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Architecture, Historic Buildings, Historic Sites

Homes, outbuildings, significant structures and landscapes, guidebooks.

Allan, Randy.  2006.  Lemuel Chenoweth, 1811-1887: Bridging the Gaps [accomplished W.Va. covered bridge builder].  Parsons, W.Va.: McClain Printing Co.  166 pp.

Allen, John C., Andrew Lewis, and Walter Smalling.  2011.  Uncommon Vernacular: The Early Houses of Jefferson County, West Virginia: 1735-1835 [survey of 250 buildings].  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.  367 pp.  Architectural drawings, floor plans, and maps by Andrew Lewis, and 700 photographs by Walter Smalling.  Jefferson County is in W.Va.’s eastern panhandle, in the Shenandoah Valley.

Allen, Karen Ebert.  1997.  “Historic American Engineering Record for the Fayette Station Bridge”  [New River Gorge, W.Va.].  In  Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 11-12, 1997, Glade Springs Resort, Daniels, West Virginia, 40-47.  Glen Jean, W.Va.: National Park Service.

Anderson, Belinda.  2000.  “Living in the Quiet Zone” [adjacent mammoth radio telescopes at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank, W.Va.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 26 (Fall): 50-55.

Anderson, Colleen.  2001.  “Visiting Historic Malden” [listed on the National Register of Historic Places].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 27 (Fall): 40-41.

Architecture in Appalachia: Articles, Essays, Fiction, Poetry, and Reviews.  1999.  Special issue, Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 16 (Spring): 1-44.

Austin, Linda T.  2009.  “Unrealized Expectations: Cumberland, the New Deal’s Only Homestead Project” [1934; experimental  subsistence community; Crossville, Tenn.].  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 68, no. 3 (Winter): 433-450.

Austin, Peter.  1997.  “The Work of Rafael Guastavino in Western North Carolina” [vaulting in Biltmore House and Basilica of St. Lawrence].  In May We All Remember Well: A Journal of the History & Cultures of Western North Carolina,  Vol. 1, ed. R. S. Brunk, 63-79.  Asheville, N.C.: Robert S. Brunk Auction Services Inc.

Beckman, James A.  2006.  Harpers Ferry [W.Va.; postcard history; John Brown; Storer College].  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  127 p.

Billings, Dwight B., and Kate Black.  2011.  “Preserving Teges Creek” [i.e., Beech Creek, pseud.].  Appalachian Heritage 39, no. 2 (Spring): 47-49.  Testimony “submitted to the...Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet in 2010 in response to a call for comment on a request for a permit to strip mine a parcel of land in Clay County.”  Teges Creek is the site of James S. Brown’s landmark work, Beech Creek: A Study of a Kentucky Mountain Neighborhood (1941), and follow-up studies: Mountain Families in Transition: A Case Study of Appalachian Migration (1971), by Harry Schwarzweller, James Brown, and J. J. Mangalam; and The Road to Poverty: The Making of Wealth and Hardship in Appalachia (2000), by Dwight Billings and Kathleen Blee.

Binnicker, Margaret Duncan.  2000.  “A Garden City in Appalachia Tennessee: Grosvenor Atterbury’s Design for Erwin” [Unicoi Co., 1916; designed for CC&O Railway].  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 59 (Fall): 274-289.

Bishir, Catherine W., Michael T. Southern, and Jennifer F. Martin.  1999.  A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Western North Carolina [1200 buildings; 370 photos].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  488 pp.

Blalock, Presley, ed.  2009.  “A Visit to the Foxfire Museum: Students Tour Their Appalachian Heritage.”  Foxfire Magazine 43, no. 3-4 (Fall/Winter): 73-80.  Brief reflections of 15 students; Mountain City, Ga.

Brosi, George.  2011.  “Save the Don West Homeplace: An Editorial” [1906-1992; Gilmer Co., Ga.].  Appalachian Heritage 39, no. 2 (Spring): 8-9.  “...poet, essayist, educator, and activist....and promoter of mountain music and mountain culture,” Don West was Featured Author, fall 2008 issue.

Brown, Fred.  2005.  Marking Time: East Tennessee Historical Markers and the Stories Behind Them [local history sites].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  356 pp.

Brunk, Andrew James.  1997.  “Robert Duncanson’s View of Asheville, North Carolina, 1850" [free black artist; earliest known painting of Asheville].  In May We All Remember Well: A Journal of the History & Cultures of Western North Carolina, Vol. 1, ed. R. S. Brunk, 114-123.  Asheville, N.C.: Robert S. Brunk Auction Services Inc.

