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Archaeology and Physical Anthropology

Prehistoric, pre-European. (For Cultural Anthropology/Ethnology, see: Social Conditions.)

 

Abrams, Eliot M., and AnnCorinne Freter, ed.  2005.  The Emergence of the Moundbuilders: The Archaeology of Tribal Societies in Southeastern Ohio [Hocking River Valley; 12 essays].  Athens: Ohio University Press.  264 pp.

Adovasio, J. M.  2006.  “The Great Journey: A Personal Odyssey” [principal archaeological investigator, Meadowcroft Rockshelter, Washington Co., Pa.; one of the oldest settlements in North America. Excavation begun 1973].  Western Pennsylvania History 89, no. 2 (Summer): 34-43.

Adovasio, J. M., and Jake Page.  2002.  “Searching for the First Americans: A 500-Year Quest” [Meadowcroft Village rock shelter, Pa.].  Western Pennsylvania History 85 (Summer): 14-29.

Adovasio, J. M., et al.  2001.  “The Archaic of the Upper Ohio Valley: A View from Meadowcroft Rockshelter” [Washington Co., Pa.].  In Archaic Transitions in Ohio and Kentucky Prehistory, ed. O. Prufer, S. Pedde, and R. Meindl, 141-182.  Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press.

Adovasio, J. M., with Jake Page.  2002.  The First Americans: In Pursuit of Archaeology’s Greatest Mystery [pre-Clovis human presence; earliest site in Southwestern Pa.].  New York: Random House.  328 pp.

Anderson, Rebecca, Charles H. Faulkner, Richard A. Holt, and Jennifer G. Luedke.  2009.  “The Lones Dowell Farm: An Archaeological, Architectural, and Ethnohistoric Study.”  Journal of East Tennessee History 81: 42-57.  Knox County; settled 1790s; slaves presence documented.

Anderson, Ryan, ed.  2011.  “Appalachia.”  Special issue, Anthropologies: A Collaborative Online Project, Issue 8 (November 1, 2011).  Contents: Introduction: Appalachia / Ryan Anderson -- Biocultural perspectives in Appalachian anthropology / Britteny M. Howell -- Crossing county lines in Appalachia / Ann Kingsolver -- Ain’t no place like home: Appalachia, anthropology, and autoethnography [with five embedded videos] / Tammy L. Clemons -- My life in the field: Why I study Appalachia / Shanna L. Scott -- Cultural industries and invasive species: Ecological threats to handicraft production in Central Appalachia / Amanda Fickey & Lynne Rieske-Kinney -- When stereotype is the research topic: Reflections on working on stigmatizing disease and clarifying critiques among the “last group of people it’s OK to make fun of” / Sarah Raskin -- Landscapes for reclamation, Eastern Kentucky [photos] / Ryan Anderson.  http://www.anthropologiesproject.org/2011/11/issue-8.html.

Bamann, Susan E., et al.  2008.  “Analysis of Site Preservation and Cultural Traditions at 31WK223, A Stratified Archaic to Woodland Period Site in the Eastern Foothills of the Appalachian Mountains” [Reddies River, Wilkes Co.].  North Carolina Archaeology 56: 58-95.

Barnhart, Terry A.  1998.  “In Search of the Mound Builders: The State Archaeological Association of Ohio, 1875-1885.”  Ohio History 107 (Summer-Autumn): 125-170.  http://publications.ohiohistory.org/ohstemplate.cfm?action=toc&vol=107.

Beaman, Thomas E.  2012.  “You Can Go Home Again: A New Look Homeward into the Excavated Cistern of Thomas Wolfe’s “Dixieland.”  North Carolina Archaeology 61 (October): 38-70.  Excavations in 1975 and 1978 yielded 45,661 artifacts which illustrate “consumer consumption patterns in this early twentieth-century uplands setting” [Asheville, N.C., boarding house].

Beck, Robin A., Jr. and Moore, David G.  2002.  “The Burke Phase: A Mississippian Frontier in the North Carolina Foothills” [15th-16th centuries; earthen mounds and ceramics; upper Catawba and Yadkin Rivers].  Southeastern Archaeology 21 (Winter): 192-205.

Blackburn, Marion P.  2009.  “Spain’s Appalachian Outpost” [N.C.; 16th century Spanish settlement destroyed by Native Americans].  Archaeology: A Magazine Dealing with the Antiquity of the World 62, no. 4 (July/August): 38-43.

