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Environment, Geology, Natural History, Rivers, Parks

Conservation, pollution, mountains, forests, streams, wild flowers, wildlife, state and national parks, guidebooks.

Abernathy, Greg, Deborah White, Ellis L. Laudermilk, and Marc Evans, ed.  2010.  Kentucky’s Natural Heritage: An Illustrated Guide to Biodiversity.  Foreword by Wendell Berry.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  200 pp.  Guidebook, with 250 color photos, maps and charts.  Section headings: Introduction -- Physical overview -- Natural history -- Species and natural communities -- Threats -- Conservation.

Adams, Kevin, and Martha Casstevens.  1996.  Wildflowers of the Southern Appalachians: How to Photograph and Identify Them.  Winston-Salem: John F. Blair.  257 pp.

Adkins, Leonard M.  1998.  The Appalachian Trail: A Visitor’s Guide [naturalist guidebook].  Birmingham, Ala.: Menasha Ridge Press.  221 pp.

Adkins, Leonard M.; photographs by Joe and Monica Cook.  1999.  Wildflowers of the Appalachian Trail [guidebook].  Birmingham, Ala.: Menasha Ridge Press.  128 pp.

Alderman, J. Anthony.  1997.  Wildflowers of the Blue Ridge Parkway [field guide].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  222 pp.

Alderman, Leanna, and Eleanor Mahoney.  Above the Smoke: A Family Album of Pocahontas County Fire Towers [W.Va.; Allegheny Mountains; 1920s-1970s; oral histories; companion sound disc available].  Dunmore, W.Va.: Pocahontas Communications Cooperative.  128 pp.

Allen, Thomas J.  1997.  The Butterflies of West Virginia and Their Caterpillars.  Pitt Series in Nature and Natural History, Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.  350 pp.

Alligood, Leon.  1996.  “State of the Forest: Doing Right by the Trees.”  Southern Exposure 24 (Summer): 34-39.

Amjad, Hassan, and Quartel-Ayne Amjad.  1997.  “A Preliminary Study of Genus Trillium, Its Systematics, Morphological Variations and Flowering Cycles at the New River Gorge National River” [W.Va.].  In  Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 11-12, 1997, Glade Springs Resort, Daniels, West Virginia, 90-99.  Glen Jean, W.Va.: National Park Service.

Anderson, Larry.  2002.  Benton MacKaye: Conservationist, Planner, and Creator of the Appalachian Trail.  Creating the North American Landscape.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.  452 pp.

Anderson, Larry.  2002.  Benton MacKaye: Conservationist, Planner, and Creator of the Appalachian Trail.  Creating the North American Landscape.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.  452 pp.

Anderson, Ora E. (1911-2006).  2007.  Out of the Woods: A Bird Watcher’s Year [Ohio; seasonal observations, poems, anecdotes].  Edited by Deborah Griffith, with illustrations by Julie Zickefoose.  Athens: Ohio University Press.  176 pp.

Appalachia and the Environment.  1995.  Special issue, Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 12 (Spring): 1-40.

Armstrong, W. F.  2006.  When Whip-Poor-Wills Call.  Parsons, W.Va.: McClain Printing.  182 pp.  Short essays and sketches drawn from this conservation officer’s 40 years working in W.Va. wilderness areas.

Ausband, Stephen C.  2002.  Byrd’s Line: A Natural History [1728 survey of Va.-N.C. boundary].  Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.  187 pp.

Ayers, Harvard, Jenny Hager, and Charles E. Little, ed.; photographs by Jenny Hager. 1998.  An Appalachian Tragedy: Air Pollution and Tree Death in the Eastern Forests of North America [essays; photographs].  San Francisco: Sierra Club Books.  216 pp.

Badger, Robert L.  1999.  Geology along Skyline Drive: Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. Helena, Mont.: Falcon Publishing.  100 pp.

Bailey, Robert F.  2006.  Maryland’s Forests and Parks: A Century of Progress [photo retrospective].  Images of America.  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  128 pp.

Baldwin, Fred D.  1999.  “Clean Water: North Carolina’s Straight-Pipe Elimination Project” [Madison Co., wastewater problem; state assistance].  Appalachia: Journal of the Appalachian Regional Commission 32 (September-December): 22-27.

Bales, Stephen Lyn.  2007.  Natural Histories: Stories from the Tennessee Valley.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  261 pp.  Contents: WINTER. Carolina chickadee; River cane; Beaver; American toad -- SPRING. Freshwater mussels; Whip-poor-will; Periodical cicadas; Gray bat -- SUMMER. Passionflower; Darters; Pawpaw; Opossum -- FALL. Wild turkey; Osage orange; Eastern sycamore; Bald eagle.

Banks, Alan, Alice Jones, and Anne Blakeney.  2005.  “Headwaters: A Student/Faculty Participatory Research Project in an Eastern Kentucky Community” [Letcher Co., Ky.; land use and water quality; tables, figures].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 11, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 104-132.

Bansemer, Roger.  1993.  Mountains in the Mist: Impressions of the Great Smokies [200 stunning watercolors of mountain life].  Foreword by James A. Michener.  Dallas, Tex.: Taylor Publishing.  182 pp.

Barnes, Thomas G.  2002.  Kentucky’s Last Great Places [landscape, nature photography].  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  204 pp.

Barnes, Thomas G.  2011.  How to Find and Photograph Kentucky Wildflowers.  Morley, Mo.: Acclaim Press.  256 pp.  Guidebook; natural locations in eastern, central, and western Ky.

Barnes, Thomas G., and S. Wilson Francis.  2004.  Wildflowers and Ferns of Kentucky [guidebook; 650 species; 500 color photos].  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  344 pp.

Barnes, Thomas G., Deborah L. White, and Marc Evans.  2008.  Rare Wildflowers of Kentucky [220 color photos].  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  190 pp.

Barrick, Michael.  2001.  “Keeping West Virginia GREEN” [W.Va. parks as stewards of natural resources].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 18 (Winter): 34-38.

Barry, Joyce M.  2012.  Standing Our Ground: Women, Environmental Justice, and the Fight to End Mountaintop Removal.  Ohio University Press Series in Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in Appalachia.  Athens: Ohio University Press.  190 pp.  Contents: Living in a sacrifice zone: gender, the political economy of coal, and anti-mountaintop removal activism |  Gender and anti-mountaintop removal activism: expanding the environmental justice framework |  Remembering the past, working for the future: West Virginia women fight for sustainable communities and environmental heritage |  Saving the endangered hillbilly: Appalachian stereotypes and cultural identity in the anti-mountaintop removal movement |  Situating the particular and the universal: gender, environmental justice, and mountaintop removal in a global context.

Bartlett, Richard A.  1995.  Troubled Waters: Champion International and the Pigeon River Controversy.  Outdoor Tennessee Series.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  376 pp.

Bartram, William, and Dorinda G. Dallmeyer, ed.  2010.  Bartram’s Living Legacy: The Travels and the Nature of the South.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  567 pp.  “In this unique anthology, Travels is joined with essays acknowledging the debt Southern nature writers owe the man called the ‘South’s Thoreau’.” [Travels through North & South Carolina, Georgia, east & west Florida, the Cherokee country, the extensive territories of the Muscogulges, or Creek Confederacy, and the country of the Chactaws, by William Bartram (1739-1823)].  Seventeen essays, including: My Bartram / Janisse Ray -- Bartram’s journey to the Cherokee / Christopher Camuto -- A moral imperative: who will speak for– / Thomas Rain Crowe.

Bartram, William.  2010.  William Bartram, the Search for Nature’s Design: Selected Art, Letters, and Unpublished Writings [1739-1823].  Edited by Thomas Hallock and Nancy E. Hoffmann.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  608 pp.

Bauer, Jennifer A.  2011.  Roan Mountain: History of an Appalachian Treasure [Tenn.-N.C. border].  Charleston, S.C.: History Press.  190 pp.  Contents: Ecology | Geography | Flora and fauna | Studying the natural world | Making a living | Logging | The iron mines | The narrow gauge railroad | People and places | Early days | General John T. Wilder | Cloudland | John Muir | Protecting a resource | The Southern Appalachian National Park Commission | The Civilian Conservation Corps | Building the roads | Roan Mountain State Park | The Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy | Friends of Roan Mountain | An historical gathering.

Bauman, Russell, and Chris Lucash.  1998.  “Recovery of the Red Wolf” [interview with biologist for Southern Appalachian Reintroduction Project].  Foxfire Magazine 32 (Spring/Summer): 60-70.

Beanblossom, Robert.  2009.  “The Big Burn of ‘52” [Mingo Co. forest fires; 600,000 acres].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 35, no. 3 (Fall): 58-65.

Beane, Jeffrey C.  [1980] 2010.  Amphibians & Reptiles of the Carolinas and Virginia.  2nd ed.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  274 pp.  Identification manual with color photos, descriptions, and range maps.

Behrend, Linda.  2001.  “East Tennessee Journeys: The Photographs of Fred W. Behrend” [1896-1976; six photos].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 18 (Spring): 9-12.

Bentley, Stanley L.  2000.  Native Orchids of the Southern Appalachian Mountains [199 photos; 52 species; 57 maps].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press. 235 pp.

Berry, Wendell.  1995.  Another Turn of the Crank: Essays.  Washington, D.C.: Counterpoint.  109 pp.

Berry, Wendell.  2000.  Life is a Miracle: An Essay Against Modern Superstition.  Washington, D.C.: Counterpoint.  124 pp.

Berry, Wendell.  2002.  The Art of the Commonplace: The Agrarian Essays of Wendell Berry [21 essays; 1977-99].  Edited by Norman Wirzba.  Washington, D.C.: Counterpoint.  330 pp.

Berry, Wendell.  2012.  “It All Turns on Affection.” Wendell E. Berry Lecture  [2012 NEH Jefferson Lecture, April 23, Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts].  National Endowment for the Humanities.  8,050 words.  Berry nominates “economy” [household and neighborly] “for an equal standing among the arts and humanities,” in contrast to “boomer...pillage and run” behavior of both industries and individuals.  Includes sidebar articles: Biography / by David Skinner -- Appreciation / by Mark Bittman -- Interview / by Jim Leach.  http://www.neh.gov/about/awards/jefferson-lecture/wendell-e-berry-lecture.  Video [77:30 min.; captions]: http://events.tvworldwide.com/Events/NEH2012JeffersonLecture.aspx.

Berry, Wendell.  2012.  “Nature as an Ally: An Interview with Wendell Berry.”  By Sarah Leonard.  Dissent 59, no. 2 (Spring): 42-47.  http://www.dissentmagazine.org/article/nature-as-an-ally-an-interview-with-wendell-berry.

Berry, Wendell.  2012.  It All Turns on Affection: The Jefferson Lecture & Other Essays. Berkeley, Calif.: Counterpoint.  125 pp.  Contents: It all turns on affection | Landsman: Jim Leach in conversation with Wendell Berry and Tanya Berry | Starting from loss | The future of agriculture | A man of courage constant to the end | About civil disobedience | Maury Telleen, 1928-2011.

Black, Brian.  1997.  “Recasting the Unalterable Order of Nature: Photography and the First Oil Boom [1860s northeastern Pa., landscape].  Pennsylvania History 64 (Spring): 275-299.

Blackmarr, Amy.  2003.  Above the Fall Line: The Trail from White Pine Cabin [Dahlonega Region, Ga.; biography; natural history].  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  140 p.

Blagden, Tom, and Thomas Wyche.  1994.  South Carolina’s Mountain Wilderness: The Blue Ridge Escarpment [full-page color photographs].  Englewood, Colo.: Westcliffe Publishers.  128 pp.

Blevins, David, and Michael P. Schafale.  2011.  Wild North Carolina: Discovering the Wonders of our State’s Natural Communities.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  176 pp.  Twenty eight “communities” spotlighted, statewide; essays; full-page color photos.

Blouin, Nicole, Steve Bordonaro, and Marilou Wier Bordonaro.  2003.  Waterfalls of the Blue Ridge: A Hiking Guide to the Cascades of the Blue Ridge Mountains [approx. 100 falls].  3rd ed.  Birmingham, Ala.: Menasha Ridge Press.  195 pp.

Bolgiano, Chris, and Glenn Novak, ed.  2007.  Mighty Giants: An American Chestnut Anthology [original and classic articles by 27 authors including Jimmy Carter, Barbara Kingsolver, and John Egerton; numerous illustrations, photos, sidebars, stories].  Bennington, Vt: American Chestnut Foundation.  285 pp.