Burchett-Anderson, Theresa.  2006.  “Museum Review: Southwest Virginia Museum Historical State Park” [Big Stone Gap, Va.].  Appalachian Journal 33, no. 2 (Winter): 246-248.

Carlisle, Barbara.  2006.  “The Barter Theatre Legend” [founded 1932, Abingdon, Va.; history, productions, actors].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 22, no. 2 (Fall/Winter): 44-49.

Carlisle, Fred.  2004.  “The Past in the Present: The Greater Newport Rural Historic District” [Giles Co., Va.; 34 square miles; community action project].  Appalachian Journal 32 (Fall): 50-66.

Cary, Michael D., and Timothy Kelly, ed.  2007.  This American Courthouse: One Hundred Years of Service to the People of Westmoreland County [founded 1773; Greensburg, Pa.].  Latrobe, Pa.: Publications of the Saint Vincent College Center for Northern Appalachian Studies.  131 pp.  Contents: Westmoreland County Courthouses: Hanna’s Tavern to Courthouse Square / James V. Steeley -- Westmoreland County Jailhouses / Helene Smith -- William Kauffmann: Courthouse Architect / Joseph Benkovich -- Architectural Style / Timothy Kelly -- The Courthouse in the Community / Michael D. Carey -- Legal Environment: Early Twentieth Century / Mark Sorice -- The Social Environment of the County Seat in the Early Twentieth Century / Erin L. Pearson -- History of the Westmoreland County Bar Association / R. Louis DeRose and H. Nevin Wollman -- The Changing Role of the Judge / Daniel J. Ackerman.

Chambers, S. Allen.  2004.  Buildings of West Virginia [architectural guidebook; 1000 entries, 375 photographs, 60 maps].  Buildings of the United States.  New York: Oxford University Press.  663 pp.

Coleman, Ralph S.  1999.  “Black Iron Tongue” [trailer home opinion].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 16 (Spring): 34-35.

Condee, William Faricy.  2005.  Coal and Culture: Opera Houses in Appalachia [used as multipurpose community facilities; 1860s-1930s; Ky., Ohio, Pa., W. Va].  Athens: Ohio University Press.  210 pp.

Conte, Bob.  2010.  “Debunking the Bunker.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 36, no. 4 (Winter): 25-29.  The Greenbrier Hotel’s hidden government bomb shelter, kept secret for 30 years, was revealed in a 1992 Washington Post Magazine article.

Conte, Bob.  2010.  “Hidden in Plain Sight: The Greenbrier’s Bunker.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 36, no. 4 (Winter): 18-24.  White Sulphur Springs resort hotel’s top-secret underground facility built 1958-1962 and designed as a Cold War bomb shelter for the U.S. Congress.

Cox, Joyce, and W. Eugene Cox, comps. and ed.  2001.  History of Washington County, Tennessee [250 years; reference text; winner of American Association of State and Local History’s Award of Merit, 2002].  Johnson City, Tenn.: Overmountain Press.  1,290 pp.

Craig, Christopher.  2009.  “The Curio House at Harpers Ferry.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 35, no. 2 (Summer): 60-65.  History of 100-year-old Laurel Lodge inn.

Culvahouse, Tim.  2007.  The Tennessee Valley Authority: Design and Persuasion [landscape; visual art; photo-essay].  New York: Princeton Architectural Press.  144 pp.

Dart, Susan.  1997.  The Old Home Place [Polk Co., N.C.; John Hiram Johnson House; listed in National Register of Historic Places].  Louisville, Ky.: Chicago Spectrum Press.  101 pp.

Dempsey, Sarah.  2001.  “Norton House: Malden’s Best-Kept Secret” [historic 1840 house in Kanawha Valley].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 27 (Fall): 37-39.

Dickinson, W. Calvin, Michael E. Birdwell, and Homer D. Kemp.  2002.  Upper Cumberland Historic Architecture [eight-county region above Carthage].  Franklin, Tenn.: Hillsboro Press.  148 pp.

Dickinson, W. Calvin.  2004.  “Sheltering the People: Folk Architecture in the Upper Cumberland Region” [Ky., Tenn.].  In Rural Life and Culture in the Upper Cumberland, ed. M. Birdwell and W. Dickinson, 35-48.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Donnelly, Lu, H. David Brumble, and Franklin Toker, ed.  2010.  Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania [encyclopedic, with generous local histories].  Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.  641 pp.  Contents: The western capital: Pittsburgh and Allegheny County -- Rolling hills and rolling mills -- Ridge and valley -- Great forest -- Oil and water.