Broughton, William C.  2012.  “NAGPRA’s Impact on Academic Research in North Carolina and the Southeast.”  North Carolina Archaeology 61 (October): 94-121.  Tables, figures.  Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) of 1990.

Brown, James.  2006.  “Where’s the Power in Mound Building? An Eastern Woodlands Perspective.”  In Leadership and Polity in Mississippian Society, ed. B. Butler and P. Welch, 197-213.  Carbondale: Center for Archaeological Investigations, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale.

Carr, Christopher, and D. Troy Case, ed.  2005.  Gathering Hopewell: Society, Ritual, and Ritual Interaction [Ohio].  Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology.  New York: Kluwer Academic.  807 pp.

Carr, Kurt W., James M. Adovasio, and David R. Pedler.  2001.  “Paleoindian Populations in Trans-Appalachia: The View from Pennsylvania” [12 sites].  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 67-87.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Carstens, Kenneth Charles, and Patty Jo Watson, ed.  1996.  Of Caves and Shell Mounds [Green River Region, Ky.; 14 essays].  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press. 209 pp.

Case, D. Troy, and Christopher Carr.  2008.  The Scioto Hopewell and Their Neighbors: Bioarchaeological Documentation and Cultural Understanding [Ohio].  New York: Springer.  774 pp.

Charles, Douglas K., and Jane E. Buikstra, ed.  2006.  Recreating Hopewell [28 chapters; Section 1: Hopewell in Ohio; Section 2: Hopewell/Middle Woodland outside Ohio; Section 3: New Approaches to Hopewell Material Culture].  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.  657 pp.

Claassen, Cheryl.  2001.  “Engendering Appalachian Archaeology” [feminist perspective].  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 300-305.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Clay, R. Berle.  2009.  “Where Have All the Houses Gone? Webb’s Adena House in Historical Context” [Adena-Hopewell cultures].  Southeastern Archaeology 28, no. 1 (Summer): 43-63.

Cobb, Charles R.  2001.  “Geography, History, and the Appalachian ‘Axis Mundi’” [on the importance of prehistoric upland settings].  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 306-310.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Collins, Michael B.  2006.  “Meadowcroft: Shelter in a Storm” [excavation; 16,000-year-old human settlement].  Western Pennsylvania History 89, no.2 (Summer): 46-51.

Cornette, Alan K.  2005.  Sandstone Chronicles: Rock Art of the Red River Gorge, an Appalachian Journey [Ky.; petroglyphs, cave paintings].  Slade, Ky.: Earth MacroVision, Inc.  282 pp.

Coy, Fred E., Jr., Thomas C. Fuller, Larry G. Meadows, and James L. Swauger.  1996.  Rock Art of Kentucky.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  192 pp.

Cremeens, David L., and Jonathan C. Lothrop.  2001.  “Geomorphology of Upland Regolith in the Unglaciated Appalachian Plateau: Implications for Prehistoric Archaeology” [W.Va.].  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 31-48.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Dancey, William S.  2001.  “An Evolutionary View of Appalachian Archaeology.”  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 311-318.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Dancey, William S., and Paul J. Panchero, ed.  1997.  Ohio Hopewell Community Organization [200 B.C. to 400 A.D.; 15 essays].  Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press.  433 pp.

DeSantis, Larisa R. G.  2007.  “Reconstructing the Ancient Ecology of the Gray Fossil Site in Tennessee.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 23, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 22-24.

DeWeese, Georgina G., W. Jeff Bishop, Henri D. Grissino-Mayer, Brian K. Parrish, and S. Michael Edwards.  2012.  “Dendrochronological Dating of the Chief John Ross House, Rossville, Georgia” [1816-17; Cherokee].  Southeastern Archaeology 31, no. 2 (Winter): 221-230.

Digging Appalachia.  2007.  Special issue, Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 23, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 1-80.  Articles on geology, archaeology, farming, and mountaintop removal.

Drye, Willie.  2004.  “Evidence of 16th-Century Spanish Fort in Appalachia?” [Western N.C.; Fort San Juan, 1566-1568].  National Geographic News, 22 November, 18 paras.  http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2004/11/1122_041122_spanish_fort.html#main.

Dupier, Charles Mayer, Jr.  2000.  “Prehistoric Trails in the Upper Cumberland River Basin” [Ky.].  Filson Club History Quarterly 74 (Fall): 367-382.

