer Press.  300 pp.

Letwin, Daniel.  1997.  The Challenge of Interracial Unionism: Alabama Coal Miners, 1878-1921.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Levin, Marjorie, ed.  1999.  The Jews of Wilkes-Barre: 150 Years (1845-1995) in the Wyoming Valley of Pennsylvania.  Wilkes-Barre, Pa.: Jewish Community Center of Wyoming Valley.  367 pp.

Lewis, Courtney.  2012.  “The Case of the Wild Onions: The Impact of Ramps on Cherokee Rights” [N.C.].  Southern Cultures 18, no. 2 (Summer): 104-117.  Essay discussing “the 2009 U.S. federal case ‘U.S. v. Burgess,’ which involved the Cherokee Indians’ cultural rights to their historical growing of ramps” in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and Burgess’ alleged illegal harvesting.

Lewis, David, Jr., and Ann T. Jordan.  2002.  Creek Indian Medicine Ways: The Enduring Power of Mvskoke Religion.  Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.  194 pp.

Lewis, Ronald L.  1994.  “Job Control and Race Relations in the  Coal Fields, 1870-1920.”  In African Americans and  Non-Agricultural Labor in the South, 1865-1900, ed. D. Nieman, 245-275.  New York: Garland.

Lewis, Ronald L.  1996.  “Coal Miners and the Social Equality Wedge in Alabama, 1880-1908.”  In The United Mine Workers of America: A Model of Industrial Solidarity?, ed. J. Laslett, 297-319.  University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.

Lewis, Ronald L.  2001.  “African American Convicts in the Coal Mines of Southern Appalachia.”  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 259-283.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Previously published as chapter 2 in Ronald L. Lewis, Black Coal Miners in America, Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1987.

Lewis, Ronald L.  2002.  “Americanizing Immigrant Coal Miners in Northern West Virginia: Monongalia County between the World Wars” [tables; Scotts Run].  In Transnational West Virginia: Ethnic Communities and Economic Change, 1840-1940, ed. K. Fones-Wolf and R. Lewis, 260-296. West Virginia and Appalachia series, no. 1.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.

Lewis, Ronald L.  2008.  Welsh Americans: A History of Assimilation in the Coalfields.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  395 pp.

Lichtenstein, Alex.  1995.  “Racial Conflict and Racial Solidarity in the Alabama Coal Strike of 1894: New Evidence for the Gutman-Hill Debate.”  Labor History 36 (Winter): 63-76.

Lifford, Brad.  2012.  “Documentary Describes an Annual Cuban Reunion in East Tennessee” [Kingsport].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 28, no. 1 (Summer): 71-72.  Film review of Mountain Mojo: A Cuban Pig Roast in East Tennessee, produced by East Tennessee State University, directed by Fred Sauceman.

Lightfoot, William E.  2003.  “The Three Doc(k)s: White Blues in Appalachia” [core African-American blues in the repertoires of Dock Boggs, A.P. ("Doc") Carter and family, and Doc Watson].  Black Music Research Journal 23, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 167-193.

Lilly, John, ed.  2005.  An Introduction to West Virginia Ethnic Communities [descriptions; maps; contacts].  Charleston, W.Va: Goldenseal magazine.  94 pp.  Also online:  http://www.wvculture.org/arts/ethnic/index.html.  Contents: Eastern Panhandle: African American -- Hungarian / Metro Valley: African American -- Asian American -- Greek -- Irish -- Japanese -- Jewish -- Middle Eastern -- Native American -- Scottish -- Other / Mid-Ohio Valley: African American -- Asian American -- Jewish -- Native American -- Other / Mountain Lakes: Irish -- Slovenian / Mountaineer Country: African American -- Carpatho-Russian -- Carpatho-Ruthenian -- Greek -- Italian -- Japanese -- Middle Eastern -- Native American -- Other / New River/Greenbrier Valley: African American -- Carpatho-Russian -- Irish -- Italian -- Jewish -- Middle Eastern -- Native American -- Spanish / Northern Panhandle: African American -- Carpatho-Russian -- Carpatho-Ruthenian -- Croatian -- Czechoslovakian -- Finnish -- German -- Greek -- Irish -- Italian -- Jewish -- Middle Eastern -- Polish -- Serbian -- Ukrainian -- Other / Potomac Highlands: African American -- German -- Scottish -- Swiss.

Lilly, John.  2011.  “Stepping!”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 37, no. 1 (Spring): 46-51.  Origins and techniques of African American stepping (dance); step show competitions among black fraternity and sorority members at West Virginia State University at Institute.  Sidebar review of the book, Soulstepping: African American Step Shows (2003), by Elizabeth C. Fine, 51.

Linebaugh, Donald W.  1998.  “Folk Art, Architecture, and Artifact: Toward a Material Understanding of the German Culture in the Upper Valley of Virginia.”  In The Southern Colonial Backcountry: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Frontier Communities, ed. D. Crass, et al., 200-220.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Littleton, Robert A.  2003.  “Community among African American Students on Small, Predominantly White Campuses: The Unforeseen ‘Minority within a Minority’ Experience” [experiences of 16 black students at four Appalachian colleges].  NASPA Journal 40 (Summer): 83-104.  http://publications.naspa.org/naspajournal/vol40/iss4/art6/.

Lloyd, Earl, and Sean Peter Kirst.  2010.  Moonfixer: The Basketball Journey of Earl Lloyd [b. 1928].  Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press.  142 pp.  Lloyd led West Virginia State College to basketball championships in 1948 and 1949, and was the first African American to play in an NBA game, on October 31, 1950.

Locklear, Erica Abrams.  2009.  “Consenting to Create: The Affrilachian Movement.”  In CrossRoads: A Southern Culture Annual, 2009, ed. Ted Olson and Ajay Kalra, 169-185.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  Blackness in Appalachia; ethnicity within Appalachian literature; author Crystal Wilkinson.

Loller, Travis.  2012.  “DNA Study Seeks Origin of Appalachia’s Melungeons.”  Yahoo! News [AP story; dateline, Nashville], 24 May.  1,040 words.  “Genetic evidence shows that the families historically called Melungeons are the offspring of sub-Saharan African men and white women of northern or central European origin.”  http://news.yahoo.com/dna-study-seeks-origin-appalachias-melungeons-201144041.html.

Longenecker, Stephen L.  2000.  “The Narrow Path: Antislavery, Plainness, and the Mainstream” [Rockingham Co., Va., Mennonites, Methodists, and Dunkers].  In After the Backcountry: Rural Life in the Great Valley of Virginia, 1800-1900, ed. K. Koons and W. Hofstra, 185-193. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Longo, Stephanie.  2004.  Italians of Northeastern Pennsylvania [photo-retrospective].  Images of America.  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  128 pp.

Lovett, Bobby L.  2005.  The Civil Rights Movement in Tennessee: A Narrative History [Knoxville, Chattanooga, Nashville, Memphis].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  483 pp.

Lovett, Laura L.  2002.  “‘African and Cherokee by Choice’: Race and Resistance under Legalized Segregation.” Chap. 7 in Confounding the Color Line: The Indian-Black Experience in North America, ed. J. Brooks, 192-222.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Lucas, Marion B.  1997.  “African Americans on the Kentucky Frontier” [1751-1800].  Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 95 (Spring): 121-134.

Luconi, Stefano.  1996.  “The Origin and Development of the Italian Community in Patton, Pennsylvania” [Cambria County].  The Pennsylvania Geographer 34 (Fall/Winter): 135-149.

Luconi, Stefano.  1999.  “The Machine Boss as a Symbolic Leader” [John R. Torquato; Italian Americans; Cambria Co., Pa.; 1928-1975].  Oral History Review 26 (Winter/Spring): 45-66.

Lumpkin, Shirley.  2006.  “Swinging Bridges: The Poetry of Awiakta” [Marilou Awiakta, b. 1936].  Journal of Kentucky Studies 23 (September): 147-153.

MacRae, Ann Cameron.  2006.  “Country Goods and Looking Glasses: An Appalachian Community Moves to a Free Economy” [1850s-1880s; Jonesborough, Washington Co., Tenn.; from slaves to free black customers at D.B. Barkley’s country store].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 12, no. 1 (Spring): 102-110.

Madarasz, Anne.  2012.  “We Are the Ship: Art and Inspiration.”  Western Pennsylvania History 95, no. 2 (Summer): 20-29.  Commemorating the Pittsburgh Crawfords and The Grays; reprints illustrations from Kadir Nelson’s children’s book, We Are the Ship: The Story of Negro League Baseball (2008).

Makricosta, Pamela.  1997.  “A Bundle of Treasures: Greeks in West Virginia.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 23 (Winter): 36-45.

Mallinson, Christine, and Becky Childs.  2004.  “The Intersection of Regional and Ethnic Identity: African American English in Appalachia.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 10 (Spring/Fall): 129-142.

Mallinson, Christine, and Becky Childs.  2007.  “Communities of Practice in Sociolinguistic Description: Analyzing Language and Identity Practices among Black Women in Appalachia.” Gender and Language 1, no. 2: 173-206.

Mallinson, Christine.  2004.  “Constructing Ethnolinguistic Groups: A Sociolinguistic Case Study” [nonwhite community; Beech Bottom, Avery Co., N.C.].  In Linguistic Diversity in the South: Changing Codes, Practices, and Ideology, ed. M. Bender, 66-79.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 37.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Mankiller, Wilma Pearl, and Michael Wallis.  1993.  Mankiller: A Chief and Her People [biography].  New York: St. Martin’s Press.  292 pp.  Mankiller (1945-2010) was principal chief of the Cherokee Nation, 1985-1995.

Mann, Barbara Alice.  2005.  George Washington’s War on Native America [1775-1782].  Westport, Conn: Praeger.  295 pp.

Mann, Barbara Alice.  2009.  The Tainted Gift: The Disease Method of Frontier Expansion. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Praeger.  180 pp.  Chapter 1 examines 1763 [Upper] Ohio Indians, Fort Pitt, and smallpox; Chapter 2 covers 1832 Choctaw Removal and cholera in Mississippi.

Marcoux, Jon Bernard.  2010.  Pox, Empire, Shackles, and Hides: The Townsend Site, 1670-1715 [Cherokee; Tenn.].  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  178 pp.

Margolies, Daniel S.  2009.  “Latino Migrant Music and Identity in the Borderlands of the New South.”  Journal of American Culture 32, no. 2 (June): 114–125.  Mount Airy, N.C., and surrounding states.

Margolies, Daniel S.  2012.  “Taquerias and Tiendas in the Blue Ridge: Viewing the Transormation of Space in a Globalized Appalachia.”  Appalachian Journal 39, no. 3-4 (Spring/Summer): 246-268.  Latino migration; western N.C. and Va.

Marsh, Dawn.  2009.  “Creating Delaware Homelands in the Ohio Country” [Western Pa.; Ohio].  Ohio History 116: 26-40.

Marty, Debian.  1999.  “White Antiracist Rhetoric as Apologia: Wendell Berry’s The Hidden Wound.”  In Whiteness: The Communication of Social Identity, ed. T. Nakayama, J. Martin, 51-68.  Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications.

Mason, Matthew.  2002.  “Paddy vs. Paddy: Labor Unrest and Provincial Identities along the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad” [Irish; 1840s-50s].  In Transnational West Virginia: Ethnic Communities and Economic Change, 1840-1940, ed. K. Fones-Wolf and R. Lewis, 2-17.  West Virginia and Appalachia series, no. 1.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.

Maureen Meyers.  2008.  “Excavating a Mississippian Frontier: Fieldwork at the Carter Robinson Mound Site” [Lee County, Va.; AD 900–1550].  Native South 1: 27-44.

Maya, Camellia.  2006.  “Issa Yousef Maayeh’s Appalachian Journey” [1910-2006; from 1948 Jordan to Scott Co., Va.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 22, no. 1 (Spring): 37-39.

McClain, Dani.  2010.  “The Only One for Most of Her Life: An Interview on Race, Gender, and Art (and Beyond) with Kathy Y. Wilson.”  Pluck: The Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture, no. 5: 22-28.  Wilson is an Ohio journalist, social critic, and poet.

McClelland, Janice M.  1997.  “A Structural Analysis of Desegregation: Clinton High School, 1954-1958" [Anderson Co., Tenn., near Oak Ridge].  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 56 (Winter): 296-309.

McConnell, Michael N.  2010.  “Before the Great Road: Indian Travelers on the Great Warriors’ Path.”  Chap. 2 in The Great Valley Road of Virginia: Shenandoah Landscapes from Prehistory to the Present, ed. W. Hofstra and K. Raitz, 57-78.  Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.

McCoy, Michael B.  2012.  “Forgetting Freedom: White Anxiety, Black Presence, and Gradual Abolition in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, 1780–1838.”  Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 136, no. 2 (April): 141-170.

McDaniel, Paul N., and Anita I. Drever.  2009.  “Ethnic Enclave or International Corridor? Immigrant Businesses in a New South City.”  Southeastern Geographer 49, no. 1 (Spring): 3-23.  Birmingham, Ala.; Latinos and Asians; maps and tables.

McGlinchey, Frazer Dorian.  2006.  “‘A Superior Civilization’: Appropriation, Negotiation, and Interaction in the Northwest Territory, 1787-1795” [Marietta, Oh.].  Chap. 6 in The Boundaries between Us: Natives and Newcomers along the Frontiers of the Old Northwest Territory, 1750-1850, ed. D. Barr, 118-142.  Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press.

McKee, Larry.  2000.  “The Archaeological Study of Slavery and Plantation Life in Tennessee.”  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 59 (Fall): 188-203.

McKinney, Gordon B.  2001.  “Southern Mountain Republicans and the Negro, 1865-1900.”  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 199-219.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Previously published, The Journal of Southern History 41 (1975): 473-495.

McKinney, Maggie.  2012.  “Dancing in Appalachia – Latino Style” [Morganton, N.C.; Latino immigrants].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 28, no. 1 (Summer): 33-35.  Describes “the excitement surrounding the quinceañera, a rite of passage for girls who reach the age of fifteen.”

McKinney, Maggie.  2012.  “Looking for a Home” [Mitchell Co., N.C.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 28, no. 1 (Summer): 26-28.  Latino family’s struggle to find adequate housing.