Donnelly, Lu.  2010.  “Architecture Around Us: Log Chapels.”  Pennsylvania History 93, no. 4 (Winter 2010-11): 14-17.  Nineteenth-century log churches.

Drake, Dawn M.  2009.  “Rural Architecture as a Historical Cultural Indicator: The Case of Barns in Monroe County, Pennsylvania.”  Pennsylvania Geographer 47, no. 1 (Fall/Winter): 90-113.

Emrick, Michael.  1996.  “Blount Mansion: Architectural Analysis and the Reinterpretation of a Tennessee Landmark” [built 1792; Gov. William Blount; Knoxville].  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 55 (Winter): 310-319.

Ensminger, Robert F.  [1992] 2003.  The Pennsylvania Barn: Its Origin, Evolution, and Distribution in North America [maps, figures, photos].  2nd ed.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.  348 pp.

Fanslow, Mary.  2003.  “From Timbering to Tourism: The Wonderland Hotel’s Early Years” [Tenn. mountains; early 20th-century; new lumber wealth; class hierarchy].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 9 (Fall): 433-449.

Faulkner, Charles H.  2000.  “Knoxville and the Southern Appalachian Frontier: An Archaeological Perspective” [four 18th-century homes].  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 59 (Fall): 158-173.

Feather, Carl E.  2011.  “Berkeley Castle: Living in a Landmark” [history; Berkeley Springs, Morgan Co.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 37, no. 4 (Winter): 8-15.  The 8,500-square-foot castle, now privately owned, began construction in 1885 and “is thought to be modeled, on half scale, after England’s Berkeley Castle where King Edward II was murdered in 1327.”

Feather, Carl.  2010.  “‘Just a Little Bit of History’: Finding the Fairfax Stone.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 36, no. 1 (Spring): 50-55.  Historical boundary marker of 1746 land grant by King Charles II; located two miles off a back road at the convergence of Tucker, Grant, and Preston Cos., near Garrett Co., Md., “at the headspring of the Potomac River.”

Gorman, Michelle.  1999.  “Turning Trash into Treasure: Recycling from a Waste Stream Builds a House” [Athens Co., Ohio].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 16 (Spring): 18-22.

Griffith, Clay.  2001.  “An Inventory of Douglas Ellington’s Architectural Work in Western North Carolina” [Asheville; b. 1886].  In May We All Remember Well: A Journal of the History & Cultures of Western North Carolina, Vol. 2, ed. R. S. Brunk, 91-119.  Asheville, N.C.: Robert S. Brunk Auction Services, Inc.

Hansley, Richard.  2011.  Asheville’s Historic Architecture [N.C.].  Charleston, S.C.: History Press.  173 pp.

Hardy, Michael C.  2005.  A Short History of Old Watauga County. [N.C.].  Boone, N.C.: Parkway Publishers.  238 pp.

Harris, Frances Katherine Parr.  1999.  “West Virginia Homeplaces: A Study of Architectural Resources in the Appalachian Corridor H Project Area” [federal highway; historic preservation].  M.H.P. thesis, University of Georgia.  94 pp.  Masters Abstracts International 37: 1344.

Harshaw, Lou.  2007.  Asheville: Mountain Majesty [N.C.; history, urban development; Blue Ridge Parkway; Grove Park Inn; Biltmore Estate].  Fairview, N.C.: Bright Mountain Books.  358 pp.

Harvey, Jeffrey.  2002.  “Fidler’s Mill: Rediscovering an Upshur County Landmark.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 28 (Summer): 18-23.

Hill, David.  Interview by Jane Harris Woodside. 1999.  “Reading the Landscape: An Interview with David Hill” [landscape architect].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 16 (Spring): 23-26.

Historic West Virginia Jail Spared from Wrecking Ball [Charles Town, W.Va.; trial site for 1920s Mine Wars and abolitionist John Brown (1859)].  2001.  United Mine Workers Journal 112 (March-April): 23.

Hornyak, Deanna.  1996.  “Arthurdale: Homesteading in West Virginia” [New Deal subsistence community].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 13 (Summer): 25-30.