Dye, David H., ed.  2008.  Cave Archaeology of the Eastern Woodlands: Essays in Honor of Patty Jo Watson [Ky., Tenn., Mo. sites; rock art; gypsum and saltpeter mining].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  278 pp.

Faulkner, Charles H.  2006.  “An Early Scotch-Irish Family: The Ramsey House Archaeological Project” [Knox Co., 1797].  Journal of East Tennessee History 77, Supplement: 59-64.

Faulkner, Charles H.  2008.  The Ramseys at Swan Pond: The Archaeology and History of an East Tennessee Farm [built 1797; Knoxville region; farm life; material culture; biography].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  168 pp.

Fenton, James P.  2001.  “Early Woodland Burial Mounds of Kentucky: Symbolic Elements in the Cultural Landscape.”  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 137-149.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Fenton, Jim.  2000.  “Environmental Factors, Settlement Patterns, and Prehistoric Occupation on the Allegheny Plateau: Some Lessons Learned” [GIS; Beckley, W.Va.].  In Proceedings, New River Symposium, April 15-16, 1999, Boone, North Carolina, 50-58.  Glen Jean, W.Va.: National Park Service.

Franklin, Jay D.  2007.  “Archaeological Explorations: Rock Shelters and Caves on the Upper Cumberland Plateau of Tennessee.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 23, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 12-13.

Franklin, Jay D., Renee Walker, Maureen A. Hays, and Chase W. Beck.  2010.  “Late Archaic Site Use at Sachsen Cave Shelter, Upper Cumberland Plateau, Tennessee.”  North American Archaeologist 31, no. 3/4: 447-479.

Garrow, Patrick H.  2000.  “Beneath the City: Urban Archaeology in Tennessee” [Knoxville].  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 59 (Fall): 218-231.

Genheimer, Robert A.  2007.  “Birds and the Missing Frog: Animal Effigy Smoking Pipes from Cincinnati’s Madisonville and Turpin Sites.”  Ohio Valley History 7, no. 4 (Winter): 1-14.

Glanville, Jim.  2005.  “Improper Archeology, ‘Fabulous Saltville,’ and the Ancient History of Southwest Virginia” [amateur archaeologists’ findings; maps, tables].  Smithfield Review: Studies in the History of the Region West of the Blue Ridge 9: 55-100.

Glanville, Jim.  2006.  “The Blade from Glade” [steel blade unearthed, Glade Spring, Washington Co., Va.; from West Africa, not Spanish conquistadors].  Smithfield Review: Studies in the History of the Region West of the Blue Ridge 10: 38-47.

Gougeon, Ramie A.  2006.  “Different but the Same: Social Integration of Households in Mississippian Chiefdoms” [northwest Ga.].  In Leadership and Polity in Mississippian Society, ed. B. Butler and P. Welch, 178-194.  Carbondale: Center for Archaeological Investigations, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale.

Gremillion, Kristen J.  2006.  “Central Place Foraging and Food Production on the Cumberland Plateau, Eastern Kentucky” [3000-4000 years ago; North Fork of the Red River].  Chap. 3 in Behavioral Ecology and the Transition to Agriculture, ed. D. Kennett and B. Winterhalder, 41-62.  Origins of Human Behavior and Culture, no. 1.  Berkeley: University of California Press.

Gremillion Kristen J., Jason Windingstad, and Sarah C. Sherwood.  2008.  “Forest Opening, Habitat Use, and Food Production on the Cumberland Plateau, Kentucky: Adaptive Flexibility in Marginal Settings.”  American Antiquity 73, no3 (July): 387-411.

Hally, David J.  2002.  “‘As caves below the ground’: Making Sense of Aboriginal House Form in the Protohistoric Southeast” [Cherokee].  In Between Contacts and Colonies: Archaeological Perspectives on the Protohistoric Southeast, ed. C. Wesson and M. Rees, 90-109.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.

Hally, David J.  2008.  King: The Social Archaeology of a Late Mississippian Town in Northwestern Georgia [King site on the Coosa River].  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  589 pp., plus compact disc containing Appendices A-H.