Bolgiano, Chris, and Jerry Roberts, ed.  2006.  The Eastern Cougar: Historic Accounts, Scientific Investigations, and New Evidence [36 essays and articles, grouped: Identity, Reappearance, and Outlook; bibliography].  Mechanicsburg, Pa.: Stackpole Books.  246 pp.

Bolgiano, Chris.  1998.  “Communities in Crisis” [habitat loss; salamanders].  In An Appalachian Tragedy: Air Pollution and Tree Death in the Eastern Forests of North America,  ed. H. Ayers, J. Hager, and C. E. Little, 116-125.  San Francisco: Sierra Club Books.

Bolgiano, Chris.  1998.  The Appalachian Forest: A Search for Roots and Renewal [natural history; cultural impact]. Mechanicsburg, Pa.: Stackpole Books.  280 pp.

Bolgiano, Chris.  2001.  “Confirming Eastern Cougar Presence” [sidebar, Eastern Cougar Foundation].  Wild Earth 11 (Spring): 54-56.

Bolgiano, Chris.  2002.  Living in the Appalachian Forest: True Tales of Sustainable Forestry.  Mechanicsburg, Pa.: Stackpole Books.  200 pp.

Bolgiano, Chris.  2010.  “Fracking: A New ‘F’ Word Enters the Language.”  Southern Maryland Online, 6 July.  784 words.  Commentary and succinct overview of the environmental hazards of Marcellus Shale gas drilling.  http://somd.com/news/headlines/2010/12115.shtml.

Bonta, Marcia.  1994.  Appalachian Autumn.  Pitt Series in Nature  and Natural History.  Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh   Press.  232 pp.

Bonta, Marcia.  1999.  Appalachian Summer [central Pa.; nature diary essays].  Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.  236 pp.

Bonta, Marcia.  2005.  Appalachian Winter [seasonal observations].  Pittsburgh, Pa.: University of Pittsburgh Press.  225 pp.

Borden, James D., and Roger W. Brucker.  2000.  Beyond Mammoth Cave: A Tale of Obesession in the World’s Longest Cave [Ky.].  Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.  353 pp.

Brainard, Curtis.  2010.  “Whither the Watershed: A Field Guide to Environmental Journalism in the Ohio River Valley.”  Columbia Journalism Review—The Observatory, 3 March.  3483 words.  http://www.cjr.org/the_observatory/whither_the_watershed.php.

Branch, Michael, and Daniel Philippon.  1998.  “A Place in the South” [the meaning of “place” to nature writers of Va.’s Blue Ridge Mountains and Shenandoah Valley].  Appalachian Heritage 26 (Winter): 18-25.

Branch, Michael P., and Daniel J. Philippon, ed.  1998.  The Height of Our Mountains: Nature Writing from Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains and Shenandoah Valley [anthology of 70 selections;1612-1996]. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.  448 pp.

Braunschweig, Suzanne H., Erik T. Nilsen, and Thomas F. Wieboldt.  2000.  “The Mid-Appalachian Shale Barrens” [Pa., W.Va., Va.].  In Savannas, Barrens, and Rock Outcrop Plant Communities of North America, ed. R. Anderson, 83-98.  New York: Cambridge University Press.

Brewer, Carson.  [1981] 2004.  A Wonderment of Mountains: The Great Smokies [collection of conservation columns on mountain places, plants, people; author d. 2003].  Reprint, with a new foreword by Sam Venable.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  198 pp.  Originally published: Knoxville: Tenpenny Pub.

Bridge, Gavin, and Phil McManus.  1999.  “Sticks and Stones: Environmental Narratives and Discursive Regulation in the Forestry and Mining Sectors.”  Antipode 32 (January): 10-47.

Brill, David, and Bill Campbell.  2010.  Cumberland Odyssey: A Journey in Pictures and Words Along Tennessee’s Cumberland Trail and Plateau.  Essays by David Brill, photography by Bill Campbell.  Foreword by Howard H. Baker, Jr.  Johnson City, Tenn.: Mountain Trail.  144 pp.  Streams, waterfalls, birds, and fauna; Cumberland Trail State Park; “the world’s largest hardwood-forested plateau.”

Broome, Harvey.  [1975] 2001.  Out Under the Sky of the Great Smokies: A Personal Journal [1902-1968].  Illustrated by Larry Hirst.  Reprint, with a new forword by Michael Frome.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  285 pp.  Originally published: Knoxville: Greenbrier Press.

Brown, Fred.  2007.  “A ‘River of Earth’: How It Helped Shape the People of Appalachia” [East Tenn. Valley and Ridge].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 23, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 14-17.

Brown, Margaret Lynn.  1995.  “Re-creation of the Wilderness” [Great Smoky Mountains].  Special Section: Eminent Domain.  Southern Exposure 23 (Summer): 25-29.

Brown, Margaret Lynn.  2000.  The Wild East: A Biography of the Great Smoky Mountains.  New Perspectives on the History of the South series.  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.  457 pp.

Brown, Paul Martin.  2004.  Wild Orchids of the Southeastern United States, North of Peninsular Florida [field guide: ten states].  Gainesville, Fla.: University Press of Florida.  394 pp.

Brubaker, John H.  2002.  Down the Susquehanna to the Chesapeake [history; N.Y., Pa., Md.].  University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.  277 pp.

Buckelew, Albert R., Jr., and George A. Hall.  1994.  The West  Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas.  Pitt Series in Nature and  Natural History.  Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.   272 pp.

Buckley, Geoffrey L.  1998.  “The Environmental Transformation of an Appalachian Valley, 1850-1906" [western Md.; mineral extraction].  Geographical Review 88 (April): 175-198.

Bugden, Joni L., Christopher D. Storie, and Carey L. Burda.  2011.  “Mapping Existing and Potential River Cane (Arundinaria gigantea) Habitat in Western North Carolina” [technical study].  Southeastern Geographer 51, no. 1 (Spring): 150-164.  River cane continues to “contribute to development of a traditional craft economy...of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indian (EBCI) way of life,” and is valuable to flora and fauna habitat.

Buhlmann, Kurt, Tracey Tuberville, and J. Whitfield Gibbons.  2008.  Turtles of the Southeast. Athens: University of Georgia Press.  252 pp.  Guidebook, 200 color photographs, 45 species.

Burkholder, Robert E.  2003.  “‘To See Things in Their Wholeness’: Consilience, Natural History, and Teaching Literature Outdoors” [Appalachian Trail; Penn State Univ. senior seminar].  In  Teaching in the Field: Working with Students in the Outdoor Classroom, ed. H. Crimmel, 17-32.  Salt Lake City, Utah: University of Utah Press.

Byerly, Don W., and John J. Renton, section editors.  2006.  “Geology” [signed entries].  In Encyclopedia of Appalachia, ed. R. Abramson and J. Haskell, 3-37 (with introductory essay, 3-7).  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Cahalan, James M.  1997.  “Part II — ‘My People’: Edward Abbey’s Appalachian Roots in Indiana County, Pennsylvania.”  Pittsburgh History 79 (Winter 1996/1997): 160-178.

Cahalan, James M.  2001.  Edward Abbey: A Life.  Tucson: University of Arizona Press.  359 pp.

Campbell, Carlos C.  [1967] 2005.  Memories of Old Smoky: Early Experiences in the Great Smoky Mountains [1920s-1960s; author of Birth of a National Park in the Great Smoky Mountains (1960)].  Edited by Rebecca Campbell Arrants.  Preface by George W. Fry, Park Superintendent (1963-69).  Outdoor Tennessee Series.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  216 pp.  Originally self-published.

Campbell, Tyler A., et al.  2004.  “Topographic Home Ranges of White-tailed Deer in the Central Appalachians.” Southeastern Naturalist 3, no. 4: 645-652.

Camuto, Christopher.  [1997] 2000.  Another Country: Journey Toward the Cherokee Mountains [reintroduction of red wolf to Great Smoky Mountains National Park].  Reprint.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  351 pp.  Originally published: New York: Henry Holt.

Camuto, Christopher.  2003.  Hunting From Home: A Year Afield in the Blue Ridge Mountains [Va.].  New York: W.W. Norton.  320 pp.

Casner, Nicholas.  1999.  “Angler Activist: Kenneth Reid, the Izaak Walton League, and the Crusade for Federal Water Pollution Control [1930s; Pa., W.Va.].  Pennsylvania History 66 (Autumn): 535-553.

Castle, Caron.  2010.  “Reaching Up.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 26, no. 1 (Summer): 41-43.  Personal impressions, hiking at Bays Mountain Park, Kingsport, Tenn.

Casto, James E.  2009.  The Great Ohio River Flood of 1937 [photo retrospective]. Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  127 pp.  Contents: Angry waters -- The 1936 flood -- Pennsylvania 1937 -- West Virginia 1937 -- Ohio 1937 -- Kentucky 1937 -- Indiana 1937 -- Illinois -- 1937 -- Taming the river.

Casto, James E.  2009.  The Great Ohio River Flood of 1937 [photo retrospective].  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  127 pp.  Contents: Angry waters -- The 1936 flood -- Pennsylvania 1937 -- West Virginia 1937 -- Ohio 1937 -- Kentucky 1937 -- Indiana 1937 -- Illinois -- 1937 -- Taming the river.

Cervin, Michael.  2009.  “Tasting the Waters in Berkeley Springs.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 35, no. 4 (Winter): 46-47.  International Water Tasting competition.

Che, Deborah.  2000.  “Going to the Mountains: Flatlander, Ohio-sian, and Up-here Deer: Hunters in the Allegheny National Forest Region.”  In A Geographic Perspective of Pittsburgh and the Alleghenies: From Precambrian to Post-Industrial, ed. K. Patrick and J. Scarpaci, 148-158.  Washington, D.C.: Association of American Geographers.

Chew, V. Collins.  1997.  Underfoot: A Geologic Guide to the Appalachian Trail [guidebook].  2nd ed.  Harpers Ferry, W.Va.: Appalachian Trail Conference.

Cincotta, Daniel A., Douglas B. Chambers, and Terence Messinger.  2000.  “Recent Changes in the Distribution of Fish Species in the New River Basin in West Virginia and Virginia” [maps; table].  In Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 15-16, 1999, Boone, North Carolina, 98-106.  Glen Jean, W.Va.: National Park Service.

Clancy, Patrick.  1997.  “Conserving the Youth: The Civilian Conservation Corps Experience in the Shenandoah National Park” [1933-1939].  Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 105 (Autumn): 439-470.

Clark, Jim.  1998.  West Virginia: The Allegheny Highlands [photographs].  Englewood, Colo.: Westcliffe Publishers.  119 pp.

Clark, Jim.  2003.  Mountain Memories: An Appalachian Sense of Place [nature photography].  Foreword by Kathy Mattea.  Morgantown, W.Va.: Vandalia Press.  217 pp.

Clark, Ross C., and Timothy J. Weckman.  2008.  Annotated Catalog and Atlas of Kentucky Woody Plants.  Occasional Papers in Eastern Botany, no. 3.  Supplement to Castanea: The Journal of the Southern Appalachian Botanical Society, September 2008.  114 pp.  Technical descriptions, habitat, county outline maps.

Clark, Sandra H. B.  2001.  Birth of the Mountains: The Geologic Story of the Southern Appalachian Mountains.  Reston, Va.: U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey.  23 pp.  Online at http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/birth/.

Clark, Sandra H. B.  2001.  The Southern Appalachians: A Changing World.  Reston, Va.: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Geological Survey.  Videocassette or CD (16 min.), and Teachers’ Guide (16 pp.).  Both online at http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/so_app/.

Clark, Thomas D.  [1984] 2004.  The Greening of the South: The Recovery of Land and Forest [lumbering, deforestation].  Reprint.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  168 pp.

Clines, Francis X.  2000.  “Cleanup Fights Hillbilly Stereotype.”  New York Times, 21 September, 18(A).  1,191 words.  “40 counties of eastern Kentucky, intent on scrubbing forth a new national image, have banded together....an alliance of federal, state and volunteer workers” to clean up ‘holler tipping’ garbage dumps and ‘straight pipes’ that dump raw sewage into creeks.  http://www.nytimes.com/2000/09/21/us/cleanup-fights-hillbilly-stereotype.html?scp=1&sq=cleanup%20fights%20hillbilly%20stereotype&st=cse.