Howell, Benita J.  2001.  “Rugby, Tennessee’s Master Planner: Franklin Webster Smith of Boston” [1880s Utopian experiment].  Journal of East Tennessee History 73: 23-38.

Howell, Benita J., and Susan E. Neff.  2002.  “Victorian Environmental Planning in Rugby, Tennessee: A Blueprint for the Future” [Morgan Co., Tenn.; Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area].  In Culture, Environment, and Conservation in the Appalachian South, ed. B. Howell, 170-181.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Huddleston, Eugene, and Adelaide Ballou.  1997.  “The New River and the American Landscape Tradition: Part II” [W.Va.; survey of historic landscape paintings].  In  Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 11-12, 1997, Glade Springs Resort, Daniels, West Virginia, 110-119.  Glen Jean, W.Va.: National Park Service.

Hughes, Delos D.  2001.  “The Housing Ideal at Cumberland Homesteads” [1930s Crossville, Tenn.; New Deal program to create subsistence homestead community; (cf. Arthurdale, W.Va.  project)].  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 60 (Spring): 38-53.

Hughes, Thomas.  [1881] 2008.  Rugby, Tennessee: Some Account of the Settlement Founded on the Cumberland Plateau [utopian, collective settlement].  Reprint, with an introduction by Benita J. Howell.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  168 pp.  Originally published: London: Macmillan.

Humes, Harry.  1997.  “The Girard Theater” [Girardville, Pa].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 14 (Winter): 19.

Irwin, John Rice.  2012.  The Unlikely Story of the Museum of Appalachia and How It Came to Be: As Told by Its Founder [Norris, Tenn.].  Atglen, Pa.: Schiffer.  144 pp.

Johnson, Bruce E.  1997.  “Built Without an Architect: Architectural Inspirations for the Grove Park Inn” [1912; Asheville; using native fieldstone].  In May We All Remember Well: A Journal of the History & Cultures of Western North Carolina, Vol. 1, ed. R. S. Brunk, 214-227.  Asheville, N.C.: Robert S. Brunk Auction Services Inc.

Johnson, Mary E.  2006.  “‘There’s Nothing New, Everything Is Old Today’: Looking Back on One Hundred Years of West Virginia Archives and History” [1905-2005; centennial of the state archives].  West Virginia History 60 (2004-2006): 49-82.

Johnson, Mary.  1997.  “An ‘Ever Present Bone of Contention’: The Heyward Shepherd Memorial” [to the first victim of John Brown’s raiders, a free black, 1859, Harpers Ferry, W.Va.; dedicated 1931 by The United Daughters of the Confederacy and The Sons of Confederate Veterans].  West Virginia History 56: 1-26.

Johnson, Rody.  2000.  “Old Sweet Springs: A Lewis Family Legacy” [Monroe Co. mineral springs resort; founded 1790; Grand Hotel built 1835].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 26 (Summer): 60-65.

Jones, Robbie D.  1997.  The Historic Architecture of Sevier County, Tennessee.  Sevierville, Tenn.: Smoky Mountain Historical Society.  408 pp.

Jourdan, Katherine M.  2000.  Historic West Virginia: The National Register of Historic Places [805 locations].  Charleston, W.Va.: Division of Culture and History, State Historic Preservation Office.  156 pp.

Jourdan, Katherine M., ed.  2000.  Historic West Virginia: The National Register of Historic Places [descriptions; by county].  Charleston, W.Va.: Division of Culture and History, State Historic Preservation Office.  156 pp.

Kapsch, Robert J.  2000.  “Benjamin Wright and the Design and Construction of the Monocacy Aqueduct” [Va.; C&O Canal].  In Canal History and Technology Proceedings 19: 181-222.  Easton, Pa.: Canal History and Technology Press.

Kemp, Emory L., and Beverly B. Fluty.  1999.  The Wheeling Suspension Bridge: A Pictorial History [W.Va.; landmark structure completed 1859].  Charleston, W.Va.: Pictorial Histories Publishing Company.  82 pp.

Kemp-Rye, Mark.  1999.  “Saved-Again!: Restoring the Barrackville Covered Bridge” [built 1853].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 25 (Fall): 56-61.

Laughlin, Robert W. M., and Melissa C. Jurgensen.  2007.  Kentucky’s Covered Bridges [photo retrospective; over 700 once existed, 13 remain; photos of 130 discovered].  Images of America.  Charleston, S.C.:Arcadia.  128 pp.