Hasenstab, Robert J., and William C. Johnson.  2001.  “Hilltops of the Allegheny Plateau: A Preferred Microenvironment for Late Prehistoric Horticulturalists.”  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 3-18.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Hatch, James W., and Gregory H. Bondar.  2001.  “Late Woodland Palisaded Villages from Ontario to the Carolinas: Their Potential for Accurate Population Estimates.”  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 149-167.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Hawley, Marlin F., and David H. Dye.  2011.  “George A. Lidberg Jr. and Depression-Era Archaeology in Tennessee.”  Southeastern Archaeology 30, no. 2 (Winter): 399.  Biography; WPA salvage archaeology program; six sites including Chickamauga basin, 1938-39.

Hedeen, Stanley.  2008.  Big Bone Lick: The Cradle of American Paleontology.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  182 pp.  Fossil site in Boone Co.

Hockensmith, Charles D.  2009.  The Millstone Quarries of Powell County, Kentucky [six quarries; remains documented; records].  Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland.  202 pp.

Hofstra, Warren R., and Karl Raitz.  2010.  “Introduction: The Valley Road in Time and Space.”  In The Great Valley Road of Virginia: Shenandoah Landscapes from Prehistory to the Present, ed. W. Hofstra and K. Raitz, 2-16.  Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.

Jantz, Claire.  2002.  “Cades Cove: Reconstructing Human Impacts on the Environment Before Euro-American Settlement” [Tenn., Great Smoky Mountains National Park].  In Culture, Environment, and Conservation in the Appalachian South, ed. B. Howell, 42-59.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Jefferies, Richard W.  2001.  “Mississippian Settlement in the Cumberland Gap Vicinity” [Ky., Va., Tenn.].  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 198-221.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Jones, Charles Colcock.  [1873] 1999.  Antiquities of the Southern Indians, Particularly of the Georgia Tribes. Reprint, edited with an introduction by Frank T. Schnell. Classics in Southeastern Archaeology.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  534 pp.  Originally published: New York: D. Appleton and Co.

Kimball, Larry R., Thomas R. Whyte, and Gary D. Crites.  2010.  “The Biltmore Mound and Hopewellian Mound Use in the Southern Appalachians.”  Southeastern Archaeology 29, no. 1 (Summer): 44-58.  On the  Swannanoa River, Asheville, N.C.

King, Adam.  2003.  Etowah: The Political History of a Chiefdom Capital [mid-1500s, northern Ga.].  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  216 pp.

King, Adam.  2006.  “Leadership Strategies and the Nature of Mississippian Chiefdoms in Northern Georgia.”  In Leadership and Polity in Mississippian Society, ed. B. Butler and P. Welch, 73-90.  Carbondale: Center for Archaeological Investigations, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale.

Lambert, Patricia M.  2002.  “Bioarchaeology at Coweeta Creek: Continuity and Change in Native Health and Lifeways in Protohistoric Western North Carolina” [Macon Co.; Cherokee; 13th-18th centuries].  Southeastern Archaeology 21 (Summer): 36-48.

Lane, Leon, and David G. Anderson.  2001.  “Paleoindian Occupations of the Southern Appalachians: A View from the Cumberland Plateau of Kentucky and Tennessee.”  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 88-102.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Lapham, Heather A.  2005.  Hunting for Hides: Deerskins, Status, and Cultural Change in the Protohistoric Appalachians.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  184 pp.

Lawler, Andrew.  2006.  “Spain Makes a Stand” [1560s Spanish Fort San Juan excavation; near Morganton, N.C.].  Smithsonian 36, no. 12 (March): 33-34.

Lewis, R. Barry, ed.  1996.  Kentucky Archaeology.  Perspectives on Kentucky’s Past, Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  289 pp.

Matthews, Larry E.  2006.  Big Bone Cave [Tenn.; history].  Huntsville, Ala: National Speleological Society.  220 pp.

Means, Bernard K.  2007.  Circular Villages of the Monongahela Tradition [Southwestern Pa., and contiguous W.Va., Ohio, and Md.].  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  196 pp.

Milner, George R.  2004.  The Moundbuilders: Ancient Peoples of Eastern North America.  New York: Thames & Hudson.  224 pp.

Moore, Harry.  2004.  The Bone Hunters: The Discovery of Miocene Fossils in Gray, Tennessee [near Johnson City; highway project].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  102 pp.

Moore, Harry.  2007.  “Highways and Bones” [prehistoric animal bones uncovered in highway construction; SR 75, Gray, Tenn., May 2000].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 23, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 18-21.