Clines, Francis X.  2002.  “100-Year Flood, for the Second Straight Year” [W.Va.].  New York Times, 9 May, 26(A).

Clines, Francis X.  2002.  “Flooding in Appalachia Stirs Outrage Over a Mining Method.”  New York Times, 12 August, 8(A).

Cogbill, Charles V., Peter S. White, and Susan K. Wiser.  1997.  “Predicting Treeline Elevation in the Southern Appalachians.”  Castanea 62 (September): 137-146.

Coggins, Allen R.  1999.  Place Names of the Smokies.  Gatlinburg, Tenn.: Great Smoky Mountains Natural History Association.  167 pp.

Collins, Timothy M., Edward K. Muller, and Joel A. Tarr.  2008.  “Pittsburgh’s Three Rivers: From Industrial Infrastructure to Environmental Asset.”  Chap. 4 in Rivers in History: Perspectives on Waterways in Europe and North America, ed. C. Mauch, and T. Zeller, 41-62.  Pittsburgh, Pa.: University of Pittsburgh Press.

Colten, Craig E.  2008.  “Southern Pollution Permissiveness” [maps; rivers].  Southeastern Geographer 48, no. 1 (May): 75-96.

Comp, T. Allan.  1997.  “The Art Thing: New Partners in Old Coalfields” [community arts  involvement addressing acid mine drainage in Southwestern Pa.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 14 (Winter): 25-28.

Constantz, George.  1994.  Hollows, Peepers, and Highlanders: An  Appalachian Mountain Ecology.  Missoula, MT: Mountain Press.  264 pp.

Constantz, George.  [1994] 2004.  Hollows, Peepers, and Highlanders: An Appalachian Mountain Ecology.  2nd ed.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.  359 pp.  Originally published: Missoula, Mont.: Mountain Press.

Constantz, George, section editor.  2006.  “Ecology” [signed entries].  In Encyclopedia of Appalachia, ed. R. Abramson and J. Haskell, 39-99 (with introductory essay, 39-44).  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Core, Earl Lemley.  2005.  Spring Wild Flowers of West Virginia [guidebook; 250 species].  3rd ed.  Line drawings by William A. Lunk.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.  104 pp.  Originally published 1939 by the state’s Cooperative Extension.

Cotham, Steve.  2006.  The Great Smoky Mountains National Park [history in photos]. Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  127 pp.

Cox, John J., Nathan W. Seward, Jeffrey L. Larkin, and David S. Maehr.  2003.  “Common Raven Nests in Eastern Kentucky” [investigates abundance].  Southeastern Naturalist 2, no. 1: 99-104.

Crawford, Colin.  1996.  Uproar at Dancing Rabbit Creek: Battling Over Race, Class, and the Environment [Noxubee Co., Miss.; hazardous waste].  Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley.  384 pp.

Crews, Alvin, and David Carlock.  1998.  “The Bear Facts” [black bears in Ga.; interview with wildlife biologist].  Foxfire Magazine 32 (Fall/Winter): 120-127.

Crockett, Maureen.  2004.  Jewels in Our Crown: The State Parks of West Virginia [37 parks].  With photographs by Stephen J. Shaluta, Jr.  Charleston, W.Va.: Quarrier Press.  130 pp.

Crowe, Thomas Rain.  2003.  “The New Naturalists (The Southern Appalachian Mountains Are The Place To Look).”  Nantahala: A Review of Writing and Photography in Appalachia 2, no. 1 (Spring): nonfiction section, 18 para.  http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/nreview/issue2-1/non-fiction/crowe.html.

Crowe, Thomas Rain.  2005.  Zoro’s Field: My Life in the Appalachian Woods [N.C.; Walden-like observations, poetry].  Foreword by Christopher Camuto.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  221 pp.

Crowe, Thomas Rain.  2008.  The End of Eden: Writings of an Environmental Activist.  Illustrations by Robert Johnson.  Nicholasville, Ky.: Wind Publications.  171 pp.  Great Smoky Mountains region.

Crutchfield, John.  2004.  “Return to Mount Le Conte Or, A Short Treatise on Memory, Responsibility, and the American Black Bear” [author’s 2003 backpacking trek in Great Smoky Mountains with his mother on her 60th birthday].  Appalachian Journal 32 (Fall): 114-122.

Dann, Kevin.  2000.  “The Appalachian Trail and the American Primeval” [trail originator Benton MacKaye’s inspiration].  In Across the Great Border Fault: The Naturalist Myth in America, 35-50.  New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press.

Davis, Donald E.  2006.  “Upland: Growing Pains” [settlement, crops, livestock, mining]. Chap. 6 in Southern United States: An Environmental History, 133-157.  Nature and Human Societies.  Santa Barbara, Calif: ABC-CLIO.

Davis, Donald Edward.  2000.  Where There Are Mountains: An Environmental History of the Southern Appalachians [human ecology; landmark text].  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  320 pp.

Davis, Donald Edward.  2006.  Homeplace Geography: Essays for Appalachia [20 environmental activist essays spanning 20 years].  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  221 pp.

Davis, Donald E., and Kevin E. O’Donnell, section editors.  2006.  “Environment” [signed entries].  In Encyclopedia of Appalachia, ed. R. Abramson and J. Haskell, 101-145 (with introductory essay, 101-107).  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Davis, Frank C.  2006.  My C.C.C. Days: Memories of the Civilian Conservation Corps. [1934-1936, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, N.C.].  Boone, N.C.: Parkway Publishers.  58 pp.

Davis, Timothy, Todd A. Croteau, and Christopher H. Marston, ed.  2004.  America’s National Park Roads and Parkways: Drawings from the Historic American Engineering Record [331 oversize historic, interpretive drawings of roads, bridges, viaducts, tunnels; includes Great Smoky Mountains and Shenandoah National Parks, and Blue Ridge Parkway].  The Road and American Culture.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.  379 pp.

De Hart, Allen.  2003.  The Trails of Virginia: Hiking the Old Dominion [guidebook to 1400 trails state-wide].  3rd ed.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  540 pp.

Dick, David, and Eulalie C. Dick.  2001.  Rivers of Kentucky [visits to 38 rivers: lore, local history and literature, personalities].  Foreword by Gurney Norman.  North Middletown, Ky.: Plum Lick Publishing, Inc.  265 pp.

Dixon, Sherie, and Bill Tanner.  1998.  “The Tallulah Gorge” [oral history interview with superintendent of Tallulah Gorge State Park, Ga.].  Foxfire Magazine 32 (Fall/Winter): 106-119.

Dodd, C. Kenneth, Jr.  2004.  The Amphibians of Great Smoky Mountains National Park [guidebook to salamanders and frogs].  Illustrations by Jacqualine Grant. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  283 pp.

Douglas, Joseph C.  2004.  “Minerals, Moonshine, and Misanthropes: The Historic Use of Caves in the Upper Cumberland” [Ky, Tenn.; saltpeter, food storage, Indian mortuary, criminal hideout].  In Rural Life and Culture in the Upper Cumberland, ed. M. Birdwell and W. Dickinson, 15-34.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Duda, Mark Damian.  1999.  West Virginia Wildlife Viewing Guide [63 locations].  Helena, Mont.: Falcon Publishing.  95 pp.

Duhigg, Charles, and Karl Russell.  2009.  “Clean Water Laws Neglected, at a Cost” [W.Va.; toxic coal mine pollution; health costs].  New York Times, 13 September, 1(A).  5226 words.  http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/13/us/13water.html?_r=2.

Duhigg, Charles, and Karl Russell.  2009.  “Cleansing the Air at the Expense of Waterways” [Masontown, Pa.; Monongahela River].  Toxic Waters series.  New York Times, 13 October, 1(A).  2142 words.  Coal fired power plants in ten states are dumping chemical-laden scrubber wastewater back into rivers.  http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/13/us/13water.html?_r=1.

Edwards, Ernest P.  2006.  Birds of Shenandoah National Park, Blue Ridge Parkway, and Great Smoky Mountains National Park: A Field Guide [55 full-color pages]. Principal illustrator, Edward Murrell Butler.  Blacksburg, Va.: McDonald & Woodward.  142 pp.

Elkinton, David P.  2007.  Fighting to Protect the Highlands: The First Forty Years of the West Virginia Highlands Conservancy [comprehensive history].  Blacksburg, Va: Pocahontas Press.  517 pp.

Ellis, Ron, ed.  2005.  Of Woods and Waters: A Kentucky Outdoors Reader [74 reprints of essays, fiction, and poetry, 1889-2005, many Appalachian].  Lexington, Ky.: University Press of Kentucky.  389 pp.

Ellis, William E.  2000.  The Kentucky River [social history; geography; photos].  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  226 pp.

Ellison, George, ed.  2008.  High Vistas: An Anthology of Nature Writing from Western North Carolina and the Great Smoky Mountains, Volume 1: 1674-1900.  Charleston, S.C.: Natural History Press.  128 pp.

Ellison, George, ed.  2011.  High Vistas: An Anthology of Nature Writing from Western North Carolina and the Great Smoky Mountains, Volume 2: 1900-2009.  Charleston, S.C.: Natural History Press.  126 pp.

Ellison, George.  2005.  Mountain Passages: Natural and Cultural History of Western North Carolina and the Great Smoky Mountains.  Charleston, S.C.: History Press.  160 pp.

Ellison, George.  2006.  Blue Ridge Nature Journal: Reflections on the Appalachian Mountains in Essays and Art [flora, fauna, watercolors].  Essays by George Ellison with paintings by Elizabeth Ellison.  Charleston, S.C.: History Press, 2006.

Engle, Reed L.  1999.  Everything Was Wonderful: A Pictorial History of the Civilian Conservation Corps in Shenandoah National Park [Va.; 1930s].  Luray, Va.: Shenandoah Natural History Association.  109 pp.

Environment and Environmental Activism in Appalachia, The.  2005.  Special issue [nine essays], Journal of Appalachian Studies 11, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 1-321.

Environmental Histories of the Mid-Atlantic.  2012.  Special issue, Pennsylvania History 79, no. 4 (Autumn): 327-570.  Contents: Introduction / Allen Dieterich-Ward and David C. Hsiung -- The changing nature of environmental history: an interview with Joel A. Tarr / Allen Dieterich-Ward -- Changes in the genre: a brief survey of early Mid-Atlantic environmental histories / Strother E. Roberts --  The rise of environmental tourism / Thomas A. Chambers --  Environmental history of the Susquehanna Valley around the time of European contact / April M. Beisaw --  The legacy of extraction: reading patterns and ethics in Pennsylvania’s landscape of energy / Brian Black and Marcy Ladson -- “Visit My Community”: the need to extend environmental justice to the countryside / Vagel Keller -- “Typically American”: trends in the history of environmental politics and policy in the Mid-Atlantic Region / James Longhurst --  Dirt in the city: urban environmental history in the Mid-Atlantic / Ellen Stroud --  Mind over matter: social justice, the body, and environmental history / Skylar Harris --  Farm boundaries as agroecological systems / Peggy Eppig --  New paths toward a history of Pennsylvania outdoor recreation / Silas Chamberlin -- Using the environmental history of the Commonwealth to enhance Pennsylvania and U.S. history courses / Charles Hardy --  From seed men to bird women: Pennsylvanians and the environment / Stephen H. Cutcliffe --  Resurrecting the story of the Passenger Pigeon in Pennsylvania / David Soll -- The teacher and the forest: the Pennsylvania Forestry Association, George Perkins Marsh, and the origins of conservation education / Peter Linehan --  “Archival Power” and the future of environmental movement history / James Longhurst --  How to make history matter: the Maurice K. Goddard Legacy Project / Brenda Barrett.

Faiers, Gregory E.  2000.  “Lightning Damage in Pennsylvania: 1959-1998” [Pa. incurs more damage than any other state; maps, tables].  Pennsylvania Geographer 37 (Fall/Winter): 141-158.

Fala, Bob.  2012.  Ramblin’ Outdoors: A Favorite Selection of Wildlife Stories from the Woods and Waters.  Parsons, W.Va.: McClain Printing Co.  186 pp.  Collection of Fala’s columns over 25 years, from the Logan [W.Va.] Banner.

Fallon, Katie.  2011.  Cerulean Blues: A Personal Search for a Vanishing Songbird.  Washington, D.C.: Ruka Press.  210 pp.  Migratory habitat vanishing due to deforestation, global warming, and mountaintop removal coal mining.