Kidney, Walter C.  [1985] 1997.  Pittsburgh’s Landmark Architecture: The Historic Buildings of Pittsburgh and Allegheny County.  Pittsburgh, Pa.: Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation.  717 pp.  With 1500 photos of 645 sites.  Updates the 1985 edition of Landmark Architecture: Pittsburgh and Allegheny County.

Lynn, Joy, and Chuck Lynn.  2011.  “Esau in the Coal Fields: Owing Our Souls to the Company Store.”  Interview by Michael Kline.  Appalachian Heritage 39, no. 3 (Summer): 69-84, with photo, 68.  Whipple Colliery Company Store, Oak Hill, W.Va., built 1893.  Interview with restorers Joy and Chuck Lynn.

Martin, Louis C.  2006.  “The Pine Bank Bridge and its Changing Meaning through the Years” [1871 covered bridge, Greene Co., Pa.].  Western Pennsylvania History 89, no 2 (Summer): 26-33.

Maskey, Vishakha, Cheryl Brown, and Ge Lin.  2009.  “Assessing Factors Associated With Listing a Historic Resource in the National Register of Historic Places” [W.Va.].  Economic Development Quarterly 23, no. 4 (November): 342-350.

McCleary, Ann E.  2000.  “Forging a Regional Identity: Development of Rural Vernacular Architecture in the Central Shenandoah Valley, 1790-1850.”  In After the Backcountry: Rural Life in the Great Valley of Virginia, 1800-1900, ed. K. Koons and W. Hofstra, 92-110. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

McDonald, Travis C., Jr.  2000.  “Constructing Optimism: Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest” [adjacent present-day Lynchburg, Va.].  Chap. 10 in People, Power, Places: Perspectives in Vernacular Architecture, VIII, ed. S. McMurry and A. Adams, 176-200.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

McGehee, Margaret.  1998.  “A Castle in the Wilderness: Rugby Colony, Tennessee, 1880-1887.”  Journal of East Tennessee History 70: 62-89.

McNelis, Jim.  2012.  “Growing Up in Arthurdale” [Preston Co.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 38, no. 2 (Summer): 8-17.  Sidebar: “Dancing with Mrs. Roosevelt.”  “...established in 1933 by the federal government at the encouragement of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt.  The model homestead community – the first of its kind – offered struggling families from nearby mining towns a fresh start with a home of their own, five acres of tillable land, and other amenities.”

Melling, Carol.  2008.  Crossings: Bridge Building in West Virginia [history].  With an introduction by Governor Joe Manchin.  Edited by Terry Lively and Randall Nichols.  Photography by Eric Steele and David Bowen.  Louisville, Ky.: Four-Colour Imports. 124 pp.

Michael, Edwin Daryl.  2005.  “Life in the Levi Shinn House” [National Register log structure; built 1778, Shinnston, W.Va.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 31, no. 3 (Fall): 58-65.

Milbauer, John A.  1996/97.  “Pennsylvania Extended in the Cherokee Country: A Study of Log Architecture” [transplanted to Oklahoma].  Pennsylvania Folklife 46 (Winter): 92-101.

Miller, Larry L.  2001.  Tennessee Place-Names [1900 entries].  Bloomington: Indiana University Press.  248 pp.

Milnes, Gerald.  1998.  “The Barns of Pendleton County.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 24 (Spring): 50-55.

Morningstar, William.  2000.  “Kentucky Phantoms: A Road Trip” [10 photos of dilapidated buildings, from an exhibition].  Appalachian Heritage 28 (Winter): 8-12.

Moyer, Teresa S., and Paul A. Shackel.  2008.  The Making of Harpers Ferry National Historical Park: A Devil, Two Rivers, and a Dream.  American Association for State and Local History book series.  Lanham, Md.: Altamira Press.  235 pp.  Harpers Ferry became a National Monument in 1944, and a National Historical Park in 1963.

Muller, Edward K., Ronald C. Carlisle, et al.  1994.  Westmoreland  County, Pennsylvania: An Inventory of Historic Engineering  and Industrial Sites.  Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record.  America's Industrial Heritage Project.  Washington, D.C.: GPO.  399 pp.

Murray-Wooley, Carolyn.  2008.  Early Stone Houses of Kentucky.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  227 pp.  Frontier homes and families; photos.

Newton, Stephen.  2009.  “Down by the Old Mill Stream: Now & Then Visits Three Historic Mills.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 25, no.1 (Spring/Summer): 30-32.  St. John Milling Company, Watauga, Tenn.; White’s Mill, Abingdon, Va.; Old French Mill, Dandridge, Tenn.