McLoughlin, William G.  1994.  The Cherokees and Christianity,  1794-1870: Essays on Acculturation and Cultural Persistence.   Edited by Walter H. Conser, Jr.  Athens: University of Georgia  Press.  360 pp.

McLoughlin, William G.  [1984] 1995.  Cherokees and Missionaries, 1789-1839.  Second ed., with a foreword by William L. Anderson.  Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.  375 pp.

McMillian, Don Daniel.  2008.  The Underground Railroad: Lawrence County, Ohio and Cabell County, Virginia.  Charleston, S.C.: BookSurge.  234 pp.

McNeese-Mechan, Amy.  2006.  “Review Essay: Celeste Ray’s Transatlantic Scots” [University of Alabama Press (2005); migrants 1600-1950s; stereotypes].  Appalachian Journal 33, no. 3-4 (Spring/Summer): 344-350.

Megginson, W. J.  2006.  African American Life in South Carolina’s Upper Piedmont, 1780-1900 [Anderson, Pickens, Oconee Cos.].  Columbia: University of South Carolina Press.  546 pp.

Mehta, Rahul.  2011.  “West Virginia’s Palace of Gold” [op-ed].  New York Times, 29 October, 21(A).  869 words.  Opulent Indian temple opened in 1979 at Hare Krishna commune, New Vrindaban, near Moundsville, W.Va.

Meredith, Mary Ellen, and Howard Meredith.  2003.  Reflection on Cherokee Literary Expression [portrait drawings of seven].  Native American Studies, no. 12.  Lewiston, N.Y.: Edwin Mellen Press.  128 pp.

Merrell, James Hart.  [1989] 2009.  The Indians’ New World: Catawbas and Their Neighbors from European Contact Through the Era of Removal [N.C., S.C.].  Reprint, 20th anniversary ed., with a new introduction by the author.  Chapel Hill: published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture by the University of North Carolina Press.  381 pp.

Merritt, Jane T.  2003.  At the Crossroads: Indians and Empires on a Mid-Atlantic Frontier, 1700-1763  [Pa.].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture, Williamsburg, Va.  338 pp.

Milbauer, John A.  2000.  “Fish Poisoning Among the Cherokees” [use of plants such as mullein to drug and catch fish].  Mid-America Folklore 28 (nos. 1 and 2): 7-11.

Miles, Tiya .  2009.  “‘Circular Reasoning’: Recentering Cherokee Women in the Antiremoval Campaigns” [1817-1830].  American Quarterly 61, no. 2 (June): 221-243.

Miles, Tiya.  2002.  “Uncle Tom Was an Indian: Tracing the Red in Black Slavery.”  Chap. 5 in Confounding the Color Line: The Indian-Black Experience in North America, ed. J. Brooks, 137-160.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Miles, Tiya.  2005.  Ties That Bind: The Story of an Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery and Freedom [19th-century Ga., from 1790; mixed descent].  American Crossroads, no. 14.  Berkeley: University of California Press.  306 pp.

Miles, Tiya.  2008.  “The Narrative of Nancy, A Cherokee Woman” [1801 East Tenn.].  Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies 29, no. 2-3: 59-80.  Held as a slave in Va. since 1778.

Miles, Tiya.  2010.  The House on Diamond Hill: A Cherokee Plantation Story [North Ga., Murray Co.; Cherokee owner; black slaves].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  315 pp.

Minchin, Timothy J.  1998.  “‘Color Means Something’: Black Pioneers, White Resistance, and Interracial Unionism in the Southern Textile Industry, 1957-1980.”  Labor History 39 (May): 109-133.

Minchin, Timothy J.  1999.  “Black Activism, the 1964 Civil Rights Act, and the Racial Integration of the Southern Textile Industry.”  The Journal of Southern History 65 (November): 809-844.

Minchin, Timothy J.  1999.  Hiring the Black Worker: The Racial Integration of the Southern Textile Industry, 1960-1980 [20 tables]. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  342 pp.

Minchin, Timothy J.  2001.  The Color of Work: The Struggle for Civil Rights in the Southern Paper Industry, 1945-1980.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  277 pp.

Minges, Patrick N., ed.  2004.  Black Indian Slave Narratives [27 WPA interviews; Native Americans as slaves and slave owners].  Real Voices, Real History Series.  Winston-Salem, N.C.: John F. Blair.  200 pp.

Mitchell, Anne V.  1997.  “Culture, History, and Development on the Qualla Boundary: The Eastern Cherokees and the Blue Ridge Parkway, 1935-40.”  Appalachian Journal 24 (Winter): 144-191.

Modisett, Cara Ellen.  2008.  “Diaspora Is Here: Sisters of the Circle Give Young Refugee Women a Voice” [Roanoke, Va.].  Pluck: The Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture, no. 3: 17-20.  Joint program with the city’s performing arts, schools, and immigrant services.

Moffatt, Frederick C.  2009.  The Life, Art, and Times of Joseph Delaney, 1904-1991.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  305 pp.  African-American artist from Knoxville; artist-in-residence at University of Tennessee, 1986-1991.

Mohl, Raymond A.  2008.  “Globalization, Latinization, and the Nuevo New South” [tables; 2000 Census].  In Other Souths: Diversity and Difference in the U.S. South, Reconstruction to Present, ed. P. Holloway, 408-442.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  Originally published in Globalization and the American South, ed. J. Cobb and W. Stueck, University of Georgia Press, 2003.

Mohl, Raymond A.  2009.  “Latinos and Blacks in the Recent American South” [table; 12 states].  Chap. 4 in Migration and the Transformation of the Southern Workplace Since 1945, ed. R. Cassanello and C. Davis, 80-113.  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.

Monteith, Carmaleta L.  1998.  “Doctors, Lawyers, Indian Chiefs: Indian Identity in the South” [tribal identity “commodified”].  In Cultural Diversity in the U.S. South: Anthropological Contributions to a Region in Transition, ed. C. Hill and P. Beaver, 69-81.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 31.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Montgomery, Michael, and Cherel Henderson.  2004.  “Eighteenth-Century Emigrants from Ireland to Tennessee: A Report Using First Families of Tennessee Files” [tables].  Journal of East Tennessee History 76: 88-98.

Moore, Ethan.  2011.  “From Sikwa to Swine: The Hog in Cherokee Culture and Society, 1750-1840.”  Native South 4: 105-120.  From purposeless and uneatable to a primary trade material and food.

Moore, MariJo.  1994.  Returning to the Homeland: Cherokee Poetry and Short Stories. Foreword by John Ehle.  Asheville, N.C.: WorldComm.  111 pp.

Moore, MariJo.  1995.  Spirit Voices of Bones: Poetry [Cherokee].  Asheville, N.C.: Renegade Planets.  96 pp.

Morris, Michael.  2005.  “Emerging Gender Roles for Southeastern Indian Women: The Mary Musgrove Story Reconsidered” [Creek; early 1700s].  Georgia Historical Quarterly 89, no. 1 (Spring):1-24.

Morris, Michael.  2007.  “Georgia and the Conversation over Indian Removal” [1830s].  Georgia Historical Quarterly 91, no. 4 (Winter): 403-423.

Moser, Barry.  2002.  “Across the Street and up the Hill” [personal essay; 1950s segregated Chattanooga].  Sewanee Review 110 (Winter): 44-55.

Mosley, Jennifer.  2011.  “Surviving the Tough Times in Decota” [Cabin Creek, Kanawha Co.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 37, no. 2 (Summer): 48-53.  Black family, the Criders; coal company town; 1950s-1960s; Jim Crow laws and forced segregation.

Mould, Tom.  2003.  Choctaw Prophecy: A Legacy of the Future [Miss.].  Contemporary American Indian Studies.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  263 pp.

Moxley, Tonia.  2003.  “Appalachian Colors: Revolutionary Scholarship is Changing the Way We Look at Race and Class in the Mountains” [Wilma Dunaway].  Southern Exposure 31 (Spring): 38-41.

Moxley, Tonia.  2003.  “Remembering the Saltville Massacre” [1864 Va.; 40 black soldiers].  Southern Exposure 31, no. 3-4 (Winter 2003/2004): 34-37.

Moyer, Paul.  2005.  “‘Real’ Indians, ‘White’ Indians, and the Contest for the Wyoming Valley” [1750s-1780s].  In Friends and Enemies in Penn’s Woods: Indians, Colonists, and the Racial Construction of Pennsylvania, ed. W. Pencak and D. Richter, 221-237.  University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.

Myadze, Theresa I.  2006.  “The Status of African Americans and Other Blacks in Urban Areas of Appalachian and Non-Appalachian Alabama” [Birmingham, Hunstville; Montgomery, Mobile].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 12, no. 2 (Fall): 36-54.

Najar, Monica.  2005.  “‘Meddling with Emancipation’: Baptists, Authority, and the Rift over Slavery in the Upper South” [1790s-1808 Ky.].  Journal of the Early Republic 25, no. 2 (Summer): 157-186.

Nash, Steven E.  2006.  “Aiding the Southern Mountain Republicans: The Freedmen’s Bureau in Buncombe County” [1865-70].  North Carolina Historical Review 83, no. 1 (January): 1-30.

Naylor, Celia E.  2008.  African Cherokees in Indian Territory: From Chattel to Citizens.  The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  360 pp.

Naylor-Ojurongbe, Celia E.  2002.  “‘Born and Raised among These People, I Don’t Want to Know Any Other’: Slaves’ Acculturation in Nineteenth-Century Indian Territory.”  Chap. 6 in Confounding the Color Line: The Indian-Black Experience in North America, ed. J. Brooks, 161-191.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Neely, Sharlotte.  1995.  The Role of Christianity in the Snowbird Cherokee Community.  In Religion in the Contemporary South: Diversity, Community, and Identity,  ed. O.K. White, Jr., and D. White.  Pp. 46-55.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 28.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Neely, Sharlotte.  1998.  “Tradition and Change in the World of Cherokee Women.”  Georgia Historical Quarterly 82 (Winter): 848-855.  Review essay of Cherokee Women: Gender and Culture Change, 1700-1835, by Theda Perdue (University of Nebraska Press, 1998).

Nelson, Bruce.  1997.  “‘CIO Meant One Thing for the Whites and Another Thing for Us’: Steelworkers and Civil Rights, 1936-1974.”  In Southern Labor in Transition, 1940-1995, ed. R. Zieger, 113-145.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Neville, Gwen Kennedy.  1998.  “Cultures and Communities in the New Old South: White Anglo-Saxon Protestants” [immigrant diversity].  In Cultural Diversity in the U.S. South: Anthropological Contributions to a Region in Transition, ed. C. Hill and P. Beaver, 82-92.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 31.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Newberry, Beth.  2008.  “Hola Y’all: Latinos Speak from Affrilachia.”  Pluck: The Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture, no. 3: 39-48.  Four writers explore shared stories.

Newberry, Beth.  2008.  “Of These Hills: Appalachian Heritage’s African-Americans in Appalachia Issue.  Pluck: The Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture, no. 4: 41-42, plus bibliography of African-American Appalachian books, 44-48.  Overview of special issue of Appalachian Heritage, vol. 36, no. 3, Summer 2008.  Interview with George Brosi, editor, and Chad Berry, Director of the Appalachian Center at Berea College.

Newberry, Elizabeth.  2000.  “Poets Turned Prophets: Affrilachian Poets Claim the Space Between Two Worlds.”  Sojourners 29 (September/October): 50-51, 53.

Nicholas, Mark A.  2006.  “Practicing Local Faith & Local Politics: Senecas, Presbyterianism, and a ‘New Indian Mission History’” [Allegany Reservation, Cattaraugus Co., N.Y.].  Pennsylvania History 73, no. 1 (Winter): 69-101.

Nichols, David Andrew.  2008.  Red Gentlemen & White Savages: Indians, Federalists, and the Search for Order on the American Frontier [1780s-1790s].  Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.  291 pp.

Noe, Kenneth W.  2001.  “‘A Source of Great Economy’?  The Railroad and Slavery’s Expansion in Southwest Virginia, 1850-1860.”  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 101-115.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Previously published as chapter 4 in Kenneth W. Noe, Southwest Virginia’s Railroad, Urbana: Univ. of Illinois Press, 1994.

Nolt, Steven M.  2002.  Foreigners in Their Own Land: Pennsylvania Germans in the Early Republic.  University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.  238 pp.

Norgren, Jill.  [1996] 2004.  The Cherokee Cases: Two Landmark Federal Decisions in the Fight for Sovereignty [1830s].  Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.  212 pp.  Originally published: New York: McGraw-Hill, as The Cherokee Cases: The Confrontation of Law and Politics.

Norman, Gurney.  2009.  “Affrilachian Genesis” [poet Frank X Walker].  The Iron Mountain Review 25 (Spring): 26-27.

Norrell, Robert J.  2009.  Up from History: The Life of Booker T. Washington [1956-1915].  Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.  508 pp.  Washington spent much of his youth in the Kanawha County, West Virginia coalfields.

Nuevo Appalachia.  2012.  Special issue, Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 28, no. 1 (Summer): 1-60.  Eighteen essays encompass “over 450 years of Hispanic influence in Appalachia.

O’Brien, Greg, ed.  2008.  Pre-Removal Choctaw History: Exploring New Paths.  The Civilization of the American Indian series, v. 255.  Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.  265 pp.

O’Brien, Greg.  2001.  “The Conqueror Meets the Unconquered: Negotiating Cultural Boundaries on the Post-Revolutionary Southern Frontier” [Ango-Choctaw diplomacy; 1785-1786; S.C.].  The Journal of Southern History 67 (February): 39-72.

O’Brien, Greg.  2002.  Choctaws in a Revolutionary Age, 1750-1830.  Indians of the Southeast.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  158 pp.

O’Donnell, James H.  2004.  Ohio’s First Peoples [Adena and Hopewell, Wyandots (1840 removal), Shawnee, and Delaware].  Ohio Bicentennial Series.  Athens: Ohio University Press.  176 pp.