Feather, Carl E.  2006.  “Cabwaylingo State Forest: Bonnie Watts’ Playground” [Wayne Co.; built by the CCC in the 1930s].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 32, no. 3 (Fall): 56-61.  Sidebar, “Crum Brothers: Witnesses to Change” [83-year-old twins grew up on state forest land].

Feather, Carl E.  2007.  “Hobart Ellifritt and His Bluebird Motels” [b. 1921(?); placed and maintained nearly 4000 bluebird boxes along W.Va. highways].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 33, no. 1 (Spring): 62-63.

Feather, Carl E.  2008.  “Organ Cave: A World Within a World.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 34, no. 2 (Summer): 42-49.  Greenbrier County; “second longest cave system east of the Mississippi River.”

Feather, Carl.  2010.  “Building Blackwater: A Visit with Daniel ‘Boone’ Pase.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 36, no. 1 (Spring): 56-61.  Blackwater Falls State Park; 1955-1988 construction and maintenance; Thomas, W.Va.

Federman, Adam.  2012.  “What Killed Dunkard Creek?: Residents in Pennsylvania and West Virginia Say Fracking Is To Blame.”  Earth Island Journal 26, no. 4 (Winter).  3,200 words.  Aquatic poisoning of 65,000 fish, mussels, and salamanders in September, 2009.  http://www.earthisland.org/journal/index.php/eij/article/what_killed_dunkard_creek.

Feldman, David Lewis, and Lyndsay Moseley.  2003.  “Faith-Based Environmental Initiatives in Appalachia: Connecting Faith, Environmental Concern and Reform” [examines 20 faith-based organizations].  World Views: Environment, Culture, Religion 7 (November): 227-252.

Feldman, David Lewis.  2001.  “Going Thirsty? Appalachia Faces Water Supply Problems” [droughts, demand, laws].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 18 (Spring): 3-8.

Feldstein, Albert L.  2009.  The Great Cumberland Floods: Disaster in the Queen City [Cumberland, Md.; 1850s-1950s; photos].  Charleston, S.C.: History Press.  158 pp.

Fergus, Charles.  [1984] 2007.  The Wingless Crow: Essays from the “Thornapples” Column.  University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.  156 pp.  Previously published: Harrisburg: Pennsylvania Game Commission.  33 nature essays from Pennsylvania Game News magazine, 1970s-1990s.

First, Fred.  2005.  “On Eagle Wings.”  Nantahala: A Review of Writing and Photography in Appalachia 3, no. 1 (Winter): nonfiction section, 2100 words.  http://nantahalareview.org/issue3-1/non-fiction/First.htm.

First, Fred.  2006.  “Fragments from Floyd: Photos and Front Porch Musings From Floyd County, Virginia” [blog, photo-gallery, nature conservation].  Fred First, proprietor.  http://www.fragmentsfromfloyd.com/.

First, Fred.  2006.  Slow Road Home: A Blue Ridge Book of Days.  Floyd, Va.: Goose Creek Press.  216 pp.  Reflective essays by naturalist First; Floyd County, Va.; online photojournal at http://www.fragmentsfromfloyd.com/.

First, Fred.  2009.  What We Hold in Our Hands: A Slow Road Reader [seasonal observations, essays from a  Blue Ridge homestead].  Floyd, Va.: Goose Creek Press.  233 pp.  See also author’s blog, fragmentsfromfloyd.com.

Fluvial Processes in Small Southeastern Watersheds.  2010.  Special issue, Southeastern Geographer 50, no. 4 (Winter): 393-539.  Eight papers including five Appalachian: Morphology and channel evolution of small streams in the southern Blue Ridge Mountains of western North Carolina [upper Little Tennessee River basin] / D. Leigh -- In-Channel benches in small watersheds: examples from the southern Piedmont [nine sites in Ala., Ga., S.C., N.C.] / D. Royall, L. Davis, and D. Kimbrow -- Comparison of changes in runoff and channel cross-sectional area as a consequence of urbanization for three Chattahoochee River subbasins, Georgia, USA [1961-2005] / B. Smucygz, J. Clayton, and Z. Comarova -- Temporal variability of bank erosion in East Tennessee headwater streams [Little River] / C. Harden, K. Chartrand, and E. Henry -- Legacy Hg-Cu contamination of active stream sediments in the Gold Hill Mining District, North Carolina / R. Pavlowsky,  S. Lecce, G. Bassett, and D. Martin.

Ford, W. Mark, Michael A. Menzel, and Richard H. Odom.  2002.  “Elevation, Aspect, and Cove Size Effects on Southern Appalachian Salamanders” [Ga., N.C., S.C.].  Southeastern Naturalist 1 (December): 315-324.

Forests--The Way They Were [law to protect Savage River State Forest, Md.].  2002.  State Legislatures 28 (July): 15.

Fortney, Ronald H., James Rentch, Harold S. Adams, and Steven Stephenson.  1997.  “Vegetation of the Bluestone River Gorge in Southern West Virginia.”  In  Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 11-12, 1997, Glade Springs Resort, Daniels, West Virginia, 11-19.  Glen Jean, W.Va.: National Park Service.

Fraser, Rory, Steve Hollenhorst, and Alan Collins.  1999.  “Shades of Green: Public Opinion and the Economics of Environmental Protection in West Virginia” [tables].  In Inside West Virginia: Public Policy Perspectives for the 21st Century, ed. B. Keith and R. Althouse, 107-133.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.

Freinkel, Susan.  2007.  American Chestnut: The Life, Death, and Rebirth of a Perfect Tree. Berkeley: University of California Press.  284 pp.

Frick-Ruppert, Jennifer.  2010.  Mountain Nature: A Seasonal Natural History of the Southern Appalachians [forest and animal ecology].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  224 pp.

Fritsch, Albert J., and Paul Gallimore.  2007.  Healing Appalachia: Sustainable Living Through Appropriate Technology [details 30 earth-friendly technologies including: microhydropower, edible landscaping, wood heating, nontimber forest products, solar photovoltaics, retreat cabin sites, cordwood structures, yurts, regional heritage plants, composting toilets, cisterns and water catchments, food preservation].  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  435 pp.

Frome, Michael.  2002.  “Protecting the Public Options” [keynote address, Fontana Conservation Roundup, Fontana, N.C., 1975].  In Greenspeak: Fifty Years of Environmental Muckraking and Advocacy, by M. Frome, 66-80.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Frye, Bob.  2006.  Deer Wars: Science, Tradition, and the Battle Over Managing Whitetails in Pennsylvania.  Photographs by Gregory D. Sofranko.  State College: Pennsylvania State University Press.  310 pp.

Gaddy, L. L.  2000.  A Naturalist’s Guide to the Southern Blue Ridge Front: Linville Gorge, North Carolina, to Tallulah Gorge, Georgia [hiking; 49 natural areas]. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press.  190 pp.

Garland, Mark S., and John Anderton, illustrator.  1997.  Watching Nature: A Mid-Atlantic Natural History [Va., W.Va., and Middle Atlantic states].  Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press.  256 pp.

Garnette, Bill.  2000.  “A Spruce Knob Miracle” [1946 Navy pilot crash/rescue and other fatal wrecks on W.Va.’s highest peak].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 26 (Fall): 56-65.

Gensheimer, Lisa., with photographs by Ed Bernik.  2006.  Pennsylvania Wilds: Images from the Allegheny National Forest [coffee table book; photographs and local history].  Bradford, Pa.: Forest Press.  138 pp., plus CD containing maps.

Gibbons, J. Whitfield, and Michael E. Dorcas.  2005.  Snakes of the Southeast [field guide; 52 kinds of snakes].  A Wormsloe Foundation Nature Book.  University of Georgia Press.  253 pp.

Gilfillan, Merrill.  1997.  Burnt House to Paw Paw: Appalachian Notes [natural history; travels].  Profile Series, 3.  Stockbridge, Mass.: Hard Press, Inc.  132 pp.

Gray, Sam.  2004.  “I-26 and the Will of God” [N.C., Tenn.; poem-essay].  Nantahala: A Review of Writing and Photography in Appalachia 2, no. 2 (Winter-Spring):nonfiction section, 16 paras.  http://nantahalareview.org/issue2-2/non-fiction/GRAY.htm.

Green, Paul.  2005.  Paul Green’s Plant Book: An Alphabet of Flowers & Folklore.  Edited by Betsy Green Moyer and Ken Moore.  Photography by Betsy Green Moyer and Byrd Green Cornwell.  Chapel Hill, N.C.: Botanical Garden Foundation.  122 pp.

Greening of Appalachia.  2011.  Special issue, Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 1 (Summer): 1-63.

Greer, Jerry D., and Charles W. Maynard.  2009.  The Blue Ridge, Ancient and Majestic: A Celebration of the World’s Oldest Mountains.  Photography by Jerry D. Greer, essays by Charles W. Maynard.  Johnson City, Tenn.: Mountain Trail Press.  192 pp.  Oversize volume with full-page color photos.  Forewords by: Dan Brown, Former Superintendent, Blue Ridge Parkway; and Carl Silverstein, Executive Director, Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy.

Gregg, Sara M.  2010.  Managing the Mountains: Land Use Planning, the New Deal, and the Creation of a Federal Landscape in Appalachia [Va. and Vt.].  Yale Agrarian Studies Series.  New Haven: Yale University Press.  285 pp.  Contents: Introduction: Farms and forests: an Appalachian portrait -- 1: Origins -- A harvest of scarcity: self-sufficiency in the Blue Ridge Mountains -- Customs in common: community and agriculture in the Green Mountains -- Academics and partisans: federal land use planning, 1900-1933 -- 2: Projects -- Designing the Shenandoah National Park -- Cultivating the Vermont forest -- Reforming submarginal lands, 1933-1938 -- Epilogue: cellarholes and wilderness: the return of the Appalachian forest.

Haag, Kim H., and Stephen D. Porter.  1995.  Water-Quality Assessment of the Kentucky River Basin, Kentucky: Nutrients, Sediments, and Pesticides in Streams, 1987-90.  Water-Resources Investigations Report 94-4227.  Louisville: U.S. Geological Survey.

Hague, Richard.  2011.  “The Spring” [reflection; environmental stewardship].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 1 (Summer): 11-12.

Hall, Karen J.  2005.  The Blue Ridge Parkway [postcard history; dedicated 1940; Va., N.C., Tenn.].  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  128 pp.

Hall, Karen J.  2007.  Building the Blue Ridge Parkway [photo retrospective; 469 mi., begun 1935]. Charleston, S.C: Arcadia.  127 pp.

Hall, Karen Lynn Jones.  2005.  The Blue Ridge Parkway.  Postcard History Series.  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  128 pp.

Hallowell, Barbara G.  1998.  Mountain Year: A Southern Appalachian Nature Notebook [80 brief essays; month-by-month].  Winston-Salem: John F. Blair.  290 pp.

Halverson, Jeff.  2005.  “Queen of Rains: Hurricane Camille” [1969 flood-mudslide; Nelson Co., Va.; 158 deaths].  Weatherwise 58 (November/December): 24-29.

Haney, J. Christopher, David S. Lee, and Mark Wilbert.  2001.  “A Half-Century Comparison of Breeding Birds in the Southern Appalachians” [Unicoi Mts.; N.C., Tenn.].  The Condor 103 (May): 268-277.

Harmon, Paul J., Donna Ford-Werntz, and William N. Grafton, ed.  2006.  Checklist and Atlas of the Vascular Flora of West Virginia [93,000 specimens; maps; from dried, pressed plants in WVU Herbarium].  Elkins, W.Va.: West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Section.  381 pp.

Hart, Pete.  2000.  “Managing a Non-Traditional River Park” [W.Va.; New River Gorge National River (53 mi.); Gauley River National Recreation Area (26 mi.); Bluestone National Scenic River (10 mi.)].  In Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 15-16, 1999, Boone, North Carolina, 1-9.  Glen Jean, W.Va.: National Park Service.

Hart, William A., Jr.  1997.  “George Masa: The Best Mountaineer” [1881-1933; Japanese-American photographer/mapper of the Great Smoky Mountains].  In May We All Remember Well: A Journal of the History & Cultures of Western North Carolina, Vol. 1, ed. R. S. Brunk, 249-275.  Asheville, N.C.: Robert S. Brunk Auction Services Inc.

Hemmerly, Thomas E.  2000.  Appalachian Wildflowers [field guide; Ala. to Quebec].  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  344 pp.