Noblitt, Philip T.  1996.  A Mansion in the Mountains: The Story of Moses & Bertha Cone & Their Blowing Rock Manor.  Boone, N.C.: Parkway Publishers, Inc.  207 pp.

Patteson, Stuart.  2004.  “A Brave New Deal World: The Cumberland Homesteads” [1930s experimental resettlement subsistence community, Crossville, Tenn.].  In Rural Life and Culture in the Upper Cumberland, ed. M. Birdwell and W. Dickinson, 196-210.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Payne, Dale.  2012.  West Virginia Company Stores.  Fayetteville, W.Va.: D. Payne.  240 pp.  Photos of more than 200 stores, with descriptive information about each one including the coal company that operated it.

Phillips, Laura A. W.  1987.  Simple Treasures: The Architectural Legacy of Surry County [N.C.].  Siloam(?), N.C.: Surry County Historical Society.  287 pp.  Photographs of homes and buildings with histories; essays; glossary.

Phillips, Laura A. W., and Deborah Thompson.  1998.  Transylvania: The Architectural History of a Mountain County [N.C.].  Raleigh, N.C.: Transylvania County Joint Historic Preservation Commission in association with Marblehead Publishing.  336 pp.

Platania, Joseph.  2010.  “Huntington’s Memorial Arch.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 36, no. 3 (Fall): 48-51.  Forty-two feet high, built in the 1920s to honor local veterans of WWI.

Platt, Frederick.  2011.  “Horace Trumbauer in Fairmont.”  West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, new series, vol. 5, no. 1 (Spring): 53-74.  Nationally famous architect Trumbauer built Spanish Mission and Tudor Revival mansions and an office building (1907-1911) for the children of Fairmont coal magnate, James Otis Watson, “the father of the West Virginia coal industry.”

Plowden, Kate.  2001.  “Karl Bittner’s Sculptural Work at Biltmore” [Asheville; 1890s].  In May We All Remember Well: A Journal of the History & Cultures of Western North Carolina, Vol. 2, ed. R. S. Brunk, 343-361.  Asheville, N.C.: Robert S. Brunk Auction Services, Inc.

Prince, Jeanie.  2002.  “Back to the Future: Huntington’s Heritage Farm Museum.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 28 (Summer): 44-49.

Pyszka, Kimberly.  2011.  “The Massengale Family and Other Mountain Folk of Rugby, Morgan County, Tennessee.”  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 70, no. 1 (Spring): 4-25.  English utopian community, the Rugby Colony, established 1880.

Raitz, Karl, ed.  1996.  The National Road [Cumberland Road].  George F. Thompson, project director and director of photography; cartography by Gyula Pauer.  The Road and American Culture.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.  489 pp.

Ralston, Jeannie.  1996.  “Bark Grinders and Fly Minders Tell a Tale of Appalachia” [Museum of Appalachia, Norris, Tenn.].  Smithsonian 26 (February): 44-50, 52-53.

Rehder, John B.  2012.  Tennessee Log Buildings: A Folk Tradition.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  160 pp.  Illustrated with over 100 images.  Rehder is also the author of Appalachian Folkways (2004).

Richardson, Jerry.  1999.  “Renovation: From Linoleum to Congoleum: A Memoir” [Lynch, Ky.; privatized coal company-town houses].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 16 (Spring): 27-29.

Ridner, Judith.  2000.  “Status, Culture, and the Structural World in the Valley of Pennsylvania” [Carlisle, Pa.].  In After the Backcountry: Rural Life in the Great Valley of Virginia, 1800-1900, ed. K. Koons and W. Hofstra, 77-91. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Roberts, Katherine.  2004.  “Ritchie County Cellar Houses” [19th century, hand-cut stone foundations, built into hillsides, used for cold food-storage].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 30 (Fall): 40-45.

Roberts, Kathy.  2005. “Tygart Valley Homestead: New Deal Communities in Randolph County” [198 houses built; 1930s]. Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 31, no. 2 (Summer): 10-19, 21.  Sidebar: “The Homestead Movement in West Virginia,” by Gordon Simmons, 18-19.

Robertson, Blanche R.  1997.  “The Waterpowered Mills of Reems Creek” [profiles ten mills].  In May We All Remember Well: A Journal of the History & Cultures of Western North Carolina, Vol. 1, ed. R. S. Brunk, 82-96.  Asheville, N.C.: Robert S. Brunk Auction Services Inc.