O’Donnell, Kevin.  2004.  “The Artist in the Garden: George Cooke and the Ideology of Fine Arts Painting in Antebellum Georgia” [Cooke’s ignorance and portrayal of Cherokees following 1838 Removal].  In CrossRoads: A Southern Culture Annual, ed. Ted Olson, 72-96.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.

O’Sullivan, Meg Devlin.  2005.  “A Family Affair: Cherokee Conversion to American Board Churches, 1817-1839” [missions map].  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 64, no. 4 (Winter): 264-283.

Oakley, Christopher Arris.  2001.  “Indian Gaming and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians” [casinos].  North Carolina Historical Review 78 (April): 133-155.

Oakley, Christopher Arris.  2008.  “The Native South in the Post–World War II Era.”  Native South 1: 61-79.

Oatis, Steven J.  2004.  A Colonial Complex: South Carolina’s Frontiers in the Era of the Yamasee War, 1680-1730 [Creek, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Catawba, Shawnee].  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  399 pp.

Odem, Mary E.  2008.  “Unsettled in the Suburbs: Latino Immigration and Ethnic Diversity in Metro Atlanta.”  Chap. 5 in  Twenty-First-Century Gateways: Immigrant Incorporation in Suburban America, ed. A. Singer, S. Hardwick, and C. Brettell, 105-136.  Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution Press.

Odem, Mary E., and Elaine Cantrell Lacy, ed.  2009.  Latino Immigrants and the Transformation of the U.S. South.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  175 pp.  Contents: Introduction / Mary E. Odem and Elaine Lacy -- Cultural Enclaves and Transnational Ties: Mexican Immigration and Settlement in South Carolina / Elaine Lacy -- New Scenarios of Migration: Social Vulnerability of Undocumented Veracruzanos in the Southern United States / Rosio Cordova Plaza -- The Dalton Story: Mexican Immigration and Social Transformation in the Carpet Capital of the World / Victor Zuniga and Ruben Hernandez-Leon -- Globalization and Latin American Immigration in Alabama / Raymond A. Mohl -- Hispanic Newcomers to North Carolina: Demographic Characteristics and Economic Impact / James H. Johnson Jr. and John D. Kasarda -- Race, Migration, and Labor Control: Neoliberal Challenges to Organizing Mississippi’s Poultry Workers / Angela C. Stuesse -- Latino Immigrants and the Politics of Space in Atlanta / Mary E. Odem -- New Americans in a New South City? Immigrant and Refugee Politics in Nashville, Tennessee / Jamie Winders -- Popular Attitudes and Public Policies: Southern Responses to Latino Immigration / Elaine Lacy and Mary E. Odem.

Oliphant, John.  2000.  Peace and War on the Anglo-Cherokee Frontier, 1756-63.  Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press.  272 pp.

Osborne, Christopher M.  2005.  “Invisible Hands: Slaves, Bound Laborers, and the Development of Western Pennsylvania, 1780-1820” [tables].  Pennsylvania History 72, no. 1 (Winter): 77-99.

Osborne, Guy Larry.  2004.  “Fighting Racism in Appalachia: A Progress Report from the Grassroots” [social change organizations].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 10 (Spring/Fall): 143-151.

Ostwalt, Conrad, and Phoebe Pollitt.  2001.  “The Salem School and Orphanage: White Missionaries, Black School” [N.C.].  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 235-244.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Previously published under a different title in Appalachian Journal 20 (1993): 265-275.

Oswalt, Wendell H.  2006.  “The Eastern Cherokee: Farmers of the Southeast.”  Chap. 13 in This Land Was Theirs: A Study of Native North Americans, 419-446.  8th ed.  New York: Oxford University Press.

Oswalt, Wendell H.  2006.  “The Eastern Cherokee: Farmers of the Southeast.”  Chap. 13 in This Land Was Theirs: A Study of Native North Americans, 8th ed., 419-446.  New York: Oxford University Press.

Out of This Kitchen: A History of the Ethnic Groups and Their Foods in the Steel Valley [Homestead, Pa.].  2010.  2nd ed.  Pittsburgh: Publassist. 186 pp.  Contents (recipes with local history essays): Germans, Scotch-Irish and Irish, Russians, Hungarians, Molasses, World War I, African-Americans, Ukranians, The Depression Years, Macedonians, Bulgarians, Slovaks, World War II, Italians, Poles, Jews, Post-World War II.

Owen, Christopher H.  1994.  “‘To Refrain From ... Political Affairs’: Southern Evangelicals, Cherokee Missions, and the Spirituality of the Church.”  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 53 (Spring): 20-29.

Owen, Narcissa.  2005.  A Cherokee Woman’s America: Memoirs of Narcissa Owen, 1831-1907.  Edited by Karen L. Kilcup.  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.  189 pp.

Owens, Sadie.  2001. “Through Sadie’s Eyes: An Interview with Sadie Owens” [1940s? Rabun Co., Ga.; African American].  Interview by students Corley Brown and Joni Ramey.  Foxfire Magazine 35 (Fall/Winter): 98-107.

Owings, Alison.  2011.  “Elders of the Haudenosaunee: Darwin Hill (Tonawanda Seneca) and Geraldine Green (Cattaraugus Seneca)” [contemporary; western N.Y.].  Chap. 4 in Indian Voices: Listening to Native Americans, by A. Owings, 62-91.  New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press.

Owle, Freeman.  2007.  “Literature, Education, and The Return of the Whippoorwill: A Conversation with Freeman Owle” [Cherokee storyteller and carver; 1950s-60s on the Qualla reservation; book-in-progress].  Interview by Christopher Teuton.  Appalachian Journal 34, no. 2 (Winter): 194-205.

Paige, Amanda L., Fuller L. Bumpers, and Daniel F. Littlefield.  2010.  Chickasaw Removal [1837].  Ada, Okla.: Chickasaw Press.  311 pp.  From northern Miss. to Indian Territory.

Parker, G. Keith.  2006.  Seven Cherokee Myths: Creation, Fire, the Primordial Parents, the Nature of Evil, the Family, Universal Suffering and Communal Obligation.  Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland.  206 pp.

Payne, Elizabeth Anne, et al.  2010.  “The Unknown Grandmother, African American Memory, and Lives of Service in Northern Mississippi.”  In Mississippi Women: Their Histories, Their Lives, ed., M. Swain, E. Anne Payne, and M. Spruill, 313-332.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Peacock, James L., Harry L. Watson, and Carrie R. Matthews, ed.  2005.  The American South in a Global World [19 essays, many addressing Latino immigrants and N.C.].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  299 pp.

Pearson, Barry Lee.  2003.  “Appalachian Blues” [history, geography, styles].  Black Music Research Journal 23, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 23-51.

Pearson, Brooks C.  1997.  “18th and 19th Century Welsh Migration to the United States.”  Pennsylvania Geographer 35 (Spring): 38-54.

Perdue, Theda, and Michael D. Green.  2005.  The Cherokee Removal: A Brief History with Documents.  2nd ed.  Bedford Series in History and Culture.  Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s.  198 pp.

Perdue, Theda, and Michael D. Green.  2007.  The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears [1838-1839].  The Penguin Library of American Indian History.  New York: Viking.  189 pp.

Perdue, Theda, and Michael D. Green.  2001.  The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southeast.  The Columbia Guides to American Indian History and Culture.  New York: Columbia University Press.  325 pp.

Perdue, Theda, ed.  1995.  The Cherokee Removal: A Brief History With Documents.  Introduction by Michael D. Green.  Bedford Series in History & Culture.  Boston: St. Martin’s Press.  185 pp.

Perdue, Theda.  1998. Cherokee Women: Gender and Culture Change, 1700-1835. Indians of the Southeast.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  253 p.

Perdue, Theda.  2002.  “The Trail of Tears: Removal of the Southern Indians in the Jeffersonian-Jacksonian Era.”  In “They Made Us Many Promises”: The American  Indian Experience, 1524 to the Present, ed. P. Weeks, 67-84.  Wheeling, Ill.: Harlan Davidson.

Perdue, Theda.  2003.  “Mixed Blood” Indians: Racial Construction in the Early South.  Mercer University Lamar Memorial Lectures, no. 45.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  135 pp.

Perdue, Theda.  2004.  “Race and Culture: Writing the Ethnohistory of the Early South” [mixed-bloods, whites and Indians: ancestry, political implications].  Ethnohistory 51, no. 4 (Fall): 701-723.

Perdue, Theda.  2005.  “George Washington and the ‘Civilization’ of the Southern Indians” [Cherokee].  Chap. 12 in George Washington’s South, ed. T. Harvey and G. O’Brien, 313-325.  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.

Perdue, Theda.  2007.  “American Indian Survival in South Carolina” [1600s to present; map of nineteen tribes and groups incl. Cherokee, Santee, and Catawba].  South Carolina Historical Magazine 108, no. 3 (July): 215-234.

Perdue, Theda.  2008.  “Columbus Meets Pocahontas in the American South.”  In Southern Cultures: The Fifteenth Anniversary Reader, ed. H. Watson and L. Griffin, 211-224.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  European views, and realities, of Native sexuality.

Perdue, Theda.  2012.  “The Legacy of Indian Removal.” Journal Of Southern History 78, no. 1 (February): 3-36.  Jim Crow laws and Native Americans.

Perlman, Robert.  2001.  From Shtetl to Milltown: Litvaks, Hungarians, and Galizianers in Western Pennsylvania, 1875-1925.  Pittsburgh: Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania.  123 pp.

Perlman, Robert.  2001.  From Shtetl to Milltown: Litvaks, Hungarians, and Galizianers in Western Pennsylvania, 1875-1925.  Pittsburgh: Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania.  124 pp.

Peterson, Shane C.  2008.  “Defining Cultural Landscapes through Human Ecology: A Case Study from the 1819 Citizen Cherokee Reservations in Western North Carolina.”  North Carolina Archaeology 56: 96-117.

Phillips, Joyce B., and Paul Gary Phillips, ed.  1998.  The Brainerd Journal: A Mission to the Cherokees, 1817-1823 [Tenn.].  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  584 pp.

Piecuch, Jim.  2008.  Three Peoples, One King: Loyalists, Indians, and Slaves in the Revolutionary South, 1775-1782 [S.C., Ga.; Cherokee].  Columbia: University of South Carolina Press.  439 pp.

Piker, Joshua Aaron.  2003.  “‘White & Clean’ & Contested: Creek Towns and Trading Paths in the Aftermath of the Seven Years’ War” [Upper Creek towns].  Ethnohistory 50 (Spring): 315-347.

Piker, Joshua Aaron.  2004.  Okfuskee: A Creek Indian Town in Colonial America.  Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.  270 pp.

Piker, Joshua.  2004.  “Colonists and Creeks: Rethinking the Pre-Revolutionary Southern Backcountry” [land settlement; Ga., S.C.; map].  Journal of Southern History 70 (August): 503-540.

Pinson, Vera Hennessee.  2001.  “An Early Czech Community in Putnam County”  [autobiography excerpt; 1921 White Co., Tenn.; coal town].  Tennessee Folklore Society Bulletin 60 (no. 1): 25-31.

Pittman, Rickey.  2010.  Stonewall Jackson’s Black Sunday School [children’s book].  Illustrated by Lynn Hosegood.  Gretna, La.: Pelican Publishing.  32 pp.  “In 1855, people of color began attending Sunday school at the Lexington Presbyterian Church in Virginia. Stonewall Jackson himself was the first superintendent of the school.”

Pluck! The Journal of Affrilachian Arts and Culture.  2007–  .  Irregular.  Editor, Frank X Walker.  Lexington: University of Kentucky, Department of English [initially published at Northern Kentucky University].  Poetry, essays, interviews, letters; “...unites the broad spectrum of the African and African American ethos and aesthetic to the Appalachian region.”

Pluckhahn, Thomas J., and Robbie Ethridge, ed.  2006.  Light on the Path: The Anthropology and History of the Southeastern Indians.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  283 pp.  Contents: Introduction / Thomas J. Pluckhahn, et al. -- The nature of Mississippian regional systems / David J. Hally -- Lithics, shellfish, and beavers / Mark Williams and Scott Jones -- The Cussita migration legend: history, ideology, and the politics of mythmaking / Steven C. Hahn -- Coalescent societies / Stephen A. Kowalewski --  “A bold and warlike people”: the basis of Westo power / Eric Bowne -- New light on the Tsali affair / William Martin Jurgelski -- “A sprightly lover is the most prevailing missionary”: intermarriage between Europeans and Indians in the eighteenth-century South / Theda Perdue -- The historic period transformation of Mississippian societies / Adam King -- Bridging prehistory and history in the southeast: evaluating the utility of the acculturation concept / John E. Worth -- Creating the shatter zone: Indian slave traders and the collapse of the southeastern chiefdoms / Robbie Ethridge.

Pocock, Emil.  2006.  “Slavery and Freedom in the Early Republic: Robert Patterson’s Slaves in Kentucky and Ohio, 1804-1819.”  Ohio Valley History 6, no. 1 (Spring): 3-26.

Podber, Jacob J.  2007.  The Electronic Front Porch: An Oral History of the Arrival of Modern Media in Rural Appalachia and the Melungeon Community [86 informants; impact of radio, television, and the Internet].  The Melungeons series.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  166 pp.

Policing the Police [feature: police brutality].  2000.  “CPR for a Troubled City” [Knoxville, Tenn.], by Rick Held, 17-19; “No Justice; Disturbing the Peace” [Chattanooga, Tenn.], by Jordan Green, 20-22.  Southern Exposure 28 (Spring/Summer): 17-22.

Pollard, Kelvin M.  2004.  “A ‘New Diversity’: Race and Ethnicity in the Appalachian Region” [tables; 1990, 2000 census data].  Demographic and Socioeconomic Change in Appalachia series. Washington, D.C.: Appalachian Regional Commission, Online Resource Center.  42 pp. 

http://www.arc.gov/research/researchreportdetails.asp?REPORT_ID=34.

Pollitzer, William S.  [1971] 2005.  “Physical Anthropology of Indians of the Old South” [states; “Negro admixture”].  In Culture, Ethnicity, and Justice in the South: The Southern Anthropological Society, 1968-1971, 485-497.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  (Reprint, from Proceedings No. 5.  Red, White, and Black: Symposium on Indians in the Old South, ed. C.  Hudson, 31-43).