Herrin, Roberta.  2011.  “Gold Is Not for All.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 1 (Summer): 2.  [Special issue,“The Greening of Appalachia”].  “Gold can be fickle....the promise of ‘gold’ lured the extractive industries to Appalachia....Spring greening invites us to live so respectfully in the now that all things are venerated and honored and protected.”

Hicks, Ray R.  2007.  Trees of West Virginia [identification guidebook].  Drawings by Bruce Lyndon Cunningham.  Nacogdoches, Tex.: Bruce Lyndon Cunningham Productions (www.forester-artist.com).  92 pp.

Hill, Dean.  2004.  Spirit of Appalachian Kentucky: A Photographic Journey [seasonal nature photography].  West Liberty, Ky.: Mortgage the Farm.  112 pp.

Hill, Dean.  2008.  Appalachia, Spirit of the Seasons: A Continuing Photographic Journey [123 photographs].  Foreword by Silas House.  West Liberty, Ky.: Mortgage the Farm.  144 pp.

Holland, Dorothy.  2003.  “Multiple Identities in Practice: On the Dilemmas of Being a Hunter and an Environmentalist in the U.S.” [hunters faced with loss of commons land side with environmentalists].  Focaal - European Journal of Anthropology 42: 31-49.

Hood, Mary A.  2008.  “Conhocton River: A New York State of Mind.”  In RiverTime: Ecotravel on the World’s Rivers, by M. Hood, 51-60.  Albany: State University of New York Press.

Hood, Mary A.  2008.  “Cumberland River: Magnolias and Other Rare Plants of the Appalachians” [Ky.; forest trails].  In RiverTime: Ecotravel on the World’s Rivers, by M. Hood, 41-50.  Albany: State University of New York Press.

Hood, Mary A.  2008.  “Ellijay River: Applesauce” [North Ga.].  In RiverTime: Ecotravel on the World’s Rivers, by M. Hood, 75-79.  Albany: State University of New York Press.

Hopey, Don.  2009.  “Sudden Death of Ecosystem Ravages Long Creek” [Dunkard Creek, Blacksville, W.Va.].  Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 20 September, 1(A).  1,192 words, with graphic of the 150,000 acre W.Va./Pa. watershed.  “Everything is being killed: 161 aquatic species have died,” in this tributary of the Monongahela River.  Possible polluters are nearby coal mining and Marcellus Shale gas drilling operations.  http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/09263/999458-113.stm?cmpid=news.xml.

Hopkins, Bruce.  1996.  Smithsonian Guides to Natural America: Central Appalachia -- West Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee.  Photography by Willard Clay and Kathy Clay.  Washington: Smithsonian Books.  286 pp.

Horan, Jack.  1997.  Where Nature Reigns: The Wilderness Areas of the Southern Appalachians.  Asheboro, N.C.: Down Home Press.  280 pp.

Horn, Dennis, David Duhl, Thomas E. Hemmerly, and Tavia Cathcart.  2005.  Wildflowers of Tennessee, the Ohio Valley, and the Southern Appalachians: The Official Field Guide of the Tennessee Native Plant Society [flora of 16 states; 1250 species; 800 color photos].  Auburn, Wash.: Lone Pine.  496 pp.

Horn, Dennis, David Duhl, Thomas E. Hemmerly, and Tavia Cathcart, ed.  2005.  Wildflowers of Tennessee, the Ohio Valley, and the Southern Appalachians: The Official Field Guide of the Tennessee Native Plant Society.  Auburn, Wash.: Lone Pine Publishing.  496 pp.

Horning, Audrey J.  2000.  “Shenandoah’s Secret History” [settlement sites explored in Nicholson, Corbin, and Weakley hollows -- displaced by 1930s national park; Va.].  Archaeology 53 (January/February): 44-51.

Houk, Rose.  2003.  Great Smoky Mountains National Park: The Range of Life [pictorial overview].  Gatlinburg, Tenn.: Great Smoky Mountains Association.  47 pp.

House, Silas.  2005.  “A Place of Noble Trees” [Dale Hollow Lake, Ky.-Tenn.].  In Of Woods and Waters: A Kentucky Outdoors Reader, 120-131.  Lexington, Ky.: University Press of Kentucky.

Howard, Jason.  2009.  We All Live Downstream: Writing About Mountaintop Removal. Louisville, Ky.: MotesBooks.  298 pp.  Writers in this collection include Robert F. Kennedy Jr., Wendell Berry, Earl Hamner, Ashley Judd, Silas House, Denise Giardina, Erik Reece, Bobbie Ann Mason, Bob Edwards, Penny Loeb, Hal Crowther, Jean Ritchie, Terry Tempest Williams, Jeff Biggers, Ann Pancake, George Ella Lyon, and more.

Howell, Benita J.  2002.  “Appalachian Culture and Environmental Planning: Expanding the Role of the Cultural Sciences.”  In Culture, Environment, and Conservation in the Appalachian South, ed. B. Howell, 1-16.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Howell, Benita J., ed.  2002.  Culture, Environment, and Conservation in the Appalachian South [11 case studies].  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.  203 pp.

Hubbs, Hal, Charles Maynard, and David Morris.  2006.  Waterfalls of the Smokies [pocket guidebook; 40 falls; Tenn., N.C.].  2nd ed.  Gatlinburg, Tenn.: Great Smoky Mountains Association.  206 pp.

Hufford, Mary.  1995.  “Stalking the Mother Forest: Voices Beneath the Canopy” [Raleigh Co., W.Va.].  Folklife Center News (Library of Congress) 17, no. 3 (Summer): 10-18, 20.  http://www.loc.gov/folklife/news/index.html.

Hufford, Mary.  1997.  “American Ginseng and the Idea of the Commons”  [”a vernacular cultural domain that transcends state boundaries”; Southern W.Va.].  Folklife Center News (Library of Congress) 19 no. 1 and 2 (Winter-Spring): 1-18.  http://www.loc.gov/folklife/news/index.html.

Hufford, Mary.  1998.  “Tending the Commons: Ramp Suppers, Biodiversity, and the Integrity of ‘The Mountains’” [Big Coal River, W.Va.].  Folklife Center News (Library of Congress) 20, no. 4 (Fall): 3-11.  http://www.loc.gov/folklife/news/index.html.

Hufford, Mary.  1998.  “Weathering the Storm: Cultural Survival in an Appalachian Valley” [Coal River, W.Va.].  In An Appalachian Tragedy: Air Pollution and Tree Death in the Eastern Forests of North America,  ed. H. Ayers, J. Hager, and C. E. Little, 146-159.  San Francisco: Sierra Club Books.

Hufford, Mary.  1999.  “Working in the Cracks: Public Space, Ecological Crisis, and the Folklorist” [W.Va.; New River Gorge and Coal River; strip mining].  Journal of Folklore Research 36 (May-December): 157-167.

Hufford, Mary.  2001.  “Tending the Commons: West Virginia Folklife Project Goes Online.”  Folklife Center News (Library of Congress) 23, no. 1 (Winter): 10-12.  http://www.loc.gov/folklife/news/index.html.  http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/cmnshtml/cmnshome.html.

Hufford, Mary.  2002.  “Interrupting the Monologue: Folklore, Ethnography, and Critical Regionalism” [with comments on “Appalachia as a Global Region: Toward Critical Regionalism and Civic Professionalism” by Herbert Reid and Betsy Taylor, Journal of Appalachian Studies 8 (Spring 2002): 9-32].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 8 (Spring 2002): 62-78.

Hufford, Mary.  2002.  “Reclaiming the Commons: Narratives of Progress, Preservation, and Ginseng” [W.Va.].  In Culture, Environment, and Conservation in the Appalachian South, ed. B. Howell, 100-120.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Hufford, Mary.  2006.  “Molly Mooching on Bradley Mountain: The Aesthetic Ecology of Appalachian Morels.”  Gastronomica 6, no. 2 (Spring): 49-56.  Short cultural treatise on morel mushroom history, hunting, and preparation in southern W.Va.

Hugo, Nancy Ross, and Jeff Kirwan.  2008.  Remarkable Trees of Virginia.  Photography by Robert Llewellyn.  Earlysville, Va.: Albemarle Books.  205 pp.  Contents: Old trees -- Historic trees -- Champion trees -- Community trees -- Unique trees -- Fine specimens -- Noteworthy species -- Mighty oaks -- Tree places.

Hullihen Williams Moore.  2004.  Shenandoah: Views of Our National Park [essays; 51 duotone prints].  Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.  89 pp.

Humphries, W. Jeffrey.  2007.  “Diurnal Seasonal Activity of Cryptobranchus alleganiensis (Hellbender) in North Carolina” [giant salamander; Transylvania Co.].  Southeastern Naturalist 6, no. 1 (March): 135-140.

Hunt, James B.  2012.  Restless Fires: Young John Muir’s Thousand-Mile Walk to the Gulf in 1867/68.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  235 pp.  Indiana to Florida, traversing the Appalachian Mountains in Tennessee and Georgia.

Hyde, Arnout, Jr., and Ken Sullivan.  1994.  The Potomac: A  Nation's River.  Charleston, WV: Cannon Graphics.  127 pp.

Jackson, Dot.  2011.  “The Voice of the Turtle Returns, Sweet and Clear.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 1 (Summer): 7-9.  Poisonous copper mining and smelting in southeastern Tennessee’s denuded Copper Basin, where Tenn., Ga. and N.C. state lines converge, ceased in 1987 and the cleanup began.

Jackson, Laura E.  1989.  Mountain Treasures at Risk: The Future of the Southern Appalachian National Forests.  Washington, D.C.: The Wilderness Society.  50 pp., plus appendices (11 pp.).

Jones, Adam.  2004.  Great Smoky Mountains: Simply Beautiful [oversize color photos].  Photography by Adam Jones, text by Steve Kemp.  Helena, Mont.: Farcountry Press.  119 pp.

Jones, Robert Emmet, Mark J. Fly, and H. Ken Cordell.  1999.  “How Green Is My Valley?: Tracking Rural and Urban Environmentalism in the Southern Appalachian Ecoregion” [1239 telephone interviews].  Rural Sociology 64 (September): 482-499.

Jones, Ronald L.  2005.  Plant Life of Kentucky: An Illustrated Guide to the Vascular Flora [three regions: Appalachian Plateau, Interior Low Plateau, Mississippi Embayment].  With the assistance of John W. Thieret and Charles J. Lapham.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  834 pp.

Joslin, Michael.  2000.  Appalachian Bounty: Nature’s Gifts from the Mountains: A Collection of Essays and Photographs.  Johnson City, Tenn.: Overmountain Press.  229 pp.

Joslin, Michael.  2007.  “Wild and Elusive: The Appalachian ‘Painter’” [cougars; sightings].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 23, no. 2 (Fall/Winter): 32-37.

Joslin, Michael.  2008.  “The Man Who Saved a Mountain.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 24, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 17-21.  Hugh Morton (d. 2006), steward of Grandfather Mountain, N.C.

Joslin, Michael.  2010.  “High Time for Change.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 26, no. 1 (Summer): 35-36.  Rehabilitating raptors wantonly targeted by humans, at Blue Ridge Wildlife Institute at Lees-McRae College, Banner Elk, N.C.

Joslin, Michael.  2011.  “New Hope for the American Chestnut.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 1 (Summer): 4-6.  History, personal stories, and research on blight resistance.

Joslin, Michael.  2011.  “Who Keeps Our Rivers Flowing?”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 26, no. 2 (Winter): 24-27.  Litter, unchecked development, sedimentation: Elk and Watauga Rivers, western N.C.; Waterkeeper Alliance.

Judd, Richard William.  2009.  The Untilled Garden: Natural History and the Spirit of Conservation in America, 1740-1840 [Appalachian to Mississippi frontier].New York: Cambridge University Press.  318 pp.

Jurgelski, William M.  2008.  “Burning Seasons, Burning Bans: Fire in the Southern Appalachian Mountains, 1750-2000.”  Appalachian Journal 35, no. 3 (Spring): 170-217.  Forest fires, forestry practices, and human impact; extensive bibliographic references.

Justice, William S., C. Ritchie Bell, and Anne H. Lindsey.  2005.  Wild Flowers of North Carolina.  2nd ed.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  352 pp.

Kaiser, Jocelyn.  1999.  “Great Smokies Species Census Under Way.”  Science, 11 June, 1747-1748.