Robinson, Ed.  2007.  Historic Inns of Southern West Virginia [photo-retrospective].  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  127 pp.

Ross, Deborah McHenry.  2010.  “A Wonderland of Books: Recalling Carnegie Library in Parkersburg” [built 1905].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 36, no. 3 (Fall): 52-53.

Rybczynski, Witold.  1999.  A Clearing in the Distance: Frederick Law Olmsted and America in the Nineteenth Century [biography; landscape architect of the Biltmore Estate, Asheville, N.C.].  New York: Scribner.  480 pp.

Schimizzi, Sandra Wolk, with Valeria Sofranko Wolk.  2010.  Norvelt: A New Deal Subsistence Homestead [Pa.; Westmoreland Co.].  Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia.  127 pp.  “In 1933, the town of Norvelt became the fourth of 99 planned subsistence homestead communities...for dislocated miners and industrial workers.”  Named for Eleanor Roosevelt.

Shackel, Paul A.  2000.  Archaeology and Created Memory: Public History in a National Park [Harpers Ferry, W.Va.].  Contributions to Global Historical Archaeology series.  New York: Plenum.  191 pp.

Shaluta, Stephen J.  2010.  Mail Pouch Barns of West Virginia [140 color photos].  Charleston, W.Va: Quarrier Press.  140 pp.

Shaluta, Steve, Jr.  2004.  Covered Bridges in West Virginia [color photographs of 17 remaining bridges].  Charleston, W.Va.: Quarrier Press.  Unpaged.

Sims, Elizabeth.  2008.  “Appalachia As a Playground for the Privileged.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 24, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 28-33.  Background on the region’s resorts including W.Va.’s Greenbrier and N.C.’s Biltmore.

Spence, Joe E., and George R. Kiley, ed.  1997.  Landmarks of Loudon County: Its History through Architecture  [Tenn.].  Gloucester Point, Va.: Hallmark Publishing Co.  176 pp.

Stewart, Doug.  1997.  “Saving American Steel” [preserving silent mills as museums].  Smithsonian 28 (August): 84-93.

Stipes, R. Jay, and Karen B. Stipes.  2000.  “Witness Trees of the New River Region in Virginia” [centuries-old landmark trees].  In Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 15-16, 1999, Boone, North Carolina, 42-49.  Glen Jean, W.Va.: National Park Service.

Sully, Susan.  2007.  The Southern Cottage: From the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Florida Keys. New York: Rizzoli.  206 pp.  Profiles of 18 rescued and renovated cottage homes including structures in Roanoke Valley, Va., Cashiers, N.C., and two showcase homes in Flat Rock, N.C.

Tate, Bryan.  2002.  “Appalachian Pioneers and Log Houses” [Sullivan Co., Tenn.]. Journal of Alabama Archaeology 48 (June): 1-18.

Tate, Bryan.  2002.  “Sullivan County Log Homes” [East Tenn.; 1779-1840 settlement patterns; house types: single-pen, double-pen, saddlebag, dogtrot, and I-houses].  Material Culture 34, no. 2: 41-53.

Terrell, Bob.  1997.  Historic Asheville [N.C.; “200 years of history”].  Alexander, N.C.: WorldComm.  256 pp.

Thomas, Sarah.  2011.  “Reviving Adaland.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 1 (Summer): 32.  Restored historic mansion near Philippi, Barbour Co., W.Va., built in 1870 and placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1994.

Tiro, Karim M.  2009.  “The Pioneer Museum: Blue Licks Battlefield State Resort Park” [Mt. Olivet, Ky.].  Ohio Valley History 9, no. 1 (Spring): 65-71.  Battle of Blue Licks, 1782; Daniel Boone.

Turnquist, Gary M.  2000.  “Historic Preservation in a New River Valley Community: Grassy Creek, North Carolina” [added to National Register of Historic Places, 1976].  In Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 15-16, 1999, Boone, North Carolina, 78-86.  Glen Jean, W.Va.: National Park Service.

Turpen, James.  2002.  “Tallulah Falls Township according to Local Historian James Turpen” [Ga.].  Interview by student Samantha Tyler.  Foxfire Magazine 36 (Fall/Winter): 126-139.