Myers, Maureen S.  2006.  “Leadership at the Edge” [southwestern Va./northeastern Tenn.].  In Leadership and Polity in Mississippian Society, ed. B. Butler and P. Welch, 156-177.  Carbondale: Center for Archaeological Investigations, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale.

Nass, John P.  2001.  “Subsistence-Settlement Change and Continuity in Western Pennsylvania” [and Upper Ohio Valley].  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 177-197.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Peres, Tanya M.  2008.  “Foodways, Economic Status, and the Antebellum Upland South in Central Kentucky.”  Historical Archaeology 42, no. 4: 88-104.

Prezzano, Susan C., and Christina B. Rieth.  2001.  “Late Prehistoric Cultures of the Upper Susquehanna Valley” [N.Y., Pa.].  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 168-176.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Pritchard, Erin E., ed.  2009.  TVA Archaeology: Seventy-Five Years of Prehistoric Site Research.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  352 pp.  Contents: TVA: built for the people of the United States / Patricia Bernard Ezzell -- In the beginning... / Danny E. Olinger and A. Eric Howard -- The Normandy Archaeological Project / Charles H. Faulkner -- The Tellico Archaeological Project / Gerald F. Schroedl -- The geoarchaeology of the Tennessee Valley: methodological and archaeological milestones / Sarah C. Sherwood -- Viewing Jonathan Creek through ceramics and radiocarbon dates: regional prominence in the thirteenth century / Sissel Schroeder -- Archaeological time constructs and the construction of Hiwassee Island mound / Lynne P. Sullivan -- Prehistoric cave art sites and TVA: an update on Painted Bluff, 1st and 18th unnamed caves / Jan Simek, Sarah A. Blankenship, and Alan Cressler -- The Dust Cave Archaeological Project, Lauderdale County, Alabama / Boyce N. Driskell -- Understanding cultural pattern and process in the Tennessee River Valley: the role of cultural resource management investigations in archaeological research / Scott C. Meeks -- The future of archaeology and stewardship at TVA / Erin E. Pritchard.

Prufer, Olaf H., Sara E. Pedde, and Richard S. Meindl, ed.  2001.  Archaic Traditions in Ohio and Kentucky Prehistory [8000-1000 B.C.].  Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press.  359 pp.

Rafferty, Sean M., and Rob Mann, ed.  2004.  Smoking and Culture: The Archaeology of Tobacco Pipes in Eastern North America [Native American].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  324 pp.

Rodning, Christopher B.  2001.  “Architecture and Landscape in Late Prehistoric Western North Carolina.”  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 238-249.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Rodning, Christopher B.  2002.  “William Bartram and the Archaeology of the Appalachian Summit” [Cherokee communities].  In Between Contacts and Colonies: Archaeological Perspectives on the Protohistoric Southeast, ed. C. Wesson and M. Rees, 67-89.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.

Rodning, Christopher B.  2008.  “Temporal Variation in Qualla Pottery at Coweeta Creek” [1300-1838].  North Carolina Archaeology 57: 1-49.

Rodning, Christopher B.  2009.  “Domestic Houses at Coweeta Creek” [1600s].  Southeastern Archaeology 28, no. 1 (Summer): 1-26.  Cherokee structures, Coweeta Creek site, upper Little Tennessee Valley, southwestern N.C.

Rodning, Christopher B.  2009.  “Mounds, Myths, and Cherokee Townhouses in Southwestern North Carolina” [1560-1720].  American Antiquity 74, no. 4 (October): 627-663.

Rodning, Christopher B.  2010.  “Architectural Symbolism and Cherokee Townhouses.”  Southeastern Archaeology 29, no. 1 (Summer): 59-79.  Coweeta Creek site, southwestern N.C.

Rodning Christopher B.  2011.  “Cherokee Townhouses: Architectural Adaptation to European Contact in the Southern Appalachians” [17th-18th centuries].  North American Archaeologist 32, no. 2: 131-190.

Rodning Christopher B.  2011.  “Mortuary Practices, Gender Ideology, and the Cherokee Town at the Coweeta Creek Site.”  Journal of Anthropological Archaeology  30, no. 2 (June): 145-173.  Upper Little Tennessee Valley in southwestern North Carolina, 15th through 18th centuries.