Kight, Caitlin.  2010.  “High in Flight: Avian Appalachia.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 26, no. 1 (Summer): 37-39.  Remarkable underrated birding opportunities in the region.

Kirby, Jack Temple.  2006.  Mockingbird Song: Ecological Landscapes of the South [human ecology; nine subregions are woven into this narrative; cf. recent studies by Donald E. Davis, Benita Howell, Margaret Lynn Brown, Donald Pierce, Wendell Berry].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  361 pp.

Kirkland, Joel.  2010.  “Concerns Spread Over Environmental Costs of Producing Shale Gas” [Marcellus Shale gas drilling; Pa., W.Va.].  New York Times, 9 July: Energy & Environment.  2514 words. http://www.nytimes.com/cwire/2010/07/09/09climatewire-concerns-spread-over-environmental-costs-of-36415.html.

Knott, John R.  2002.  “Into the Woods with Wendell Berry.”  Chap. 5 in Imagining Wild America, 133-161.  Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Lafon, Charles W.  2000.  “Spatial Patterns of Ice Storm Occurrence in the New River Valley” [county outline maps].  In Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 15-16, 1999, Boone, North Carolina, 68-77.  Glen Jean, W.Va.: National Park Service.

Lane, John, and Gerald Thurmond, ed.  1999.  The Woods Stretched for Miles: New Nature Writing from the South [18 essays: five Appalachian].  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  255 pp.

Lane, John.  2002.  Waist Deep in Black Water [personal accounts; Spartanburg, S.C.].  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  187 pp.

Lane, John.  2004.  “The Myth of the Chattooga: A Personal History” [excerpt from Chattooga: Descending into the Myth of Deliverance River (University of Georgia Press, 2004)].  Nantahala: A Review of Writing and Photography in Appalachia 2, no. 2 (Winter-Spring):nonfiction section, 75 paras.  http://nantahalareview.org/issue2-2/non-fiction/LANE.htm.

Lane, John.  2004.  Chattooga: Descending into the Myth of Deliverance River [Ga.-S.C. border; Deliverance, 1970 novel by James Dickey and 1972 film].  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  210 pp.

Lecce, Scott A.  2000.  “Seasonality of Flooding in North Carolina” [maps; figures].  Southeastern Geographer 40 (November): 168-175.

Lefohn, Allen S., William Jackson, and Douglas S. Shadwick.  1997.  “Effect of Surface Ozone Exposures on Vegetation Grown in the Southern Appalachian Mountains: Identification of Possible Areas of Concern.”  Atmospheric Environment (Oxford, England) 31 (June): 1695-1708.

Leland, John.  2010.  Learning the Valley: Excursions into the Shenandoah Valley [25 short essays].  Columbia: University of South Carolina Press.  134 pp.  Contents: Sugar Creek -- Rock crystals -- The Shenandoah sea -- Caves -- Rock castles -- The Natural Bridge -- Stone walls -- Geological segregation -- Massanutten -- Forest communities -- Cedars -- Maple syrup -- Poison ivy -- Sassafras -- Briar patch -- Hedges -- Vegetable armature -- Mosquitoes -- Spring ephemerals -- Flying frass -- My Civil War -- Migration -- Running the river -- Hay bales -- Sexual swarms.

Lembke, Janet.  2004.  Skinny Dipping: And Other Immersions in Water, Myth, and Being Human [western Va.; personal essays].  Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.  177 pp.

Leonard, James, and Kevin Law.  2012.  “Spatial and Temporal Variations in West Virginia’s Precipitation, 1931–2000.”  Southeastern Geographer 52, no. 1 (Spring): 5-19.  Maps, tables.

Leutze, Jay Erskine.  2012.  Stand Up That Mountain: The Battle to Save One Small Community in the Wilderness Along the Appalachian Trail.  New York: Scribner.  387 pp.  “This is the true story of an outdoorsman living alone in Western North Carolina who teams up with his neighbors and environmental lawyers to save a treasured mountain peak from the mining company.”

Lewis, Jonathon F.  2004.  Carter Caves State Resort Park: A Living History [Carter Co., Ky.].  Charleston, W.Va.: Chapman Printing.  94 pp.

Lhotka, Laura, Conner Bailey, and Mark Dubois.  2008.  “Ideologically Structured Information Exchange among Environmental Groups” [Ala.].  Rural Sociology 73, no. 2 (June): 230-249.  Based on interviews with leaders of 136 groups including the Alabama Department of Environmental Management, and the Alabama Rivers Coalition.

Liftig, Inez Fugate.  2001.  “Lessons from Ganderbill Holler” [1950s Ky.; award-winning science teacher remembers girlhood forests and streams as her first classroom].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 18 (Spring): 13-17.

Linzey, Donald W.  2000.  “Cougars in the Southern Appalachians” [Va.].  In Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 15-16, 1999, Boone, North Carolina, 10-14.  Glen Jean, W.Va.: National Park Service.

Linzey, Donald W.  2008.  A Natural History Guide to Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  292 pp.

Lockman, Felix J., Francis Dunnington Ghigo, and Dana Scott Balser, ed.  2007.  But It Was Fun: The First Forty Years of Radio Astronomy at Green Bank [giant radio telescopes].  Green Bank, W.Va.: National Radio Astronomy Observatory.  583 pp.

Loucks, Orie.  1998.  “In Changing Forests, A Search for Answers” [southern W.Va.; Ohio Valley].  In An Appalachian Tragedy: Air Pollution and Tree Death in the Eastern Forests of North America,  ed. H. Ayers, J. Hager, and C. E. Little, 84-97.  San Francisco: Sierra Club Books.

Luffman, Ingrid E.  2010.  “Wake-up Call in East Tennessee? Correlating Flood Losses to National Flood Insurance Program Enrollment (1978-2006).”  Southeastern Geographer 50, no. 3 (Fall): 305-322.  Chattanooga, Elizabethton, and Pigeon Forge.

Maehr, David.  2001.  “Restoring the Large Mammal Fauna in the East: What Follows the Elk?  Wild Earth 11 (Spring): 50-53.

Maher, Neil M.  2008.  Nature’s New Deal: The Civilian Conservation Corps and the Roots of the American Environmental Movement [1933-  ].  New York: Oxford University Press.  316 pp.

Mannion, Elgin.  2002.  “What’s in a Name? Methodological Changes in Environmental Risk Assessment” [politics, EPA, regulatory reform].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 8 (Fall): 309-331.

Markham, Doug.  1997.  Boxes, Rockets, and Pens: A History of Wildlife Recovery in Tennessee.  Outdoor Tennessee Series.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  144 pp.; 16 pp. of plates.

Marshall, Suzanne.  2002.  “Lord, We’re Just Trying to Save Your Water”: Environmental Activism and Dissent in the Appalachian South [Ga., Ala., N.C.].  Southern Dissent.  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.  384 pp.

Mason, Bobbie Ann.  2006.  “Pick Your Poison” [Op-Ed piece on nation’s use of Ky. as storage site for variety of toxic wastes].  New York Times, 29 October, 13 (sec. 4).  567 words.

Mathews, Louise, and Carol Harden.  1999.  “150 Years of Environmental Degradation and Reclamation in the Copper Basin, Tennessee” [Polk Co.; treeless landscape; copper mining].  Southeastern Geographer 39 (May): 1-21.

Matthews, Larry E.  2008.  Caves of Knoxville and the Great Smoky Mountains. Huntsville, Ala.: National Speleological Society.  296 pp. Contents: Cherokee Caverns -- English Cave -- Gap Cave -- Indian Cave -- Meredith Cave -- New Mammoth Cave -- Alum Cave -- Forbidden Caverns -- Gregorys Cave -- The Lost Sea -- Tuckaleechee Caverns -- Appalachian Caverns -- Bristol Caverns -- Morrill Cave.

Matthews, Larry E., and Bill Walter.  2010.  Blue Spring Cave [White Co., Ala.].  Huntsville, Ala: National Speleological Society.  340 pp.  Well-documented account of 35 miles of passages explored since 1988 in the “longest known cave in Tennessee.”  Numerous photos.

Mayfield, Michael W., and John T. Morgan.  2005.  “The ‘Oldest River’ as an Appalachian Popular Region” [New River].  The Journal of Geography 104, no. 2 (March-April): 59-64.

Maynard, Charles W.  2004.  The Appalachians [elementary audience, ages 9-12].  Great Mountain Ranges of the World.  New York: PowerKids Press.  24 pp.

Maynard, Charles W.  2008.  Going to Great Smoky Mountains National Park [juvenile literature; natural history].  Helena, Mont.: Farcountry Press.  48 pp.

Maysilles, Duncan.  2011.  Ducktown Smoke: The Fight Over One of the South’s Greatest Environmental Disasters [copper smelting; Tenn.].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  333 pp.  Contents: Introduction: the view from the mountain -- The setting, the Cherokees, and the first era of Ducktown mining, 1843-1878 -- The revival of Ducktown mining and the first smoke suits, 1890-1903 -- The farmers and the copper companies wage battle in the Tennessee courts -- Georgia enters the fray -- The Ducktown desert and Georgia’s first smoke suit -- Will Shippen, forestry, and Georgia’s second smoke suit, 1905-1907 -- Attorney general Hart, the National Farmers Union, and the search for a remedy, 1907-1910 -- The smoke injunction and the great war, 1914-1918 -- Power dams, whitewater rafting, and the reclamation of the Ducktown desert, 1916-2010 -- Epilogue: the view from the mountain.

McAlexander, Hubert Horton.  2008.  Strawberry Plains Audubon Center: Four Centuries of a Mississippi Landscape.  Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.  181 pp.  Marshall County wildlife center; multigenerational history of a 2,500-acre, bequeathed plantation.

McDearman, Karen M., and Robert L. Izlar.  2006.  “Shenandoah Valley” [history; northern Va.].  In The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, Vol. 8: Environment, ed. M. Melosi, 270-272.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

McGraw, James B., and Mary Ann Furedi.  2005.  “Deer Browsing and Population Viability of a Forest Understory Plant” [ginseng; five-year survey; W.Va.].  Science, 11 February: 920-922.  See also related story by Erik Stokstad, 827.

McKinney, Gordon B.  2005.  “The Fractured Land of the Sky: The Image of Western North Carolina during the 1986 Nuclear Waste Controversy” [tourism; land development].  North Carolina Historical Review 82, no. 3: 326-346.

McSpirit, Stephanie, Lynne Faltraco, and Conner Bailey, ed.  2012.  Confronting Ecological Crisis in Appalachia and the South: University and Community Partnerships [14 essays].  Foreword by Scott J. Peters.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  269 pp.  Contents: Introduction: Forging partnerships between communities and academic activists / Stephanie McSpirit, Lynne Faltraco, and Conner Bailey -- Confessions of the parasitic researcher to the man in the cowboy hat / Sherry Cable -- What difference did it make? The Appalachian Land Ownership Study after twenty-five years / Shaunna L. Scott -- Participatory action research: combating the poisoning of Dayhoit, Harlan County / Roy Silver -- The Martin County project: students, faculty, and citizens research the effects of a technological disaster / Stephanie McSpirit, and others -- Unsuitable: the fight to save Black Mountain, 1998-1999 / Robert Gipe -- Building partnerships to challenge Chip Mills: citizen activists find academic allies / Lynne Faltraco and Conner Bailey -- Environmental justice from the roots: Tillery, North Carolina / Mansoureh Tajik -- The incineration of chemical weapons in Anniston, Alabama: the march for environmental justice / Suzanne Marshall, Rufus Kinney, and Antoinnette Hudson -- Expertise and alliances: how Kentuckians transformed the U.S. chemical weapons disposal program / Robert Futrell and Dick Futrell -- Headwaters: a student-faculty participatory research project in Eastern Kentucky / Alan Banks, Alice Jones, and Anne Blakeney -- Social theory, Appalachian studies, and the challenge of global regions: the UK Rockefeller Humanities Fellowship Program, 2001-2005 / Betsy Taylor, Lynne Faltraco, and Ana Isla -- Conclusion: Reflections on public scholarship in Appalachia and the South / Stephanie McSpirit, Lynne Faltraco, and Conner Bailey.

Medina, Barbara, and Victor Medina.  2002.  Central Appalachian Wildflowers: A Field Guide to Common Wildflowers of the Central Appalachian Mountains, including Shenandoah National Park, the Catskill Mountains, and the Berkshire Mountains.  Guilford, Conn.: Falcon.  183 pp.