Vivian, Daniel J.  2001.  “Public Architecture, Civic Aspirations and the Price of ‘Progress’: A History of the Buncombe County Courthouse.”  In May We All Remember Well: A Journal of the History & Cultures of Western North Carolina, Vol. 2, ed. R. S. Brunk, 154-177.  Asheville, N.C.: Robert S. Brunk Auction Services, Inc.

Waggoner, Lynda S.  2011.  Fallingwater [pictorial].  Edited by Lynda S. Waggoner, photographed by Christopher Little.  New York: Rizzoli.  328 pp. 150 oversize photos, with essays by seven contributors.  Recently restored, Fallingwater was built in 1936 by Frank Lloyd Wright for Edgar Kaufmann in the Laurel Highlands of Pa.’s Allegheny Mountains.

Wallace, Jim.  2012.  A History of the West Virginia Capitol: The House of State [Charleston, W.Va., completed 1932].  Charleston, S.C.: History Press.  156 pp.  Profusely illustrated.

Watkins, Charles Alan, and Elizabeth Lawson.  1999.  “Invershiel: A New Old World in the Blue Ridge Mountains” [Linville, N.C.; 1960s Scottish-motif planned village].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 16 (Spring): 3-8.

Webb, Franklin F., and Ricky L. Cox.  2012.  The Water-Powered Mills of Floyd County, Virginia: Illustrated Histories, 1770-2010.  Contributions to Southern Appalachian Studies series, no. 30.  Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland.  348 pp.  “Topics covered include the difficulties involved in identifying early mills, the importance of mill site selection, water wheel types, laws regulating mills, the decline of milling and physical remains at abandoned mill sites. It also provides individual histories of 140 grist, flour, and feed mills, a few of which also processed wool; based primarily on oral histories, records, newspapers.”

Wesolowsky, Tony.  1996.  “A Jewel in the Crown of Old King Coal: Eckley Miners’ Village.”  Pennsylvania Heritage 22 (Winter): 30-37.  Recreated anthracite community; Luzerne County, Pa.

West, Carroll Van.  1995.  Tennessee’s Historic Landscapes: A Traveler’s Guide.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  503 pp.

West, Carroll Van.  2001.  Tennessee’s New Deal Landscape: A Guidebook [250 historic sites].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  281 pp.

West, Carroll Van, section editor.  2006.  “Architecture” [signed entries].  In Encyclopedia of Appalachia, ed. R. Abramson and J. Haskell, 729-766 (with introductory essay, 729-734).  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Weston State Hospital.  2009.  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 35, no. 1 (Spring): 36-37.  Construction of Lewis County’s Trans-Allegheny Asylum for the Insane, the largest cut-stone building in North America and declared a National Historic landmark in 1990, was begun in 1858 and completed in 1881.

White, Warren H.  2003.  Covered Bridges in the Southeastern United States: A Comprehensive Illustrated Catalog.  Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland.  214 pp.

Whitley, Phyllis Campbell.  2011.  “Finding the Barns of Summers County.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 37, no. 4 (Winter): 52-55.  The author has documented more than 200 barns in the area.

Whitley, Phyllis Campbell.  2011.  Barns of Summers County: West Virginia Heritage.  Manakin-Sabot, Va.: Dementi Milestone Publishing.  240 pp.  Color photos and histories of 230 barns built before 1950.

Wilhelm, Hubert.  2008.  “The Pennsylvania-Dutch Barn in Southeastern Ohio.”  Material Culture 39, no. 1: 51-60.  Late-18th century to the mid-19th century transitional region.

Williams, Michael Ann.  [1991] 2004.  Homeplace: The Social Use and Meaning of the Folk Dwelling in Southwestern North Carolina.  Reprint.  Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.  Originally published: Athens: University of Georgia Press.  190 pp.

Wood, Miriam, and David Simmons.  2007.  Covered Bridges: Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia.  Photographs by Bill Miller.  Wooster, Ohio: Wooster Book Company.  289 pp.

Woodside, Jane Harris.  1996.  “Looking for Main Street America.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 13 (Spring): 9-14.  West Virginia University’s involvement in documenting construction of the Cumberland Road.

Zaunders, Bo.  2004.  The Great Bridge-Building Contest [children’s literature; 1850 (West) Virginia; Lemuel Chenoweth’s renowned covered bridge in Philippi].  Illustrated by Roxie Munro.  New York: Harry N. Abrams.  32 pp.

Zuchowski, Dave.  1999.  “The House with No Square Corners” [Frank Lloyd Wright’s “Kentuck Knob”; Laurel Highlands, Pa.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 16 (Spring): 14-17.