Potter, Chris.  2001.  “You Had to Ask” [Pittsburgh’s Chinatown, short history].  Western Pennsylvania History 84 (Fall): 48.

Power, Susan C.  2004.  Early Art of the Southeastern Indians: Feathered Serpents & Winged Beings [Ch. 2: Adena and Hopewell].  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  254 pp.

Power, Susan C.  2007.  Art of the Cherokee: Prehistory to the Present.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  295 pp.

Preisler, Julian H.  2010.  Jewish West Virginia [photo retrospective, to 1849].  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  127 pp.  Arranged geographically around seven areas or cities.

Preston, David L.  2005.  “Squatters, Indians, Proprietary Government, and Land in the Susquehanna Valley” [mid-eighteenth century].  In Friends and Enemies in Penn’s Woods: Indians, Colonists, and the Racial Construction of Pennsylvania, ed. W. Pencak and D. Richter, 180-200.  University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.

Preston, David L.  2009.  The Texture of Contact: European and Indian Settler Communities on the Frontiers of Iroquoia, 1667-1783.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  395 pp. Contents: The tree of peace planted: Iroquois and French-Canadian communities in the St. Lawrence Valley -- Iroquois communities in the eighteenth-century Mohawk Valley: Schoharie, Tiononderoge, and Canajoharie -- Dispossessing the Indians: proprietors, squatters, and natives in the Susquehanna Valley -- “The storm which had been so long gathering”: Pennsylvanians and Indians at war -- “Our neighbourhood with the settlers”: Iroquois and German communities in the Seven Years’ War -- Imperial crisis in the Ohio Valley: Indian, colonial American, and British military communities -- Epilogue: the tree of peace uprooted.

Prins, Esther, and Blaire Willson Toso.  2012.  “Receptivity toward Immigrants in Rural Pennsylvania: Perceptions of Adult English as Second Language Providers.”  Rural Sociology 77, no. 3 (September): 435-461.  Tables; 22 study counties.

Puckett, Anita.  2001.  “The Melungeon Identity Movement and the Construction of Appalachian Whiteness.”  Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 11 (June): 131-146.

Puckett, Anita.  2006.  “Melungeons.”  In The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, Vol. 6: Ethnicity, ed. C. Ray, 185-187.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Purcell, Aaron D.  2006.  “‘A Damned Piece of Rascality’: The Business of Slave Trading in Southern Appalachia.”  Journal of East Tennessee History 78: 1-22.  Abingdon, Va., lawyers Joseph Meek and Samuel Logan profit from slave-buying in Appalachian Va. and Tenn.

Ramsey, William L.  2008.  The Yamasee War: A Study of Culture, Economy, and Conflict in the Colonial South [1715-1716].  Indians of the Southeast series.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  307 pp.  Carolinians; slavery issue.

Ray, Celeste, ed.  2007.  Ethnicity, Vol. 6 of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  276 pp.  Describes 100 ethnic groups, incl. “Southern Appalachian and Mountain People,” “Appalachian African Americans,” “Cherokees, Eastern Band,” “Latinos,” “Melungeons”.

Ray, Celeste.  2001.  Highland Heritage: Scottish Americans in the American South.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  256 pp.

Ray, Celeste.  2003.  “‘Thigibh!’ Means ‘Y’all Come!’: Renegotiating Regional Memories through Scottish Heritage Celebration” [Grandfather Mountain, N.C., and elsewhere].  In Southern Heritage on Display: Public Ritual and Ethnic Diversity within Southern Regionalism, ed. Celeste Ray, 251-282. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.

Ray, Celeste.  2006.  “Southern Appalachia and Mountain People.”  In The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, Vol. 6: Ethnicity, ed. C. Ray, 82-89.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Ray, Celeste.  2008.  “Scottish Heritage, Southern Style.”  In Southern Crossroads: Perspectives on Religion and Culture, ed. W. Conser, and R. Payne, 231-248.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Ray, Kristofer.  2010.  “New Directions in Early Tennessee History, 1540-1815.”  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 69, no. 3 (Fall): 204-223.  Relations between Native Americans and settlers; Native American slave trade; Cherokee.

Reed, Betty Jamerson.  2004.  The Brevard Rosenwald School: Black Education and Community Building in a Southern Appalachian Town, 1920-1966  [Transylvania Co., N.C.].  Contributions to Southern Appalachian Studies, no 11.  Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland.  235 pp.

Reed, Betty Jamerson.  2011.  School Segregation in Western North Carolina: A History, 1860s-1970s.  Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland.  264 pp.

Reed, John Shelton. 1997. “Mixing in the Mountains” [multi-racial Melungeons].  Southern Cultures 3 (Winter): 25-36.

Reed, John Shelton.  1997.  “The Cherokee Princess in the Family Tree” [ancestry poll].  Southern Cultures 3 (no. 1): 111-113.

Reed, John Shelton.  2003.  “Mixing in the Mountains” [Melungeons].  In Minding the South, 253-262.  Columbia: University of Missouri Press.  291 pp.

Rees, Martha W.  2001.  “How Many Are There?  Ethnographic Estimates of Mexican Women in Atlanta, Georgia.”  In Latino Workers in the Contemporary South, ed. A. D. Murphy, C. Blanchard, and J. A. Hill, 36-43.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 34.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Reynolds, Kevin.  2011.  Native North Carolina: The What, Why and Where of Native American Place Names.  Boone, N.C.: Parkway Publishers.  122 pp.  Contents: Rivers, mountains, lakes, and such -- Communities, towns, and cities -- Counties -- Travel guide -- Appendix: interesting American place names.

Rice, Connie L.  1996.  “The ‘Separate but Equal’ Schools of Monongalia County’s Coal Mining Communities” [W.Va.].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 2 (Fall): 323-335.

Rice, Connie Park.  1999.  Our Monongalia: A History of African Americans in Monongalia County, West Virginia.  Terra Alta, W.Va.: Headline Books.  271 pp.

Rice, Connie Park.  2007.  “‘Don’t Flinch nor Yield an Inch’: J. R. Clifford and the Struggle for Equal Rights in West Virginia” [state’s first black attorney, 1887].  West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, new series, vol. 1, no. 2 (Fall): 45-68.

Rice, Connie Park.  2009.  “Separate But Never Equal: Dewey W. Fox and the Struggle for Black Equality in the Age of Jim Crow.”  In Culture, Class, and Politics in Modern Appalachia: Essays in Honor of Ronald L. Lewis, ed. J. Egolf, K. Fones-Wolf, and L. Martin, 118-137.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.  Black educator; 1920s-30s Scott’s Run coalfield community, Monongalia Co., W.Va.

Rich, Brian L., and Marta Miranda.  2005.  “The Sociopolitical Dynamics of Mexican Immigration in Lexington, Kentucky, 1997 to 2002: An Ambivalent Community Responds” [tables].  In New Destinations: Mexican Immigration in the United States, ed. V. Zuniga and R. Hernandez-Leon, 187-219.  New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

Richardson, Darlene.  2002.  “Restructuring a Community with Oral History” [African American communities in Vinton, adjacent Roanoke, Va.].  Oral History Review 29 (Summer/Fall): 97-102.

Richter, Daniel K.  2005.  Native Americans’ Pennsylvania [origins to present].  University Park: Pennsylvania Historical Association.  Pennsylvania History Studies, no. 28.  100 pp.

Riggs, Brett H., R. P. Stephen Davis, Jr., and Mark R. Plane.  2006.  “Catawba Pottery in the Post-Revolutionary Era: A View from the Source.”  North Carolina Archaeology 55: 60-88.

Riggs, Brett.  1997.  “The Christie Cabin Site: Historical and Archaeological Evidence of the Life and Times of a Cherokee ‘Metis’ Household (1835-1838).”  In May We All Remember Well: A Journal of the History & Cultures of Western North Carolina, Vol. 1, ed. R. S. Brunk, 228-248.  Asheville, N.C.: Robert S. Brunk Auction Services Inc.

Riggs, Brett.  2002.  “In the Service of Native Interests: Archaeology for, of, and by Cherokee People” [Macon Co., N.C.; repatriation; Kituwha].  In Southern Indians and Anthropologists: Culture, Politics, and Identity, ed. L. Lefler and F. Gleach, 19-30.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 35.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Robert J. Conley [Featured Author].  2009.  Special “Cherokee” issue, Appalachian Heritage 37, no. 4 (Fall): 11-24.  This special issue also features writing and art of many other members of the Eastern Band of the Cherokees.

Robinson, Mary, and Fran Leeper Buss.  2009.  Moisture of the Earth: Mary Robinson, Civil Rights and Textile Union Activist: An Oral History.  Compiled and edited by Fran Leeper Buss [from 23 years of interviews].  Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.  222 pp.  Race, class, and gender issues; J.P. Stevens’s Montgomery, Ala., plant.

Robinson, Sherry.  2003.  “Marilou Awiakta on Environment, Culture, and Community: A Native Perspective.”  Journal of Kentucky Studies 20 (September): 123-129.

Rodning, Christopher B.  2002.  “Reconstructing the Coalescence of Cherokee Communities in Southern Appalachia.”  In The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, 1540-1760, ed. R. Ethridge and C. Hudson, 155-175.  Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.

Rodning, Christopher B.  2010.  “European Trade Goods at Cherokee Settlements in Southwestern North Carolina” [Coweeta Creek; 17th century].  North Carolina Archaeology 59 (October): 1-84.

Rogoff, Leonard.  2010.  Down Home: Jewish Life in North Carolina [1585-2009].  Chapel Hill: Published in association with the Jewish Heritage Foundation of North Carolina by the University of North Carolina Press.  422 pp.

Rohrer, S. Scott.  2002.  “Searching for Land and God: The Pietist Migration to North Carolina in the Late Colonial Period” [Moravian Church; from Germany to Wachovia community (Forsyth Co.)].  North Carolina Historical Review 79 (October): 409-439.

Roinila, Mika.  2003.  “From Monessen to Clarksburg and Beyond: The Finnish Ethnicity in Central Appalachia” [Pa. to W.Va., 1910-1990].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 9 (Spring): 49-67.

Romain, William F.  2000.  Mysteries of the Hopewell: Astronomers, Geometers, and Magicians of the Eastern Woodlands.  Series on Ohio Culture and History.  Akron, Ohio: University of Akron Press.  272 pp.

Ronda, James P.  2002.  “‘We Have a Country’: Race, Geography, and the Invention of Indian Territory.”  In Race and the Early Republic: Racial Consciousness and Nation-Building in the Early Republic, ed. M. Morrison and J. Stewart, 159-176.  Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield.  Originally published in Journal of the Early Republic 19 (Winter 1999): 739-755.

Rozema, Vicki, ed.  2002.  Cherokee Voices: Early Accounts of Cherokee Life in the East.  Winston-Salem, N.C.: John F. Blair.  180 pp.

Rozema, Vicki, ed.  2003.  Voices from the Trail of Tears [first person accounts; 1838].  Real Voices, Real History Series.  Winston-Salem, N.C.: John F. Blair.  176 pp.

Rozema, Vicki.  1995.  Footsteps of the Cherokees: A Guide to the Eastern Homelands of the Cherokee Nation.  Winston-Salem: John F. Blair.  396 pp.

Ruberto, Leonilde Frieri.  2010.  Such Is Life = Ma la Vita e Fatta Cosi.  Translated by Laura E. Ruberto.  New York: Bordighera Press.  97 pp.  Memoir of Leonilde Ruberto (1913-2000) who completed the fourth grade, raised a family, then emigrated in 1954 from southern Italy to Pittsburgh.

Rucker, James “Sparky.”  2008.  “The Preacher’s in the Pulpit: Old-Time African-American Preacher Tales.”  Appalachian Heritage 36, no. 3 (Summer): 87-91.  Special issue–“African-American Appalachia.”

Sadosky, Leonard J.  2009.  Revolutionary Negotiations: Indians, Empires, and Diplomats in the Founding of America.  Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.  275 pp.

Salafia, Matthew.  2008.  “Searching for Slavery: Fugitive Slaves in the Ohio River Valley Borderland, 1830-1860.”  Ohio Valley History 8, no. 4 (Winter): 38-63.

Salaita, Steven.  2001.  “Borderlands, Homelands and Flatlands” [reflections of a West Virginian Arab-American].  Appalachian Heritage 29 (Winter): 8-15.

Sanders, Randy.  2012.  “A New Frontier” [Buncombe Co., N.C.; Hispanic immigration].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 28, no. 1 (Summer): 17-19.  A look at “the attitudes that both contributed to and resulted from one of the area’s largest immigration raids,” November 2011, at Asheville’s Shogun Buffet Hibachi Grill & Sushi, and activists’ founding of the co-op, Las Tres Fronteras.

Sauceman, Fred.  2009.  “Nourishing Miners and Dodging the USDA: West Virginia’s Pepperoni Roll Links Italy and Appalachia.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 25, no.1 (Spring/Summer): 49-52.

Sauceman, Fred.  2012.  “Fuad.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 28, no. 1 (Summer): 29-31.  Fuad Reveiz, a Columbian immigrant, went on to become one of University of Tennessee’s most renowned football players.  Sidebar: “Netting New Opportunities,” by Joe Smith, profiles Reveiz in his role as current-day president of the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of East Tennessee, 30-32.

Sauceman, Fred.  2012.  “Mesoamerican Kitchen Tools Find a New Use in East Tennessee” [Molcajetes Mexican Grill, Kingsport, Tenn.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 28, no. 1 (Summer): 45-46.  Sidebars: “A Latin Riff on Ramps” [W.Va. ramp salsa], by Fred Sauceman, and “Cervantes Tamales” [recipe; Lebanon, Va.], by Aaron Owens, 47.

Saunt, Claudio.  2004.  “The Paradox of Freedom: Tribal Sovereignty and Emancipation during the Reconstruction of Indian Territory” [slaveholding among Southeastern tribes].  Journal of Southern History 70 (February): 63-94.

Saunt, Claudio.  2005.  Black, White, and Indian: Race and the Unmaking of an American Family [Creek Indians; racial identity: African American-Creek; Grayson family].  New York: Oxford University Press.  300 pp.