Medina, Barbara F., and Victor Medina.  2002.  Southern Appalachian Wildflowers: A Field Guide to Common Wildflowers of the Southern Appalachian Mountains, Including Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the Blue Ridge Parkway, and the Chattahoochee National Forest.  Guilford, Conn.: Falcon.  215 pp.

Melosi, Martin, ed.  2007.  Environment.  Vol. 8 of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  293 pp.

Messick, Robert.  2001.  “Stalking Ancient Forests in the Southern Appalachians” [logging]. Wild Earth 11 (Spring): 72-75.

Michael, Edwin Daryl.  2002.  A Valley Called Canaan: 1885-2002 [historical novel; Canaan Valley, W.Va., natural history].  Parsons, W.Va.: McClain Printing Company.  223 pp.

Michaels, Art.  2003.  Pennsylvania Overlooks: A Guide for Sightseers and Outdoor People [47 park and forest vistas].  State College: Pennsylvania State University Press.  240 pp.

Miller, Brian T., and Joyce L. Miller.  2005.  “Prevalence of Physical Abnormalities in Eastern Hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis alleganiensis) Populations of Middle Tennessee” [large salamanders, 12-29 inches long;  tributaries of the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers].  Southeastern Naturalist 4, no. 3: 513-520.

Miller, Darren A.  2003.  “Species Diversity, Reproduction, and Sex Ratios of Bats in Managed Pine Forest Landscapes of Mississippi.”  Southeastern Naturalist 2, no. 1: 59-72.

Miller, E. Willard, ed.  1995.  A Geography of Pennsylvania.  University Park: Pennsylvania State University.  406 pp.

Miller, James H., and Karl V. Miller.  2005.  Forest Plants of the Southeast and Their Wildlife Uses [field guide; 330 species].  Rev. ed.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  454 pp.

Milnes, Gerald.  2009.  “The Natural World: Bernard Cyrus.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 35, no. 1 (Spring): 10-17.  Wayne County self-taught botanist, old-time musician and instrument builder, and storyteller.  Sidebar showcases Cyrus’s photographs of West Virginia wild orchids, 18-19.

Minick, Jim.  1997.  “Fingerprint” [journal entries: 1994 ice storm, loggers and logging].  In  Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 11-12, 1997, Glade Springs Resort, Daniels, West Virginia, 120-125.  Glen Jean, W.Va.: National Park Service.

Minick, Jim.  2005.  Finding a Clear Path [67 short ecological essays and reflections].  Morgantown, W.Va.: Vandalia Press.  277 pp.

Minteer, Ben A.  2001.  “Wilderness and the Wise Province: Benton MacKaye’s Pragmatic Vision.” Philosophy and Geography 4 (no. 2): 185-202.

Mitchell, Michael S., and Roger A. Powell.  2003.  “Response of Black Bears to Forest Management in the Southern Appalachian Mountains.”  Journal of Wildlife Management 67 (October): 692-705.

Mitchell, Michael S., John W. Zimmerman, and Roger A. Powell.  2002.  “Test of a Habitat Suitability Index for Black Bears in the Southern Appalachians.”  Wildlife Society Bulletin 30 (Fall): 794-808.

Mohlenbrock, Robert H.  1999.  “Bountiful Barrens” [Kate’s Mountain, Greenbrier State Forest, W.Va.; rare plants, hiking trails, 1903 discovery].  Natural History 108 (October): 12-15.

Mohlenbrock, Robert H.  1999.  “Bountiful Barrens” [Kate’s Mountain, Greenbrier State Forest, W.Va.; rare plants, hiking trails, 1903 discovery].  Natural History 108 (October): 12-15.

Mohlenbrock, Robert H.  2002.  “Through the Stone Door” [Savage Gulf State Natural Area; Cumberland Plateau canyons, Tenn.].  Natural History 111 (November): 66-67.

Mohlenbrock, Robert H.  2006.  “Green Fingers” [N.Y.; Finger Lakes National Forest, Schuyler Co.].  Natural History 115, no. 3 (April): 82-83.

Mohlenbrock, Robert H.  2006.  “Last Stands” [Pa.; Allegheny National Forest; Heart’s Content Scenic Area; insect and disease threats].  Natural History 115, no. 9 (November): 60-61.

Mohlenbrock, Robert H.  2006.  “Virginia Is for Hikers” [Massanutten Mountain, George Washington National Forest].  Natural History 115, no. 4 (May): 56-57.

Mohlenbrock, Robert H.  2009.  “The Magic Rock Garden.”  Natural History 118, no. 3 (April): 36-37.  Rare species that grow in glades along the Little Cahaba River in Bibb County, Alabama.

Mohlenbrock, Robert H.  2011.  “Penn’s Woods” [Pocono Mountains].  Natural History 119, no. 10 (November): 30-32.  Four-county area of northeastern Pennsylvania; natural habitats; visitor information.

Mohlenbrock, Robert H.  2011.  “Washington’s Park Crossing the Delaware” [northeastern Pa.].  Natural History 119, no. 6 (June): 36-37.  Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area; Dingmans Falls.

Mohlenbrock, Robert H.  2012.  “Knob Hill” [W.Va.].  Natural History 120, no. 8 (September-October): 40-41.  Unusual plant habitats on 34-mile-long North Fork Mountain in the Monongahela National Forest.

Monfredo, William.  2000.  “Significant Tornado Activity in Southwestern Pennsylvania” [historically high risk; tables].  Pennsylvania Geographer 37 (Fall/Winter): 43-63.

Montrie, Chad.  2000.  “Expedient Environmentalism: Opposition to Coal Surface Mining in Appalachia and the United Mine Workers of America, 1945-1977.”  Environmental History 5 (January): 75-98.

Moore, Harry L.  1994.  A Geologic Trip Across Tennessee By Interstate 40.  Outdoor Tennessee Series.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  339 pp.

Moore, Wayne.  1995.  “Damming the Valley” [TVA].  Special Section: Eminent Domain.  Southern Exposure 23 (Summer): 30-36.

Morrone, Michele, and Geoffrey L. Buckley, ed.  2011.  Mountains of Injustice: Social and Environmental Justice in Appalachia.  Foreword by Donald Edward Davis.  Athens: Ohio University Press.  198 pp.  Contents: Introduction: Environmental justice and Appalachia / Michele Morrone and Geoffrey L. Buckley -- The theoretical roots and sociology of environmental justice in Appalachia / Stephen J. Scanlan -- A legacy of extraction: ethics in the energy landscape of Appalachia / Brian Black -- Pollution or poverty: the dilemma of industry in Appalachia / Nancy Irwin Maxwell -- “We mean to stop them, one way or another”: coal, power, and the fight against strip mining in Appalachia / Chad Montrie -- Commons environmentalism mobilized: the Western North Carolina alliance and the Cut the Clearcutting! Campaign / Kathryn Newfont -- Injustice in the handling of nuclear weapons waste: the case of David Witherspoon, Inc. / John Nolt -- Housewives from hell: perspectives on environmental justice and facility siting / Michele Morrone and Wren Kruse -- Stories about mountaintop removal in the Appalachian coalfields / Geoffrey L. Buckley and Laura Allen -- Afterword: An American sacrifice zone / Jedediah S. Purdy.

Nash, Steve.  1999.  Blue Ridge 2020: An Owner’s Manual [ecology; environmental risks].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  211 pp.

Nava, Margaret M.  2011.  “How Green Are Our Mountains?”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 1 (Summer): 16-18.  Nineteen-sixties communes (Twin Oaks, The Farm, New Vrindaban) and today’s legacy: Earthhaven Ecovillage (N.C.), the Foundation for Global Sustainability (Knoxville, Tenn.), and Berea College’s Ecovillage (Ky.).

Ness, Erik.  2003.  “The Path Taken: Benton MacKaye Brought Us the Appalachian Trail—and New Ways to Look at the American Landscape.”  Historic Preservation: Quarterly of the National Council for Historic Sites and Buildings 55 (July-August): 40-43.

New  River Symposium.  1997.  Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 11-12, 1997, Glade Springs Resort, Daniels, W.Va. [13 papers].  Jointly sponsored by New River Gorge National River (National Park Service), and West Virginia Division of Culture and History.  Published by Eastern National Park & Monument Association, c/o New River Gorge National Park, P.O. Box 246, Glen Jean, W.Va. 25846.  125 pp.

New River Symposium.  2000.  Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 15-16, 1999, Boone, North Carolina. [14 papers].  Glen Jean, W.Va.: National Park Service.  123 pp.

Newfont, Kathryn.  1999.  “Grassroots Environmentalism: Origins of the Western North Carolina Alliance” [1982-- ].  Appalachian Journal 27 (Fall): 46-61.

Newfont, Kathryn.  2000.  Review essay of Where There Are Mountains: An Environmental History of the Southern Appalachians, by Donald Edward Davis (University of Georgia Press, 2000).  Appalachian Journal 28 (Fall): 130-136.

Newfont, Kathryn.  2012.  Blue Ridge Commons: Environmental Activism and Forest History in Western North Carolina.  Environmental History and the American South series.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  369 pp.  Weatherford Award winner for nonfiction.  Contents: Foreword / by Paul S. Sutter | “The custom of our country”: the Appalachian forest commons | Response to devastation: organizing forests in the southern Appalachians | Plenty of trouble: creating federal forests in the Blue Ridge | De jure commons: national forests and Blue Ridge neighbors | Contested forests: commons, clearcutting, and wilderness | Wilderness as commons enclosure: RARE II opposition | Wilderness as commons defense: the southern Nantahala | Mobilizing commons defense: “oil fever” threatens the forests | Clearcutting returns: timber enclosure threatens the forests | Commons environmentalism mobilized: Western North Carolina Alliance’s Cut the Clearcutting! campaign | Conclusion: An American commons in the Blue Ridge | Afterword: A call to commons.

Nicholson, Charles P.  1997.  Atlas of the Breeding Birds of Tennessee [170 species]. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  426 pp.

Nickens, T. Edward.  2002.  “Saving Our Bald Spots” [mountain balds; species].  Audubon 104 (September): 24-29.

Nickens, T. Edward.  2003.  “Jocassee’s Gems” [Jocassee Gorge biodiversity; N.C./S.C.].  National Wildlife 41 (August/September): 39-46.

Nieman, Thomas J., and Zina R. Merkin.  1995.  “Wildlife Management, Surface Mining, and Regional Planning.”  Growth and Change 26 (Summer): 405-424.

Noblitt, Phil.  1994.  “The Blue Ridge Parkway and Myths of the  Pioneer.”  Appalachian Journal 21 (Summer): 394-409.

Nolt, John.  2005.  A Land Imperiled: The Declining Health of the Southern Appalachian Bioregion [history, air, water, biota, urbanization, food, energy, waste, transportation, future prospects, sustainability models].  Outdoor Tennessee Series.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  435 pp.

Nourse, Hugh, and Carol Nourse.  2000.  Wildflowers of Georgia [85 color photos].  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  120 pp.

Nourse, Hugh O., and Carol Nourse.  2007.  Favorite Wildflower Walks in Georgia [20 guided walks; color photos; Cumberland Plateau/Ridge and Valley, Blue Ridge, Piedmont, Coastal Plain].  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  190 pp.

Ogard, Paulette Haywood.  2010.  Butterflies of Alabama: Glimpses into Their Lives [84 species].  Photographs by Sara Bright.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  486 pp.  Profusely illustrated; county outline maps; glossary; resources.

Olson, Ted.  2003.  “In the Public Interest?: The Social and Cultural Impact of the Blue Ridge Parkway, a Depression-Era Appalachian ‘Public Works’ Project.”  In The New Deal and Beyond: Social Welfare in the South since 1930, ed. E. Green, 100-115.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Palmer, Tim.  1996.  “Chapter Two: Appalachian Rivers of Green.”  In America By Rivers, 45-79.  Washington, D.C.: Island Press.

Palmer-Ball, Brainard L., Jr.  1996.  The Kentucky Breeding Bird Atlas.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  384 pp.

Pasquill, Robert G.  2008.  The Civilian Conservation Corps in Alabama, 1933-1942: A Great and Lasting Good.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  242 pp.  Interviews on CD included.  Forests, parks, TVA, soil conservation; camps listed.

Patrick, Kevin.  2004.  Pennsylvania Caves & Other Rocky Roadside Wonders [show caves, coal mines, rock cities].  Mechanicsburg, Pa.: Stackpole Books.  256 pp.