Rodning, Christopher B.  2012.  “Late Prehistoric and Protohistoric Shell Gorgets from Southwestern North Carolina” [Cherokee mythology].  Southeastern Archaeology 31, no. 1 (Summer): 33-56.  Tables; maps; figures.

Rodning, Christopher B., and Amber M. VanDerwarker.  2002.  “Revisiting Coweeta Creek: Reconstructing Ancient Cherokee Lifeways in Southwestern North Carolina.”  Southeastern Archaeology 21 (Summer): 1-9.

Rodning, Christopher B., and David G. Moore.  2010.  “South Appalachian Mississippian and Protohistoric Mortuary Practices in Southwestern North Carolina.”  Southeastern Archaeology 29, no. 1 (Summer): 80-100.  Warren Wilson, Garden Creek, and Coweeta Creek sites.

Romain, William F.  2009.  Shamans of the Lost World: A Cognitive Approach to the Prehistoric Religion of the Ohio Hopewell.  Lanham, Md.: AltaMira Press.  261 pp.

Sassaman, Kenneth E.  2001.  “Articulating Hidden Histories of the Mid-Holocene in the Southern Appalachians.”  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 103-120.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Schroedl, Gerald F.  2000.  “Cherokee Ethnohistory and Archaeology from 1540 to 1838” [Ga., S.C., Tenn., N.C.].  In Indians of the Greater Southeast: Historical Archaeology and Ethnohistory, ed. B. McEwan, 204-241.  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.

Schroedl, Gerald F.  2001.  “Cherokee Archaeology since the 1970s.”  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 278-297.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Schroedl, Gerald F.  2002.  “The Complimentary Roles of Research, Cultural Resource Management, and Public Outreach in the Chattooga Archaeological Project” [Oconee Co., S.C.; Cherokee].  In Culture, Environment, and Conservation in the Appalachian South, ed. B. Howell, 153-169.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Scofield, David.  2006.  “Legacy of the Land” [Meadowcroft Rockshelter landscape; 16,000-year-old cave; Washington Co., Pa.].  Western Pennsylvania History 89, no. 2 (Summer): 10-15.

Simek, Jan F., and Alan Cressler.  2005.  “Images in Darkness: Prehistoric Cave Art in Southeastern North America” [27 sites considered].  Chap. 4 in Discovering North American Rock Art, ed. L. Loendorf, C. Chippindale, and D. Whitley, 93-113.  Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

Simek, Jan F., Susan R. Frankenberg, and Charles H. Faulkner.  2001.  “Toward an Understanding of Prehistoric Cave Art in Southern Appalachia” [Ky., Tenn., Ga., Ala.].  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 49-64.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Smith, Kevin E., and James V. Miller.  2009.  Speaking With the Ancestors: Mississippian Stone Statuary of the Tennessee-Cumberland Region [figurines; Tenn., Ky., north Ga.].  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  234 pp.

Spurlock, Linda B., Olaf H. Prufer, and Thomas R. Pigott, ed.  2006.  Caves and Culture: 10,000 Years of Ohio History [17 chapters; rockshelters, southeastern Ohio].  Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press.  463 pp.

Steere, Benjamin A., Paul A. Webb, and Bruce S. Idol.  2012.  “A ‘New’ Account of Mound and Village Sites in Western North Carolina: The Travels of Captain R. D. Wainwright.”  North Carolina Archaeology 61 (October): 1-37.  Amateur archaeologist Wainright’s narratives of surface exacavations, 1913-1914, plus an overview of archaeological research, 1870s-1933.

Sullivan, Lynne P.  2006.  “Gendered Contexts of Mississippian Leadership in Southern Appalachia” [East Tenn.].  In Leadership and Polity in Mississippian Society, ed. B. Butler and P. Welch, 264-285.  Carbondale: Center for Archaeological Investigations, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale.

Sullivan, Lynne P., and Susan C. Prezzano, ed.  2001.  Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands [23 chapters].  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  410 pp.

Sullivan, Lynne P., and Susan C. Prezzano.  2001.  “A Conscious Appalachian Archaeology”  [cultural diversity, marginality, traditions, landscape]. In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 323-331.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Sullivan, Lynne P., and Susan C. Prezzano.  2001.  “Introduction: The Concept of Appalachian Archaeology.”  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, xix-xxxiii.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Sullivan, Lynne P., Bobby R. Braly, Michaelyn S. Harle, and Shannon D. Koerner.  2011.  “Remembering New Deal Archaeology in the Southeast: A Legacy in Museum Collections.”  In Museums and Memory: Selected Papers from the Annual Meeting of the Southern Anthropological Society, Staunton, Virginia, March, 2008, ed. M. Huber, 65-108.  Knoxville, Tenn.: Newfound Press.