Saunt, Claudio.  2008.  “The Native South: An Account of Recent Historiography.”  Native South 1: 45-60.

Scancarelli, Janine, and Heather K. Hardy, ed.  2005.  Native Languages of the Southeastern United States [Alabama Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Caddo, Cherokee, Natchez, and Quapaw].  Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press in cooperation with the American Indian Studies Research Institute, Indiana University, Bloomington.  556 pp.

Schein, Anna M., ed.  2005.  White Pine Spirit of Peace: The WVU Peace Tree, A West Virginia University Historic Tree [planting ceremony: 1992, address by Chief Leon Shenandoah; and 1996, address by Chief Jake Swamp].  Morgantown, W.Va.: Office of the Provost, West Virginia University.  82 pp.

Schrift, Melissa.  2003.  “Melungeons and the Politics of Heritage” [settlement areas map].  In Southern Heritage on Display: Public Ritual and Ethnic Diversity within Southern Regionalism, ed. Celeste Ray, 106-129. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.

Schulte, Brigid.  2007.  “Trail Exposes Hidden History of Va. Indians: Endeavor Aims to Refocus Perceptions, Studies of Tribal Cultures.” [Monacan Nation, 1607-2007].  Washington Post, 23 June, 1(B).  1268 words.

Schumann, William.  2010.  “Locating Wales in Appalachian Scholarship.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 16, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 9-25.  “...illuminates why Welsh American identities in Appalachia were not as pronounced or long-lasting as those of Scottish and Irish Americans.”

Schutt, Amy C.  2007.  Peoples of the River Valleys: The Odyssey of the Delaware Indians.  Early American Studies.  Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.  250 pp.

Scolnick, Joseph M., Jr., and N. Brent Kennedy.  2003.  From Anatolia to Appalachia: A Turkish-American Dialogue [interviews; sources; DNA study].  The Melungeons: History, Culture, Ethnicity, & Literature, no. 4.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  130 pp.

Scott, Michelle R.  2008.  Blues Empress in Black Chattanooga: Bessie Smith and the Emerging Urban South [Tenn.].  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.  198 pp.  Southern black urbanism; role of music; late 19th-century.

Scott, Rebecca R.  2009.  “Appalachia and the Construction of Whiteness in the United States” [hillbillies].  Sociology Compass 3, no. 5 (September): 803-810.

Shadburn, Don L., and John D. Strange.  2012.  Upon Our Ruins: A Study in Cherokee History and Genealogy.  Pioneer-Cherokee Heritage Series, no. 7.  Cumming, Ga.: Cottonpatch Press.  766 pp.

Shaughnessy, Michael R.  2007.  German Pittsburgh [photo-retrospective]. Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  127 pp.  Nineteenth and early twentieth-centuries.

Sheidley, Nathaniel.  1999.  “Hunting and the Politics of Masculinity in Cherokee Treaty-Making, 1763-75.  In Empire and Others: British Encounters with Indigenous Peoples, 1600-1850, ed. M. Daunton, R. Halpern, 167-185.  Critical Histories series. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Sheskin, Ira M.  2006.  “The Dixie Diaspora: The ‘Loss’ of the Small Southern Jewish Community.”  In Dixie Diaspora: An Anthology of Southern Jewish History, ed. M. Bauman, 165-188.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.

Shevitz, Amy Hill.  2003.  “‘Richest and Best / Is the Wine of the West’: The Ohio River Valley and the Jewish Frontier.”  Ohio History 112 (Winter-Spring): 4-18.  http://publications.ohiohistory.org/ohstemplate.cfm?action=toc&vol=112.

Shevitz, Amy Hill.  2007.  Jewish Communities on the Ohio River: A History [24 towns; population tables].  Ohio River Valley series.  Lexington, Ky.: University Press of Kentucky.  266 pp.

Shultz, Benjamin J.  2008.  “Inside the Gilded Cage: The Lives of Latino Immigrant Males in Rural Central Kentucky” [shaded county outline maps; tables].  Southeastern Geographer 48, no. 2 (August): 201-218.

Shurbutt, S. Bailey.  2005.  “Where Mountain Meets Atom, Within the Healing Circle: The Writing of Marilou Awiakta” [ecocritical].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 11, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 195-204.

Silber, Nina.  2001.  “‘What Does America Need So Much as Americans?’ Race and Northern Reconciliation with Southern Appalachia, 1870-1900” [outsider-mythologized, racially-pure, Anglo-Saxon Appalachia].  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 245-258.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Simi, Pete, and Robert Futrell.  2010.  American Swastika: Inside the White Power Movement’s Hidden Spaces of Hate.  Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield.  167 pp.  Case studies of white supremacy movement and organizations, including National Alliance, Hillsboro, W.Va.

Simmons, J. Susanne, and Nancy T. Sorrells.  2000.  “Slave Hire and the Development of Slavery in Augusta County, Virginia.”  In After the Backcountry: Rural Life in the Great Valley of Virginia, 1800-1900, ed. K. Koons and W. Hofstra, 169-184. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Simms, William Gilmore.  2003.  An Early and Strong Sympathy: The Indian Writings of William Gilmore Simms [essays and letters, stories, poems].  Edited by John Caldwell Guilds and Charles Hudson.  Columbia: University of South Carolina Press for the South Caroliniana Library with the assistance of the Caroline McKissick Dial Publication Fund and the University Caroliniana Society.  604 pp.

Slater, Robert Glenn.  2009.  “A Distinctive Minority: The Black Leaders of Blount County, Tennessee During Reconstruction.”  Journal of East Tennessee History 81: 19-41.

Smith, Barbara Ellen.  2004.  “De-Gradations of Whiteness: Appalachia and the Complexities of Race.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 10 (Spring/Fall): 38-57.

Smith, Barbara Ellen.  2012.  “The Price of the Ticket: Latino Immigrants and the Challenge of Community in Appalachia.”  Appalachian Journal 39, no. 3-4 (Spring/Summer): 234-244.

Smith, Bill.  2007.  “Bill Smith: Taking the Heat—and Dishing It Out—in a Nuevo New South Kitchen” [Chapel Hill restaurant; Mexican employees].  Interview by Lisa Eveleigh.  Southern Cultures 13, no. 4 (Winter): 59-75.

Smith, Chadwick Corntassel, and Rennard Strickland, with Benny Smith.  2010.  Building One Fire: Art + World View in Cherokee Life.  Tahlequah, Okla.: Cherokee Nation.  224 pp.  Photos of 200 works by 80 artists.

Smith, Daniel Blake.  2011.  An American Betrayal: Cherokee Patriots and the Trail of Tears [1838-39].  New York: Henry Holt.  321 pp.  Contents: Becoming “civilized” | Outrage in Cornwall | Removal | The “white man’s weapon” | New Echota | Roundup | The Trail of Tears | Blood revenge.  “An examination of the pervasive effects of the Cherokee nation’s forced relocation considers the tribe’s inability to acclimate to white culture and explores key roles played by Andrew Jackson, Chief John Ross, and Elias Boudinot.”

Smith, Ethel Morgan.  2000.  From Whence Cometh My Help: The African American Community at Hollins College [Roanoke, Va.].  Columbia: University of Missouri Press.  147 pp.

Smith, Gerald L.  2002.  Lexington, Kentucky [photo retrospective].  Black America Series.  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  128 pp.

Smith, Heather A.  2008.  “The Untraditional Geography of Hispanic Settlement in a New South City: Charlotte, North Carolina.”  Chap. 11 in  Immigrants Outside Megalopolis: Ethnic Transformation in the Heartland, ed., R. Jones, 237-261.  Lanham, Md.: Lexington Books.

Smith, Heather A., and Owen J. Furuseth.  2008.  “The ‘Nuevo South’: Latino Place Making and Community Building in the Middle-Ring Suburbs of Charlotte” [N.C.].  Chap. 11 in  Twenty-First-Century Gateways: Immigrant Incorporation in Suburban America, ed. A. Singer, S. Hardwick, and C. Brettell, 281-307.  Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution Press.

Smith, Heather A., and Owen J. Furuseth, ed.  2006.  Latinos in the New South: Transformations of Place.  Aldershot, England: Ashgate.  292 pp.  Contents: From Winn-Dixie to Tiendas: the remaking of the new South / Owen J. Furuseth and Heather A. Smith -- New neighbors in Dixie: the community impacts of Latino migration to Tennessee / Anita I. Drever -- The South’s silent bargain: rural reconstructuring, Latino labor and the ambiguities of migrant experience / Rebecca Maria Torres, E. Jeffrey Popke, and Holly M. Hapke -- Migrants, markets, and the transformation of natural resources management: galax harvesting in western North Carolina / Marla R. Emery, Clare Ginger, and Jim Chamberlain -- New destinations for Hispanic migrants: an analysis of rural Kentucky / Holly R. Barcus -- Hispanic population growth and public school response in two new South immigrant destinations [Miss., N.C.] / William A. Kandel and Emilio A. Parrado -- The multiple transformations of Miami / Heike C. Alberts -- Latino communities in Atlanta: segmented assimilation under construction / Susan M. Walcott and Arthur Murphy -- Placing Latino/as in the music city: Latino migration and urban transformation in Nashville, Tennessee / Jamie Winders -- Making real the mythical Latino community in Charlotte, North Carolina / Heather A. Smith and Owen J. Furuseth -- Transnationality, social spaces, and parallel worlds / Altha J. Cravey -- Across races and nations: social justice organizing in the transnational South / Barbara Ellen Smith -- The new South in perspective: observations and conclusions / John W. Frazier and Mark E. Reisinger.

Smith, Heather Anne, and Owen J. Furuseth.  2004.  “Housing, Hispanics and Transitioning Geographies in Charlotte, North Carolina.”  Southeastern Geographer 44 (November): 216-235.

Smith, Jennie M.  2005.  “The Latinization of Rome, Georgia” [Floyd Co.; carpet industry].  In The American South in a Global World, ed. J. Peacock, H. Watson, and C. Matthews, 223-234.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Smith, Jennifer Lund.  2001.  “Negotiating the Terms of Freedom: The Quest for Education in an African American Community in Reconstruction North Georgia” [Lumpkin Co.].  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 220-234.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Smith, Joanne Johnson, Florence Kennedy Barnett, and Lois Kennedy Croston.  1999.  “We the People of Chestnut Ridge: A Native Community in Barbour County” [often referred to as “Guineas”; cf. Melungeons].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 25 (Fall): 30-37.

Smith, John David.  1997.  “Review Essay: New Scholarship on John G. Fee and the Early Years of Berea College.”  Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 95 (Winter): 79-85.  Reviews The Evangelical War against Slavery and Race: The Life and Times of John G. Fee (1996), by Victor B. Howard; and A Utopian Experiment in Kentucky: Integration and Social Equality at Berea, 1866-1904 (1996), by Richard Sears.

Smith, Katharine Capshaw.  2008.  “Bessie Woodson Yancey, African-American Poet and Social Critic” [1882-1958].  Appalachian Heritage 36, no. 3 (Summer): 72-77.  Huntington, W.Va.; special issue–“African-American Appalachia.

Smith, Katy Simpson.  2010.  “‘I Look on You…As My Children’: Persistence and Change in Cherokee Motherhood, 1750-1835.”  North Carolina Historical Review 87, no. 4 (October): 403-430.  Matrilineal structure and power; whites’ imposition of cultural values; missionary attempts to “civilize.”

Smith, Marvin T.  2002.  “Aboriginal Population Movements in the Postcontact Southeast.”  In The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, 1540-1760, ed. R. Ethridge and C. Hudson, 3-20.  Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.

Smith, William Jay.  2000.  The Cherokee Lottery: A Sequence of Poems [of 1838 Trail of Tears forced relocation].  Willimantic, Conn.: Curbstone Press.  97 pp.

Sneed, Sarah Margaret.  2009.  “Uniform Indians: Personal Reflections on the Eastern Band Cherokee Boarding School Experience.”  Appalachian Heritage 37, no. 4 (Fall): 49-55.

Snow, Dean R.  2001.  “The Lessons of Northern Iroquoian Demography” [A.D. 750-1996]. In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 264-277.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Snow, Whitney Adrienne.  2008.  “Slave Owner, Slave Trader, Gentleman: Slavery and the Rise of Andrew Jackson.”  Journal of East Tennessee History 80: 47-59.

Snyder, Christina.  2007.  “Conquered Enemies, Adopted Kin, and Owned People: The Creek Indians and Their Captives” [history of slavery].  Journal of Southern History 73, no. 2 (May): 255-288.

Snyder, Christina.  2010.  Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America.  Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.  329 pp.  Yamasee War (1715-1718), a turning point.

Solá, José O.  2011.  “The Origins and Formation of the Latino Community in Northeast Ohio, 1900 to 2009” [mainly Cleveland].  Ohio History 118, no. 1: 112-129.

Spanish Mountaineers [special report, followed by two articles].  2009.  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 35, no. 3 (Fall): 13-25.  Early 20th century immigrants from Spain, many from Asturias province, recruited as workers for Harrison County’s zinc industry.  See also Pinnick Kinnick Hill: An American Story, by G. W. Gonzalez (West Virginia University Press, 2003).

Sparks, John.  2006.  “Review Essay: Elizabeth Caldwell Hirschman’s Melungeons: The Last Lost Tribe in America” (Mercer University Press, 2005).  Appalachian Journal 33, no. 2 (Winter): 210-221.

Spears, Ellen.  2011.  “‘Rights Still Being Righted’: Scottsboro Eighty Years Later” [online essay; 1932 Jackson Co., Ala.; nine black men falsely accused of rape].  Southern Spaces: An Interdisciplinary Journal about Regions, Places, and Cultures of the American South and Their Global Connections, 16 June 2011.  “... on the March 25, 2011 commemoration activities ... Spears reflects on how the Scottsboro trials have been represented and remembered...and the challenges of civil rights memorialization.”  Recommended Resources: print, film, links.  http://www.southernspaces.org/2011/rights-still-being-righted-scottsboro-eighty-years-later.

Spinney, Russell.  2010.  “The Sons of the Old Chiefs: Surveying Identity and European-American Relationships in the ‘New Purchase’ Territory (Centre County, Pennsylvania, 1769-1778).” Chap. 6 in Pennsylvania’s Revolution, ed. W. Pencak, 121-143.  University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.