Pederson, Daniel.  1999.  “The Search for Hidden Life” [taxonomic project to catalog every species of plant and animal in Great Smoky Mountains National Park].  Newsweek, 22 November, 82-83.

Pegram, Tim.  2007.  The Blue Ridge Parkway by Foot: A Park Ranger’s Memoir [469-mile backpacking trip].  Contributions to Southern Appalachian Studies, no. 16.  Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland.  310 pp.

Petersen, David.  1993.  Great Smoky Mountains National Park [elementary-level text with photos].  Chicago: Childrens Press.  45 pp.

Philippon, Daniel J.  1997.  Landmarks of American Nature Writing, from Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains and Shenandoah Valley [annotated bibliography; 1612 (William Strachey) to 1974 (Annie Dillard)].  Charlottesville: University of Virginia Library.  64 pp.

Phillips, Douglas Jay.  2002.  Discovering Alabama Wetlands.  Photographs by Robert P. Falls.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  128 pp.

Phillips, Douglas Jay.  2006.  Discovering Alabama Forests [forestry history].  Photographs by Robert P. Falls, Sr.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  108 pp.

Pierce, Daniel S.  2000.  The Great Smokies: From Natural Habitat to National Park.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  296 pp.
Pierce, Daniel S.  2003.  “The Road to Nowhere: Tourism Development versus Environmentalism in the Great Smoky Mountains.”  In Southern Journeys: Tourism, History, and Culture in the Modern South, ed. R. Starnes, 196-214.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.

Platt, Carolyn V.  2012.  Ohio Hill Country: A Rewoven Landscape.  Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press.  49 pp.  The natural history of southeastern Ohio is charted through color photos, maps, charts, and Platt’s narrative.

Porter, Rob, and Michael A. Tarrant.  2005.  “Wilderness Non-Use Values and Environmental Justice in the North Georgia Appalachians.”  Environmental Practice 7, no. 2: 108-123.

Powell, Katrina, ed.  2009.  “Answer at Once”: Letters of Mountain Families in Shenandoah National Park, 1934-1938 [500 families were displaced with the park’s creation].  Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.  174 pp.

Powell, Katrina M.  2002.  “Writing the Geography of the Blue Ridge Mountains: How Displacement Recorded the Land” [Shenandoah National Park].  Biography 25 (Winter): 73-94.

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Prytherch, David L.  2000.  “Digging Themselves a Hole: Dredging and the Changing Value of Western Pennsylvania’s Rivers” [Allegheny and Ohio Rivers].  Pennsylvania Geographer 37 (Fall/Winter): 159-194.

Purvis, Jesse M., and Lisa Wilson.  2000.  “Hydrologic Influences on Fecal Coliform Bacteria in a Tributary to New River Gorge National River.”  In Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 15-16, 1999, Boone, North Carolina, 24-31.  Glen Jean, W.Va.: National Park Service.

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Randolph, John N.  2005.  The Battle for Alabama’s Wilderness: Saving the Great Gymnasiums of Nature [Sipsey, Cheaha, and Dugger Mountain Wilderness Areas within Bankhead and Talladega National Forests].  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  263 pp.

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Rehbein, Ed, and Randall Sanger.  2011.  West Virginia Waterfalls: The New River Gorge.  Terra Alta, W.Va: Headline Books.  112 pp.  Captioned color photos, with maps, of 116 falls of the Gauley, Bluestone, and New Rivers.

Reiter, Chris.  2001.  “Puc Puggy Lives! In the Footsteps of William Bartram, a Corps of Scientists and Volunteers Surveys the Biodiversity of the Appalachian Trail.”  Wild Earth 11 (Spring): 82-86.

Remo, Jonathan W. F., and J. Steven Kite.  2000.  “Geologic Controls on Landslides in the New River Gorge, West Virginia” [between Hinton and Fayette Station].  In Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 15-16, 1999, Boone, North Carolina, 87-97.  Glen Jean, W.Va.: National Park Service.

Rentch, James S., and Ronald H. Fortney.  1997.  “The Vegetation of West Virginia Grass Bald Communities.”  Castanea 62 (September): 147-160.

Rhoads, Ann Fowler, and  Timothy A. Block.  2007.  The Plants of Pennsylvania: An Illustrated Manual [authoritative classification; detailed drawings].  Illustrations by Anna Anisko.  2nd ed.  Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.  1042 pp.

Rich, Jeff.  2011.  Watershed: The French Broad River [N.C., Tenn.; 40 color photos; pollution].  Essays by Rod Slemmons and French Broad Riverkeeper, Hartwell Carson.  Portland, Ore.: Photolucida.  94 pp.

Rohr, Karl.  2007.  “In a Lusty but Not Boastful Manner: Harvey Broome and the Crafting of a Wilderness Philosophy” [correspondence; 1964 Wilderness Act; Great Smoky Mountains].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 13, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 137-152.

Roody, William C.  2002.  Mushrooms of West Virginia and the Central Appalachians [identification guide; 400 species; color photos].  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  520 pp.

Roth, Richard A.  2000.  “American Heritage Rivers: A New Model for Watershed Planning in Appalachia.”  In A Geographic Perspective of Pittsburgh and the Alleghenies: From Precambrian to Post-Industrial, ed. K. Patrick and J. Scarpaci, 196-203.  Washington, D.C.: Association of American Geographers.

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Ryan, Christopher W., and Michael R. Vaughan.  2004.  “Den Characteristics of Black Bears in Southwestern Virginia.” Southeastern Naturalist 3, no. 4: 659-668.

Sanderson, Carol A.  2006.  A Guide to Common Pennsylvania Wildflowers [285 wildflowers; 300 color photos].  Reedsville, Pa.: Breezewood Publications.  230 pp.

Sarvis, Will.  2011.  The Jefferson National Forest: An Appalachian Environmental History. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  354 pp.  Contents: Prehistoric southwestern Virginia -- Agricultural settlers -- Turnpikes and romance in the mountains -- Industrial logging discovers Appalachia -- JNF and the rise of national conservation -- The Depression era -- World War II and postwar transitions -- The Mount Rogers National Recreation Area -- From commodity interests to ecological forestry -- Cultural resources -- Sacred land -- Old commons meets the new -- Epilogue -- Appendix A: Pioneer Forest: a case study in modern selective forest management -- Appendix B: Payment in lieu of taxes -- Appendix C: Miscellaneous statistics and recent budget data.

Scheuerman, Phillip.  2011.  “The Environmental Health of Appalachia and the Role of the Environmental Health Program at ETSU” [East Tennessee State University, Johnson City].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 1 (Summer): 59-60.

Schiller, Mike.  2011.  “Pittsburgh: City of Green Champions.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 1 (Summer): 44-47.  Green Building Alliance and the region’s many progressive projects.

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Shabecoff, Philip.  1998.  “Afer Decades of Deception, A Time to Act” [legal imperative].  In An Appalachian Tragedy: Air Pollution and Tree Death in the Eastern Forests of North America,  ed. H. Ayers, J. Hager, and C. E. Little, 184-197.  San Francisco: Sierra Club Books.

Shaffner, Randolph P.  2009.  First Creation: 100 Years of Land Conservation [photos].  Highlands, N.C.: Faraway Publishing.  96 pp.  Highlands-Cashiers Plateau, Blue Ridge Mountains.

Shaluta, Stephen J.  2010.  West Virginia Beauty, Familiar and Rare.  Photographs by Steve Shaluta, text by Jeanne Mozier.  Charleston, W.Va: Quarrier Press.  124 pp.  Coffee-table size volume of captioned, full-page color photographs of outdoor settings.

Shaluta, Steve, and Edwin Michael.  2012.  Wild and Wonderful: The Wildlife of West Virginia.  Photographs by Steve Shaluta; text by Edwin Michael.  Charleston, W.Va.: Quarrier Press.  72 pp.

Shaluta, Steve, Jr.  2004.  The State Parks of West Virginia [full-page color photos].  Charleston, W.Va.: Quarrier Press.  60 pp.

Sharber, Chad, and Alan Mills.  2000.  “Defending the Wilderness” [Rockcastle Co., Ky.: Anglin Falls: John B. Stephenson Memorial Forest].  Appalachian Heritage 28 (Spring): 10-12.

Sharp, Llyn.  2000.  “Water Quality Education for Teachers in the New River Valley” [Va.; Save Our Streams; K-12].  In Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 15-16, 1999, Boone, North Carolina, 32-41.  Glen Jean, W.Va.: National Park Service.

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Silver, Timothy.  2003.  Mount Mitchell and the Black Mountains: An Environmental History of the Highest Peaks in Eastern America.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  322 pp.

Simmons, Jo Ann.  2001.  “Learning Happens” [aquaculture labs teach rural students math, science; Ala.; PACERS Small Schools Co-op].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 18 (Spring): 18-21.

Simo, Melanie Louise.  2003.  Forest & Garden: Traces of Wildness in a Modernizing Land, 1897-1949 [references to Benton MacKaye, Appalachian Trail].  Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia.  302 pp.
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Wadley, Jeff, and Dwight McCarter.  2002.  Mayday! Mayday! Aircraft Crashes in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, 1920-2000.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  212 pp.

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Williams, Charles E.  2006.  Along the Allegheny River: The Northern Watershed [photo-retrospective; western Pa.].  Postcard History Series.  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  128 pp.  Contents: The Upper Allegheny Valley -- The Conewango Valley -- The Brokenstraw Valley -- The Oil Creek Valley -- The French Creek Valley -- The Tionesta Creek Valley -- The Clarion River Valley -- The Middle Allegheny River Valley -- References.

Williams, Charles E.  2006.  Along the Allegheny River: The Southern Watershed [photo-retrospective; western Pa.].  Postcard History Series.  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  127 pp.  Contents: The Red Bank Creek valley -- The Mahoning Creek and Crooked Creek valleys -- The Kiskiminetas River and Loyalhanna Creek valleys -- The Conemaugh River valley -- The Lower Allegheny River valley -- References.

Williams, Jack.  2006.  East 40 Degrees: An Interpretive Atlas [Appalachian Mountain chain, Ala. to Me.; geography, geology, local history, cities and towns].  Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.  248 pp.

Williams, Jonathan. 2004.  Review of Wendell Berry’s Citizenship Papers (Shoemaker & Hoard, 2003).  Nantahala: A Review of Writing and Photography in Appalachia 2, no. 2 (Winter-Spring): Review section, 6 paras.  http://nantahalareview.org/issue2-2/view/WILLIAMS_Review.htm.

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Williams, Philip Lee.  1999.  Crossing Wildcat Ridge: A Memoir of Nature and Healing [north-central Ga.].  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  225 pp.

Williams, Wayne E., and S. Dwayne Stutzman.  2000.  “A Visual Assessment of the New River” [Ashe and Alleghany Cos., N.C.; national scenic river portion (26.5 mi.)].  In Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 15-16, 1999, Boone, North Carolina, 117-123.  Glen Jean, W.Va.: National Park Service.

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Winchester, Renea.  2010.  “Remembering” [memoir; 75th anniversary of Great Smoky Mountains National Park].  Appalachian Heritage 38, no. 2 (Spring): 65-68.

Wise, Kenneth, and Ronald H. Petersen.  1998.  A Natural History of Mount Le Conte [Tenn.; Great Smoky Mountains].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  137 pp.

Wise, Kenneth.  2000.  “‘A Certain Class of Persons Ambitious’: Smoky Mountain Exploration and the Buckley-Clingman Controversy” [1858; N.C.; search for highest peak/naming opportunity].  Journal of East Tennessee History 72: 30-48.

Wiser, Susan K., and Peter S. White.  1999.  “High-Elevation Outcrops and Barrens of the Southern Appalachian Mountains” [Tenn., N.C.].  In Savannas, Barrens, and Rock Outcrop Plant Communities of North America, ed. R. Anderson, 119-132.  New York: Cambridge University Press.

Wofford, B. Eugene, and Edward W. Chester.  2002.  Guide to the Trees, Shrubs, and Woody Vines of Tennessee [technical reference manual; 380 color plates].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  286 pp.

Zickefoose, Julie.  2006.  Letters from Eden: A Year at Home, in the Woods [Ohio; seasonal observations by a field biologist and NPR commentator; numerous sketches, watercolors].  Boston: Houghton Mifflin.  224 pp.

Zumbrun, Francis.  2010.  A History of Green Ridge State Forest [Allegany Co., Western Md.]. Charleston, S.C.: History Press.  157 pp.