Tipton, J. Ann.  2007.  “Treasure Hunter Finds British Coin Dated 1743” [Holston River, Tenn.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 23, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 61-62.  Reprinted from the Kingsport Times-News, 28 Aug 2005.

Tushingham, Shannon, Jane Hill, and Charles H. McNutt, ed.  2002.  Histories of Southeastern Archeology [individual state histories].  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  384 pp.

VanDerwarker, Amber M., and Kandace R. Detwiler.  2002.  “Gendered Practice in Cherokee Foodways: A Spatial Analysis of Plant Remains from the Coweeta Creek Site” [N.C.].  Southeastern Archaeology 21 (Summer): 21-28.

Versaggi, Nina M., LouAnn Wurst, T. Cregg Madrigal, and Andrea Lain.  2001.  “Adding Complexity to Late Archaic Research in the Northeastern Appalachians.”  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 121-133.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Walker, Renee B.  2002.  “Early Holocene Ecological Adaptations in North Alabama.”  In Culture, Environment, and Conservation in the Appalachian South, ed. B. Howell, 21-41.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Wallace, Steven.  2007.  “Why Is It Called the ‘Rhino Pit’?” [unearthing an ancient rhinoceros family; Gray Fossil Site; Tenn.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 23, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 25-28.

Waselkov, Gregory A., and Marvin T. Smith.  2000.  “Upper Creek Archaeology” [Ala.].  In Indians of the Greater Southeast: Historical Archaeology and Ethnohistory, ed. B. McEwan, 242-264.  Gainesville: University Press of Florida.

Watson, Patty Jo.  2001.  “Ridges, Rises, and Rocks; Caves, Coves, Terraces, and Hollows: Appalachian Archaeology at the Millennium.”  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 319-322.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Welch, Paul D.  2001.  “Political Economy in Late Prehistoric Southern Appalachia.”  In Archaeology of the Appalachian Highlands, ed. L. Sullivan and S. Prezzano, 222-238.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Whyte, Thomas R.  2007.  “Proto-Iroquoian Divergence in the Late Archaic-Early Woodland Period Transition of the Appalachian Highlands.”  Southeastern Archaeology 26, no. 1 (Summer): 134-144.  “...the linguistic separation of Cherokee and Northern Iroquois, is estimated to have begun almost 4,000 years ago. Linguistic and molecular studies are consistent with a proto-Iroquoian homeland in the Appalachian region.”

Whyte, Thomas R., Scott A. Fleeman, and Cathleen D. Evans.  2011.  “An Alternative Ontology and Experimental Study of Pottery Punctation in Southern Appalachian Region Prehistory.”  Southeastern Archaeology 30, no. 2 (Winter): 390-398.  “Feathers of various birds may have been used.”

Wilson, Gregory D., and Christopher B. Rodning.  2002.  “Boiling, Baking, and Pottery Breaking: A Functional Analysis of Ceramic Vessels from Coweeta Creek” [Macon Co. N.C.; Cherokee].  Southeastern Archaeology 21 (Summer): 29-35.

Wilson, Gregory D., Jon Marcoux, and Brad Koldehoff.  2006.  “Square Pegs in Round Holes: Organizational Diversity Between Early Moundville and Cahokia” [Ala.; Ill.].  In Leadership and Polity in Mississippian Society, ed. B. Butler and P. Welch, 43-72.  Carbondale: Center for Archaeological Investigations, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale.

Woodall, J. Ned.  2009.  “The T. Jones Site: Ecology and Agency in the Upper Yadkin Valley of North Carolina” [Wilkes Co.].  North Carolina Archaeology 58 (October): 1-58.  Occupation dates between AD 1400 and 1600.

Woodward, Susan L., and Jerry N. McDonald.  2001.  Indian Mounds of the Middle Ohio Valley: A Guide to Mounds and Earthworks of the Adena, Hopewell, Cole, and Fort Ancient People [Ind., Ky., Oh., W.Va.].  Second edition.  Blacksburg, Va.: McDonald & Woodward.  304 pp.