Spradlin, Michael P.  2002.  The Legend of Blue Jacket [Shawnee chief, b. ca. 1752; juvenile literature; Indian captivity; Ohio Valley].  Illustrated by Ronald Himler.  New York: HarperCollins.

Spriggs, Bianca.  2010.  “What the Road Had to Say: The Affrilachian Poets Spring Bus Tour.”  Pluck: The Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture, no. 5: 10-15.

Spriggs, Bianca.  2011.  “Frank X Walker: Exemplar of Affrilachia.”  Appalachian Heritage 39, no. 4 (Fall): 21-25.  Biographical sketch of this featured poet.

Spriggs, Bianca.  2011.  How Swallowtails Become Dragons [poems; Affrilachian].  Lexington, Ky.: Accent.  24 pp.

Spurlock, Pat.  [1999] 2012.  Melungeons: Examining an Appalachian Legend.  3rd ed.  [United States]: CreateSpace.  378 pp.  Originally published by Pat Spurlock Elder: Blountville, Tenn.: Continuity Press.  Appendices: Timeline; Surnames.

St. Jean, Wendy.  2009.  “How the Chickasaws Saved the Cumberland Settlement in the 1790s” [allied against hostile Creeks].  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 68, no. 1 (Spring): 2-19.

Staley, Kathryn L.  2006.  “Review Essay: Wayne Winkler’s Walking toward the Sunset: The Melungeons of Appalachia” [Mercer University Press, 2004].  Appalachian Journal 33, no. 2 (Winter): 222-225.

Stealey, John E., III.  2001.  “Slavery in the Kanawha Salt Industry” [antebellum Va. (W.Va.)].  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 50-73.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Previously published as chapter 2 in John E. Stealey, III, The Antebellum Kanawha Salt Business and Western Markets, Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1993.

Steele, Ian K.  2006.  “The Shawnees and the English: Captives and War, 1753-1765.”  Chap. 1 in The Boundaries between Us: Natives and Newcomers along the Frontiers of the Old Northwest Territory, 1750-1850, ed. D. Barr, 1-24.  Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press.

Stenger, Mary Beth.  2002.  “Lebanese in the Land of Opportunity: The Michael Family of Clarksburg” [1890s immigration].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 28 (Winter): 22-28.

Stock, Melissa A.  2008.  “Sovereign or Suzerain: Alexander McGillivray’s Argument for Creek Independence after the Treaty of Paris of 1783.”  Georgia Historical Quarterly 92, no. 2 (Summer): 149-176.

Stolarik, M. Mark.  2002.  “A Slovak Perspective on the Lattimer Massacre” [1897; Luzerne Co.].  Pennsylvania History 69 (Winter): 31-41.

Striffler, Steve.  2005.  “We’re All Mexicans Here: Poultry Processing, Latino Migration, and the Transformation of Class in the South.”  In The American South in a Global World, ed. J. Peacock, H. Watson, and C. Matthews, 152-165.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Striffler, Steve.  2009.  “Immigration Anxieties: Policing and Regulation Workers and Employers in the Poultry Industry” [Tyson-Shelbyville, Tenn.].  Chap. 5 in Global Connections & Local Receptions: New Latino Immigration to the Southeastern United States, ed. F. Ansley and J. Shefner, 129-154.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Sturm, Circe.  2002.  “Blood Politics, Racial Classification, and Cherokee National Identity: The Trials and Tribulations of the Cherokee Freedmen.” Chap. 8 in Confounding the Color Line: The Indian-Black Experience in North America,  ed. J. Brooks, 223-257.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Sugden, John.  2000.  Blue Jacket: Warrior of the Shawnees [ca. 1752-ca. 1808; Ohio Valley].  American Indian Lives.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  350 pp.

Sutton, David H.  [1990] 2010.  Helvetia: The History of a Swiss Village in the Mountains of West Virginia.  2nd ed.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.  176 pp.  Originally published: New York: Peter Lang, and titled One’s Own Hearth Is Like Gold: A History of Helvetia, West Virginia.

Swain, G. T.  [1927] 2008.  The Story of Princess Aracoma: And the Settling of West Virginia [1780].  Chapmanville, W.Va: LNAB.  110 pp.  Daughter of murdered Shawnee Chief Cornstalk.

Swatzler, David.  2000.  A Friend Among the Senecas: The Quaker Mission to Cornplanter’s People [Western Pa., and N.Y.; includes transcript of Henry Simmons’ 1799 journal].  Mechanicsburg, Pa.: Stackpole Books.  319 pp.

Sweet, Timothy.  2002.  “Cherokee ‘Improvements’ and the Removal Debate.”  Chap. 6 in American Georgics: Economy and Environment in American Literature, 122-152.  Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Switala, William J.  2001.  Underground Railroad in Pennsylvania.  Mechanicsburg, Pa.: Stackpole Books.  216 pp.

Switala, William J.  2004.  Underground Railroad in Delaware, Maryland, and West Virginia. Mechanicsburg, Pa.: Stackpole Books.  166 pp.

Symposium on Daniel Letwin: The Challenge of Interracial Unionism [UMW; Birmingham District, Ala.; 1878-1921].  2000.  Alex Lichtenstien, “Exploring the Local World of Interracialism,” 63-67;  John Higginson, “Digging a Little Deeper,” 68-71;  Jacqueline Jones, “Interracialism Above Ground, Jim Crow Below,” 71-73;  Nancy Maclean, “‘Race-ing Class, Historicizing Categories,’” 73-77;  Alexander Saxton, “A Shield Against the Power of Industrial Capitalism,” 77-80;  Daniel Letwin, “Challenge to What? Challenge for Whom?” 80-90.  In Labor History 41 (February): 63-90.

Tartt, Ruby Pickens.  [1991] 2002.  “Honey in the Rock”: The Ruby Pickens Tartt Collection of Religious Folk Songs from Sumter County, Alabama [African American spirituals, poetry, folk songs].  Edited and with preface, introduction, and bibliographic essays by Olivia and Jack Solomon.  Reprint.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  176 pp.

Tate, Linda.  2009.  Power in the Blood: A Family Narrative [Cherokee-Appalachian family branch].  Ohio University Press Series in Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in Appalachia.  Athens: Ohio University Press.  229 pp.

Taylor, Arnold.  2008.  Rose, a Woman of Colour: A Slave’s Struggle for Freedom in the Courts of Kentucky [1839-1852; b. circa 1770s].  New York: iUniverse.  130 pp.

Taylor, Evelyn M. E.  1999.  Historical Digest of Jefferson County, West Virginia’s African American Congregations, 1859-1994: With Selected Churches in Neighboring Berkeley County, West Virginia, Maryland, and Virginia.  Illustrations by Stephen Q. Luckett.  Washington, D.C.: Middle Atlantic Regional Press.  264 pp.

Taylor, Jessica Lauren.  2012.  “‘To Learn the Trade of a Potter’: Apprenticeship, Conflict, and ‘Deviance’ in the Wachovian Tradition” [Moravians; N.C.].  North Carolina Historical Review 89, no. 2 (April): 126-154.

Taylor, Kathryn Trauth.  2011.  “Naming Affrilachia: Toward Rhetorical Ecologies of Identity Performance in Appalachia.”  Enculturation: A Journal of Rhetoric, Writing, and Culuture, 21 June.  7200 words, with maps, video and sound clips.  http://www.enculturation.net/naming-affrilachia.

Tedesco, Marie.  1996.  “The Opposite Sides of Freedom: Slavery and Emancipation in Antebellum Tennessee.”  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 55 (Spring): 66-83.

Tedesco, Marie.  2001.  “A Free Black Slave Owner in East Tennessee: The Strange Case of Adam Waterford” [Sullivan Co.].  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 133-153.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Previously published under a different title in Tennessee Historical Quarterly 55 (1996): 66-83.

Teuton, Chris.  2007.  “Scary Stories: An Interview with Traditional Keetoowah/Cherokee Storyteller, Novelist, and Filmmaker Mr. Sequoyah Guess.”  Mississippi Quarterly 60, no. 1 (Winter): 151-177.

Teuton, Christopher B.  2007.  “Interpreting Our World: Authority and the Written Word in Robert J. Conley’s Real People Series.”  MFS Modern Fiction Studies 53, no. 3 (Fall): 544-568.

Teuton, Christopher B.  2012.  Cherokee Stories of the Turtle Island Liars’ Club: Dakasi Elohi Anigagoga Junilawisdii (Turtle, Earth, the Liars, Meeting Place).  Written by Christopher B. Teuton; told by Hastings Shade, Sammy Still, Sequoyah Guess, and Woody Hansen.  Illustrations by America Meredith.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  252 pp.

Tewari, Meenu.  2005.  “Nonlocal Forces in the Historical Evolution and Current Transformation of North Carolina’s Furniture Industry” [skilled Mexican immigrants; High Point and Hickory, N.C.].  In The American South in a Global World, ed. J. Peacock, H. Watson, and C. Matthews, 113-137.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Thom, Dark Rain, and James Alexander Thom.  2003.  Warrior Woman: A Novel.  New York: Ballantine.  450 pp.  Upper Ohio Valley; historical fiction based on the life of Nonhelema, Shawnee woman chief, ca. 1720-ca. 1786.

Thomas, Mary.  2012.  “Common Ground: August Wilson Center Exhibit Explores African-American Identity in the Appalachian Region” [Pittsburgh; Art Review].  Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 7 March, 1(C).  1,291 words.  46 artworks by 31 artists address the Affrilachian experience “through a variety of media including painting, sculpture, printmaking, ceramics, fiber, drawing and installation.”

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/12067/1214880-437.stm#ixzz1opc5BBEK.

Thompson, Charles D.  Jr.  2011.  “Documenting Migrants: An Interview with Charles D. Thompson” [online; multimedia].  Southern Spaces: An Interdisciplinary Journal about Regions, Places, and Cultures of the American South and Their Global Connections, 29 August 2011.  Thompson “revisits the making of two documentaries that he co-produced: Brother Towns/Pueblos Hermanos (2010) and The Guestworker/Bienvenidos a Carolina del Norte (2007).”  Sections: Introduction | Ag and Anthro | Documentary and its Limits | Creating Dialogue | POV and Reception | Foreign Policy and Local People | Globalization, Recession, and the Border | Storytelling and Policy | Recommended Resources.  http://www.southernspaces.org/2011/documenting-migrants-interview-charles-d-thompson-jr.

Thompson, Deborah J., and Darrin Hacquard.  2009.  “Region, Race, Representation: Observations from Interviews with African American Musicians in Appalachia.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 15, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 126-139.  Issue of marginalization.

Thompson, Evelyn Scales.  2005.  Around Surry County [N.C.; from 1800s slavery to 1950s; pictorial history].  Black America series.  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  128 pp.

Thompson Jr., Charles D.  2005.  “Raising Citizens: The Old German Baptist Brethren and Community-Based Farming in the Virginia Blue Ridge” [Franklin Co., Va.].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 11, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 182-194.

Thompson, Sarah S.  1996.  Journey From Jerusalem: An Illustrated Introduction to Erie’s African American History, 1795-1995 [northwest Pa.].  Erie, Pa.: Erie County Historical Society.  98 pp.

Thornton, J. Mills.  2002.  Dividing Lines: Municipal Politics and the Struggle for Civil Rights in Montgomery, Birmingham, and Selma.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  733 pp.

Timberlake, Henry.  2007 [1765].  The Memoirs of Lt. Henry Timberlake: The Story of a Soldier, Adventurer, and Emissary to the Cherokees, 1756-1765.  Cherokee, N.C.: Museum of the Cherokee Indian Press.  176 pp.  Originally published: London: Printed for the author.

Tinnell, Shannon Colaianni.  2011.  “Feast of the Seven Fishes” [Italian festival, Fairmont].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 37, no. 4 (Winter): 56-59.  Centuries-old, southern Italian Christmas Eve custom, consisting of a seafood meal.  Sidebar recipe, “Stuffed Calamari.”

Todish, Timothy J., Robert Griffing, and Denise L. Ritter.  2007.  The Narrative Art of Robert Griffing: The Journey Continues.  Text and introduction by Tim J. Todish; foreword by Fred Anderson; and editing by Denise L. Ritter.  Gibsonia, Pa.: Paramount Press.  190 pp.  Oversized art book with reproductions of Griffing’s stunning paintings of 18th-century Native Americans and French and Indian War scenes in the Upper Ohio Valley.

Torres, John Albert.  2006.  The Cherokee Trail of Tears and the Forced March of a People [juvenile audience].  The Wild History of the American West series.  Berkeley Heights, N.J.: MyReportLinks.com Books.  128 pp.

Townsend, Russell G.  2002.  “Curating Our Past: Museum Direction Driven by Tribal Perspectives” [Cherokee].  In Southern Indians and Anthropologists: Culture, Politics, and Identity, ed. L. Lefler and F. Gleach, 69-76.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 35.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Trotter, Joe W., Jr.  1996.  “Black Miners in West Virginia: Class and Community Responses to Workplace Discrimination, 1920-1930.”  In The United Mine Workers of America: A Model of Industrial Solidarity?, ed. J. Laslett, 269-296.  University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.

Trotter, Joe William, and Jared N. Day.  2010.  Race and Renaissance: African Americans in Pittsburgh since World War II.  Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.  328 pp.  Contents: War, politics, and the creation of the black community -- New migrations, Renaissance I, and the challenge to Jim Crow -- Pittsburgh’s modern Black Freedom Movement -- In the shadows of Renaissance II -- Toward the new century: forging their own Renaissance.

Trotter, Joe William, Jr.  1998.  River Jordan: African American Urban Life in the Ohio Valley [Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Louisville, and Evansville].  Ohio River Valley Series.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  224 pp.

Trotter, Joe William, Jr.  2001.  “The Formation of Black Community in Southern West Virginia Coalfields.”  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 284-301.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Previously published as chapter 2 in Joe William Trotter, Jr., Coal, Class, and Color, Urbana: Univ. of Illinois Press, 1990.

Trotter, Joe William, Jr.  2002.  “Black Migration to Southern West Virginia.”  In Transnational West Virginia: Ethnic Communities and Economic Change, 1840-1940, ed. K. Fones-Wolf and R. Lewis, 136-159.  West Virginia and Appalachia series, no. 1.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.

Trotter, Joe William, Jr.  2012.  “Introduction” [history of blacks in W.Va.].  In History of the American Negro: West Virginia Edition, by A. B. Caldwell, xi-xxiii.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.  Originally published: Atlanta, Ga.: A. B. Caldwell Publishing Co., 1923.

Trotter, Joe William, Jr., and Eric Ledell Smith, ed.  1997.  African Americans in Pennsylvania: Shifting Historical Perspectives [1684-1985; 19 essays and a literature review].  University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, and Harrisburg: Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.  519 pp.

Tunagur, Usame, and Thomas R. Britt.  2007.  “Business As Usual: Exploring the Other from Arabia to Appalachia” [analyzes two films, The Sheik (1921) and Songcatcher (2001)].  Americana: The Journal of American Popular Culture, 1900-Present 6, no. 2 (Fall): 4000 words.  http://www.americanpopularculture.com/journal/articles/fall_2007/tunagur_britt.htm.

Turner, Bill.  2007.  “Welcoming Walker’s Pluck: Appalachian African American Arts and Letters” [Frank X Walker, ed.].  Pluck: The Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture, no. 2: 33-34.

Turner, George A.  2002.  “The Lattimer Massacre: A Perspective from the Ethnic Community” [1897; anthracite region].  Pennsylvania History 69 (Winter): 11-30.

Turner, William H.  2006.  “Both Ends of the Road: Making the Appalachian Connection” [Appalachian Studies and Black Studies: 2006 Appalachian Studies Association conference Keynote Address, Sinclair Community College, Dayton, Ohio, March 17].  Appalachian Journal 33, no. 3-4 (Spring/Summer): 288-300.

Turner, William H.  2008.  “This Side of the Mountain” [guest editorial].  Appalachian Heritage 36, no. 3 (Summer): 7-12.  Special issue–“African-American Appalachia.”

Turner, William H.  2011.  “Affrilachia as ‘Brand’.”  Appalachian Heritage 39, no. 4 (Fall): 27-30.  Frank X Walker’s “cobbling together of Africa and Appalachia”; and “Affrilachia as Geo-Political Concept.”

Twiss, Pamela.  2004.  “Ernest Rice McKinney: African American Appalachian, Social Worker, Radical Labor Organizer and Educator” [b. 1886, Malden, W.Va.; 1930s Pittsburgh organizer].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 10 (Spring/Fall): 95-110.

Uhl, Lauren, and Tracy L. Coffing.  2003.  Pittsburgh’s Strip District: Around the World in a Neighborhood.  Pittsburgh: Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania.  93 pp.  “People from across the Northeast visit Pittsburgh’s Strip District to stock up on fresh fruits, coffee, cheeses, and a big dose of local culture.”

Utz,  Karen R.  2006.  “Goin’ North: The African American Women of Sloss Quarters” [steel industry company housing, Birmingham, Ala.; 1880s-1940s].  In Work, Family, and Faith: Rural Southern Women in the Twentieth Century, ed. M. Walker and R. Sharpless, 229-256.  Columbia: University of Missouri Press.

Valadez, Gilbert.  2004.  “Walking to the Dance: Teaching and Cross-Cultural Encounter” [graduate seminar, 2001, Southwestern Va.].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 10 (Spring/Fall): 152-166.

Vande Brake, Katherine.  2001.  How They Shine: Melungeon Characters in the Fiction of Appalachia.  Melungeons series, no. 3.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  298 pp.

VanDerBeets, Richard.  1994.  Held Captive by Indians: Selected  Narratives, 1642-1836.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee  Press.  374 pp.

Vann, Barry Aron.  2008.  In Search of Ulster-Scots Land: The Birth and Geotheological Imagings of a Transatlantic People, 1603-1703.  Columbia: University of South Carolina Press.  252 pp.  Emigration and immigration.

Vann, Barry.  2004.  Rediscovering the South’s Celtic Heritage [Scots-Irish history].  Johnson City, Tenn.: Overmountain Press.  176 pp.

Vecchio, Diane C.  2012.  “Making Their Way in the New South: Jewish Peddlers and Merchants in the South Carolina Up Country.”  South Carolina Historical Magazine 13, no. 1 (January): 100-124.

Velazquez, Loida C.  1999.  “Finding a Voice: Latinas in the South” [N.C., Tenn.].  In Neither Separate Nor Equal: Women, Race, and Class in the South, ed. B. Smith, 125-137.  Women in the Political Economy series.  Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Vennum, Thomas, Jr.  1994.  American Indian Lacrosse: Little  Brother of War.  Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press.  360 pp.

Vest, Jay Hansford C.  2009.  “Crossing Paths: Intersections between Louis Michel and Monacan Oral Traditions” [Va.; 1701-1704].  Native South 2: 163-174.

Vick, R. Alfred.  2011.  “Cherokee Adaptation to the Landscape of the West and Overcoming the Loss of Culturally Significant Plants.”  American Indian Quarterly 35, no. 3 (Summer): 394-417.  Tables: Lost Species.  “Many species were lost as a result of the Trail of Tears, but innovation and perseverance allowed many to be found again.”

Villatoro, Marcos McPeek.  1998.  “Latino Southerners: A New Form of ‘Mestizaje’” [Blount Co., Ala.].  In Cultural Diversity in the U.S. South: Anthropological Contributions to a Region in Transition, ed. C. Hill and P. Beaver, 104-114.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 31.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Vivian, Daniel.  2011.  “Interpreting the History of the Underground Railroad in Southwest Ohio: The John P. Parker House” [Ripley, Oh.].  Ohio Valley History 11, no. 3 (Fall): 65-77.

Waak, Patricia.  2005.  My Bones Are Red: A Spiritual Journey with a Triracial People in the Americas [Perkins Family: Cherokee, African, British; migrated: Carolinas, Va., Tenn., Miss., La., Tex.].  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  158 pp.

Waalkes, Mary, and Donna Summerlin.  2007.  “Flying Below the Radar: Activist, Paternalist, and Obstructionist Responses to the Civil Rights Movement in Three East Tennessee Communities” [1950s-60s Chattanooga, Cleveland, and Polk Co.].  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 66, no. 3 (Fall): 270-293.

Wagner, Thomas E., and Phillip J. Obermiller.  2004.  African American Miners and Migrants: The Eastern Kentucky Social Club [Harlan Co. roots: Benham, Lynch; annual reunions].  Afterword by William H. Turner.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.  158 pp.

Walker, Frank X.  2000.  Affrilachia: Poems by Frank X. Walker.  Lexington, Ky.: Old Cove Press.  100 pp.

Walker, Frank X.  2006.  Black Box: Poems [68 autobiographical poems].  Lexington, Ky.: Old Cove Press.  121 pp.

Walker, Frank X.  2009.  “Learning to Hear Voices: A Conversation (Recorded at the Frank X Walker Literary Festival, Emory & Henry College, October 24, 2008).”  Interview by Jim Minick.  The Iron Mountain Review 25 (Spring): 28-34.

Walker, Frank X.  2009.  Seven poems contributed for the “Frank X Walker” special issue, Iron Mountain Review 25 (Spring): 4-10.

Walker, Frank X.  2010.  Isaac Murphy: I Dedicate This Ride [poems].  Lexington, Ky.: Old Cove Press.  66 pp.  “In this richly imagined collection, Frank X Walker brings to life the mind and heart of legendary African-American jockey Isaac Burns Murphy (1861-1896),” three-time winner of the Kentucky Derby.

Walker, Frank X.  2011.  “‘Still Chasing These Words’: A Conversation with Frank X Walker.”  Interview by Bruce Allen Dick and Forrest Gray Yerman.  Appalachian Journal 38, no. 4 (Summer): 408-422.

Walker, Melissa.  1998.  “African Americans and TVA Reservoir Property Removal: Race in a New Deal Program” [east Tenn.].  Agricultural History 72 (Spring): 417-428.

Walker, Robert Sparks.  [1931] 1993.  Torchlights to the Cherokees: The Brainerd Mission [Rhea Co., Tenn.; 1816-1838; establ. by the Boston-based American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions].  Reprint.  Johnson City, Tenn.: Overmountain Press.  339 pp.  Originally published: New York: Macmillan.

Walker, Vanessa Siddle, with Ulysses Byas.  2009.  Hello Professor: A Black Principal and Professional Leadership in the Segregated South.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  293 pp.  Byas served as a black school principal in 1950s-60s Gainesville, Ga.

Walker, Willard.  2002.  “The Twentieth-Century Conservators of the Cherokee Sacred Formulas” [initially collected 1887-88, Big Cove, N.C.].  In Southern Indians and Anthropologists: Culture, Politics, and Identity, ed. L. Lefler and F. Gleach, 107-114.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 35.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Ward, Martina, Rose Williams, and Kyle Tharp.  2012.  “Growing Tennessee: Rural Youth Cultivate a Common Group” [photo essay; Latino children].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 28, no. 1 (Summer): 21-25.  The Growing Tennessee Youth Initiative was developed in 2005 “to provide outreach to the older siblings of the children enrolled in Migrant and Seasonal Head Start.”

Ward, Matthew C.  2001.  “Redeeming the Captives: Pennsylvania Captives among the Ohio Indians, 1755-1765” [Ohio Valley].  Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 125 (July): 161-189.

Ward, Matthew C.  2006. “‘The Indians Our Real Friends’: The British Army and the Ohio Indians, 1758-1772” [Gen. Forbes, Fort Pitt, Pa.].  Chap. 4 in The Boundaries between Us: Natives and Newcomers along the Frontiers of the Old Northwest Territory, 1750-1850, ed. D. Barr, 66-86.  Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press.

Warren, Stephen.  2005.  The Shawnees and Their Neighbors, 1795-1870.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.  217 pp.

Watson, Harry L.  2008.  “First Peoples.”  Special issue, Southern Cultures 14, no. 4 (Winter): 1-150.  Contents: Front Porch / Watson, Harry L. -- “The Obituary of Nations”: Ethnic Cleansing, Memory, and the Origins of the Old South / James Taylor Carson -- Mississippi Choctaws and Racial Politics / Katherine M. B. Osburn -- “When Carolina Indians Went on the Warpath”: The Media, the Klan, and the Lumbees of North Carolina /  Christopher Arris Oakley -- Showdown at Hayes Pond: Testimonials from the Fayetteville Observer’s Fiftieth Anniversary Commemoration of the Klan-Lumbee Clash / James Jones -- Remembering  Cherokee Removal in Civil Rights–Era Georgia / Andrew Denson --  Glimpses of a Nearby Nation: The Making of Catawba Pottery with Georgia Harris and Edith Harris Brown / Lorene B. Harris, Thomas J. Blumer, and Brett H. Riggs -- The Indian Sports Mascot Meets Noble Savage and Noble Savage Confronts Indian Mascot / Leanne Howe -- Mother Corn and the Dixie Pig: Native Food in the Native South / Rayna Green -- “Tiger Tiger”: Miccosukee Rock ‘n’ Roll / Patsy West -- The Life of the Tiger Brothers / Lee Tiger -- When Heritage Is Hip / Larry J. Griffin.

Webb, James H.  2004.  Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America.  New York: Broadway Books.  369 pp.

Webb, Michael D.  1999.  “‘God Bless You All -- I Am Innocent’: Sheriff Joseph F. Shipp, Chattanooga, Tennessee, and the Lynching of Ed Johnson” [1906].  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 58 (Summer): 156-179.

Weiner, Deborah, and Maryanne Reed.  1996.  “Contradiction, Compromise & Commitment: The Jews of Beckley, West Virginia.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 13 (Winter): 3-6.

Weiner, Deborah R.  1995.  “The Jews of Clarksburg: Community Adaptation and Survival, 1900-60.”  West Virginia History 54: 59-77.

Weiner, Deborah R.  1998.  “Middlemen of the Coalfields: The Role of Jews in the Economy of Southern West Virginia Coal Towns, 1890-1950.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 4 (Spring): 29-56.

Weiner, Deborah R.  1999.  “The Jews of Keystone: Life in a Multicultural Boomtown” [W.Va.; 1890-1940].  Southern Jewish History 2: 1-23.

Weiner, Deborah R.  2002.  “From Shtetl to Coalfield: The Migration of East European Jews to Southern West Virginia.”  In Transnational West Virginia: Ethnic Communities and Economic Change, 1840-1940, ed. K. Fones-Wolf and R. Lewis, 72-111.  West Virginia and Appalachia series, no. 1.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.

Weiner, Deborah R.  2005.  “Jewish Women in the Central Appalachian Coalfields, 1890-1960: From Breadwinners to Community Builders.”  In Beyond Hill and Hollow: Original Readings in Appalachian Women’s Studies, ed. E. Englehardt, 25-49.  Athens: Ohio University Press.

Weiner, Deborah R.  2006.  “Jewish Women in the Central Appalachian Coal Fields, 1880-1960: From Breadwinners to Community Builders.”  In Dixie Diaspora: An Anthology of Southern Jewish History, ed. M. Bauman, 143-164.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.

Weiner, Deborah R.  2006.  Coalfield Jews: An Appalachian History [W.Va., Ky.].  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.  234 pp.

Weiner, Deborah.  2001.  “Jewish Women in the Central Appalachian Coal Fields, 1890-1960: From Breadwinners to Community Builders” [W.Va.].  American Jewish Archives Journal 52 no. 1-2 (2000): 10-33.

Weiner, Deborah.  2009.  “‘Scrip Was a Way of Life’: Company Stores, Jewish Merchants, and the Coalfield Retail Economy.”  In Culture, Class, and Politics in Modern Appalachia: Essays in Honor of Ronald L. Lewis, ed. J. Egolf, K. Fones-Wolf, and L. Martin, 31-55.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.

Weisberger, William.  2001.  “The Revolutionary Careers of Barnard and Michael Gratz” [Jewish American immigrants whose financial empire helped settle the wilderness].  Western Pennsylvania History 84 (Fall): 16-24.

Weissach, Lee Shai.  2006.  “East European Immigrants and the Image of Jews in the Small-Town South” [tables].  In Dixie Diaspora: An Anthology of Southern Jewish History, ed. M. Bauman, 108-142.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.

Weissbach, Lee Shai.  2000.  “Small Town Jewish Life & the Pennsylvania Pattern.”  Western Pennsylvania History 83 (Spring): 36-53.

Wellenreuther, Hermann, and Carola Wessel, ed.  2005.  The Moravian Mission Diaries of David Zeisberger, 1772-1781 [Delaware Nation; Upper Ohio Valley].  Translated by Julie Tomberlin Weber.  University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.  666 pp.  Translation of: Herrnhuter Indianermission in der Amerikanischen Revolution (Germany: Akademie Verlag, 1995).

Wells, Paul F.  2003.  “Fiddling As an Avenue of Black-White Musical Interchange” [history of black influences].  Black Music Research Journal 23, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 135-147.

Wesson, Cameron B.  2008.  Households and Hegemony: Early Creek Prestige Goods, Symbolic Capital, and Social Power.  Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.  228 pp.  Upper Creeks of the Coosa and Tallapoosa Rivers (present day Alabama), from 1600 to 1800’s removal.

West, Carroll Van, ed.  2002.  Trial and Triumph: Essays in Tennessee’s African American History [22 chapters; 1780 to Civil Rights era].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  432 pp.

West, Peter.  2010.  “Trying the Dark: Mammoth Cave and the Racial Imagination, 1839-1869” [Ky.; slavery backdrop; online essay].  Southern Spaces: An Interdisciplinary Journal about Regions, Places, and Cultures of the American South and Their Global Connections, 9 February 2010.  “...a popular tourist destination...The cave also functioned during these years as a dynamic symbol in the national imagination, appearing in travel books, lyric poems, private diaries, love letters, gothic novels, and even a moving panorama.”  Sections: Introduction | The Cave as Gothic Theater | “Trying the Dark” | The Staging of White Masculinity | The Literary Invention of Mammoth Cave | Conclusion | Notes | Recommended Resources.  Interactive illustrations, map, and a link to the U.S. National Park Service website, “Black History at Mammoth Cave.”  http://www.southernspaces.org/2010/trying-dark-mammoth-cave-and-racial-imagination-1839-1869.

White, Michael C.  2007.  Soul Catcher [historical fiction; fugitive slave].  New York: William Morrow.  418 pp.  “Struggling to forget a war-marked past...slave tracker Augustus Cain is hired by a plantation owner to retrieve a runaway slave named Rosetta.”

Whiteness and Racialization in Appalachia [10 articles].  2004.  Edited by Dwight B. Billings, Edwina Pendarvis, and Mary Kay Thomas.  Special issue, Journal of Appalachian Studies 10 (Spring/Fall): 1-228.

Whitlock, Rosemary.  2008.  The Monacan Indian Nation of Virginia: The Drums of Life [27 interviews].  Contemporary American Indian Studies series.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  221 pp.  Amherst County, Va., race relations.

Wildsmith, Dana S.  2003.  “ESL, PM, Class Code 9318” [English language class for immigrants, Winder, Ga.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 20, no. 2-3 (Summer/Winter): 22-24.

Wilkinson, Christopher.  2003.  “Hot and Sweet: Big Band Music in Black West Virginia before the Swing Era.”  American Music 21 (Summer): 159-179.

Wilkinson, Christopher.  2007.  “Big-Band Jazz in Black West Virginia: 1930-1942” [maps, tables].  West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, new series, vol. 1, no. 1 (Spring): 23-53.

Wilkinson, Christopher.  2012.  Big Band Jazz in Black West Virginia, 1930-1942.  Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.  197 pp.  “A study of how jazz greats dazzled and enlivened coal towns during the Great Depression.”

Wilkinson, Crystal E.  2000.  Blackberries, Blackberries [fiction; Ky.; 18 character sketches of black women; author is a founding member of Affrilachian Poets].  London, England: Toby Press.  192 pp.

Wilkinson, Crystal E.  [1999] 2001.  “On Being ‘Country’: One Affrilachian Woman’s Return Home.”  In Back Talk from Appalachia: Confronting Stereotypes, ed. D. Billings, G. Norman, and K. Ledford, 184-186.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Originally published as Confronting Appalachian Stereotypes.

Wilkinson, Crystal E.  2002.  Water Street [stories; Lincoln Co., Ky.].  London, England: Toby Press.  174 pp.

Wilkinson, Crystal.  2006.  “An Interview” [Ky. author of Blackberries, Blackberries (2000), and Water Street (2002)].  Interview by Morris A. Grubbs.  Appalachian Heritage 34, no. 2 (Spring): 13-23.

Wilkinson, Crystal.  2006.  “Same Blood, Same Bone, Same Blessing” [chapter excerpt from Opulence, a novel in progress].  Appalachian Heritage 34, no. 2 (Spring): 27-36.

Wilkinson, Crystal.  2012.  “Grooves in the Record: An Interview with Crystal Wilkinson” [b. 1962; Affrilachian Poet].  By Ashley Brewer, Donna Corriher, Meredith Doster, Jesse Edgerton, Hannah Furgiuele, Coty Hogue, Rebecca Jones, Blaze Pappas, Shannon Perry, with Patricia D. Beaver.  Appalachian Journal 39, no. 1-2 (Fall 2011/Winter 2012): 108-125.  Interview conducted November, 2010.

Williams, David.  2001.  “Georgia’s Forgotten Miners: African Americans and the Georgia Gold Rush of 1829” [Dahlonega, Lumpkin Co.].  In Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation, ed. John Inscoe, 40-49.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Previously published, Georgia Historical Quarterly 75 (1991): 76-90.

Williams, David.  [1993] 2003.  The Georgia Gold Rush: Twenty-Niners, Cherokees, and Gold Fever.  Reprint.  Columbia: University of  South Carolina Press.  192 pp.

Williams, Kenneth H., and James Russell Harris, comp.  2005.  “Kentucky in 1860: A Statistical Overview” [population and voting statistics by region; number of slaves, owners, and free blacks].  Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 103, no. 4: 743-764.

Willis, Rachel A.  2005.  “Voices of Southern Mill Workers: Responses to Border Crossers in American Factories and Jobs Crossing Borders” [Carolina textile mills].  In The American South in a Global World, ed. J. Peacock, H. Watson, and C. Matthews, 138-151.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Willis, William S., Jr.  [1971, 1963] 2005.  “Divide and Rule: Red, White, and Black in the Southeast” [Whites “playing Indians and Negroes against each other”].  In Culture, Ethnicity, and Justice in the South: The Southern Anthropological Society, 1968-1971, 553-569.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  (Reprint, from Proceedings No. 5.  Red, White, and Black: Symposium on Indians in the Old South, ed. C.  Hudson (1971), 99-115;  Reprinted, from The Journal of Negro History 48, no. 3 (July, 1963): 157-176).

Wilson, Darlene, and Patricia D. Beaver.  1999.  “Transgressions in Race and Place: The Ubiquitous Native Grandmother in America’s Cultural Memory” [Melungeon history].  In Neither Separate Nor Equal: Women, Race, and Class in the South, ed. B. Smith, 34-56.  Women in the Political Economy series.  Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Winders, Jamie.  2009.  “Placing Latino Migration and Migrant Experiences in the U.S. South: The Complexities of Regional and Local Trends.”  Chap. 8 in Global Connections & Local Receptions: New Latino Immigration to the Southeastern United States, ed. F. Ansley and J. Shefner, 223-244.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Winkler, Wayne.  2004.  Walking Toward the Sunset: The Melungeons of Appalachia [history].  Melungeons series.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  314 pp.

Winkler, Wayne.  2007.  “Digging for Heritage: Lisa Alther’s Search for Her Melungeon Roots.” Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 23, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 40-41.

Winkler, Wayne.  2010.  “Mahala Mullins: The Facts Behind a Tennessee Folk Legend” [1824-1898, Newman’s Ridge, Hancock Co.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 26, no. 1 (Summer): 51-54.  Sensationalized Melungeon moonshiner reputed, by exaggerated accounts, to weigh 800 pounds.

Winkler, Wayne.  2012.  “Juan Chiu’s ‘Ritmo Latino’” [“Latin Rhythm”; WETS-FM].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 28, no. 1 (Summer): 58-60.  Bilingual radio program broadcasts Sunday evening throughout east Tennessee, southwest Virginia, and western North Carolina.

Wood, Douglas McClure.  2008.  “‘I Have Now Made a Path to Virginia’: Outacite Ostenaco and the Cherokee-Virginia Alliance in the French and Indian War” [1755-1758].  West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, new series, 2, no. 2 (Fall): 31-60.

Wood, Karenne, ed.  2007.  The Virginia Indian Heritage Trail [eight tribes briefly profiled; historic sites].  Charlottesville: Virginia Foundation for the Humanities.  80 pp.

Wood, Peter H.  2005.  “George Washington, Dragging Canoe, and Southeastern Indian Resistance” [Cherokee country].  Chap. 10 in George Washington’s South, ed. T. Harvey and G. O’Brien, 259-277.  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.

Woodrum, Robert H.  2007.  “Everybody Was Black Down There”: Race and Industrial Change in the Alabama Coalfields [1930-2003; UMWA’s efforts and failings; Birmingham].  Politics and Culture in the Twentieth-Century South.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  304 pp.

Woods, Lee Ann.  2003.  “Drawing the Stories of Two Cultures” [African American sketch artist David White of Oak Ridge, Tenn.].  Appalachian Heritage 31 (Spring): 52-55.

Woodward, Susan L., and Jerry N. McDonald.  2002.  Indian Mounds of the Middle Ohio Valley: A Guide to Mounds and Earthworks of the Adena, Hopewell, Cole, and Fort Ancient People.  2nd ed.  Blacksburg, Va.: McDonald & Woodward; distributed by University of Nebraska Press.  304 pp.

Woolfolk, Odessa.  2006.  “From Confrontation to Reconciliation, From Bombing to Bricks to Brotherhood: The Story of the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute.”  Interview by Fred Sauceman.  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 22, no. 2 (Fall/Winter): 38-43.

Worth, John E.  2002.  “Spanish Missions and the Persistence of Chiefly Power” [“frontier” Creeks].  In The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, 1540-1760, ed. R. Ethridge and C. Hudson, 39-64.  Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.

Wray, Matt.  2006.  Not Quite White: White Trash and the Boundaries of Whiteness.  Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press.  213 pp.  Contents: White trash as social difference: groups, boundaries, and inequalities -- Lubbers, crackers, and poor white trash: borders and boundaries in the colonies and the early republic -- Imagining poor whites in the antebellum South: abolitionist and pro-slavery fictions -- “Three generations of imbeciles are enough”: American eugenics and poor white trash -- “The disease of laziness”: crackers, poor whites, and hookworm crusaders in the new South -- Limning the boundaries of whiteness.

Wright, Amos J.  2003.  Historic Indian Towns in Alabama, 1540-1838 [details 398 ancient towns, alphabetically]. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  239 pp.

Wright, Todd, and John Higby.  2003.  “Appalachian Jazz: Some Preliminary Notes.” Black Music Research Journal 23, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 53-65.

Yarbrough, Fay A.  2008.  Race and the Cherokee Nation: Sovereignty in the Nineteenth Century.  Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.  184 pp.

Yardley, Robert.  2005.  “The Last Medicine Man in Cherokee.”  Nantahala: A Review of Writing and Photography in Appalachia 3, no. 1 (Winter): nonfiction section, 4300 words.  http://nantahalareview.org/issue3-1/non-fiction/Yardley%20.htm.

Yates, Donald N., and Elizabeth C. Hirschman.  2010.  “Toward a Genetic Profile of Melungeons in Southern Appalachia.”  Appalachian Journal 38, no. 1 (Fall): 92-111.  “...the top population matches...showed notable levels of Jewish..., Middle Eastern, Native American, Sub-Saharan African, and Iberian ancestry.” Figures; plus profiles of other Appalachian ethnic groups.

Yeatts, Jason M.  2011.  “‘That We May Think Right, Vote Right, and Do Right’: Knoxville’s Black Community, 1865-1867.”  Journal Of East Tennessee History 82, (2010): 76-100.  Freedman’s Mission of the United Presbyterian Church.

Young, Neely.  2011.  Ripe for Emancipation: Rockbridge and Southern Antislavery from Revolution to Civil War.  Buena Vista, Va.: Mariner Publishing.  221 pp.  “This tradition of antislavery sentiment thrived most in the Appalachian regions of western Virginia, western North Carolina, eastern Tennessee, and Kentucky.  One of the centers...was Rockbridge County, Virginia.”

Youngdeer, Robert S.  2009.  “Stickball in My Youth” [memoir; 1930s Cherokee Qualla Boundary, N.C.].  Appalachian Heritage 37, no. 4 (Fall): 71-73.

Youngdeer, Robert S.  2012.  The Memoirs of Robert Youngdeer: Marine, Chief & Proud American.  Cherokee, N.C.: Museum of the Cherokee Indian Press.  464 pp.  Born 1922, Youngdeer served as Principal Chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, 1983-1987.

Zeisberger, David.  2005.  The Moravian Mission Diaries of David Zeisberger, 1771-1781 [Upper Ohio Valley].  Edited by Hermann Wellenreuther and Carola Wessel.  Translated by Julie Tomberlin.  University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.  666 pp.

Zellar, Gary.  2007.  African Creeks: Estelvste and the Creek Nation [Ga.].  Race and Culture in the American West, vol. 1.  Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.  343 pp.

Zogry, Michael J.  2010.  Anetso, the Cherokee Ball Game: At the Center of Ceremony and Identity [Eastern Band of Cherokees].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  318 pp.

Zolten, Jerry.  2003.  “Movin’ the Mountains: An Overview of Rhythm and Blues and Its Presence in Appalachia.” Black Music Research Journal 23, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 67-89.

Zuniga, Victor, and Ruben Hernandez-Leon.  2001.  “A New Destination for an Old Migration: Origins, Trajectories, and Labor Market Incorporation of Latinos in Dalton, Georgia.”  In Latino Workers in the Contemporary South, ed. A. D. Murphy, C. Blanchard, and J. A. Hill, 126-135.  Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 34.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.