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Agriculture and Land Use

Mountain farms, gardening, ginseng, absentee landowners.

 

Adams, Alison O.  2011.  “A Mess of Poke” [online essay; photos; sound clip].  Southern Spaces: An Interdisciplinary Journal about Regions, Places, and Cultures of the American South and Their Global Connections, 17 October 2011.  “Adams discusses perceptions of poke and her experiences preparing the dish.”  Recommended Resources include Harlan, Ky. Poke Sallet Festival.  http://www.southernspaces.org/2011/mess-poke.

Alexander, Bill.  2011.  “History on the Road: Asheville, North Carolina, and the Cradle of Forestry.”  Forest History Today 17 (Spring-Fall): 103-109.

Algeo, Katie.  1997.  “The Rise of Tobacco as a Southern Appalachian Staple: Madison County, North Carolina” [1870s to present].  Southeastern Geographer 37 (May): 46-60.

Amberg, Rob.  1997.  “Tobacco: ‘...You Had to Do Something to Live...’: An Interview with Dellie Norton” [1899?-1993; Madison County, N.C.].  In May We All Remember Well: A Journal of the History & Cultures of Western North Carolina, Vol. 1 , ed. R. S. Brunk, 124-137.  Asheville, N.C.: Robert S. Brunk Auction Services Inc.

Anderson, Annette.  2002.  “Pittman Center, Tennessee: Planning with Citizens for Sustainable Development” [least developed gateway to Great Smoky Mountains].  In Culture, Environment, and Conservation in the Appalachian South, ed. B. Howell, 182-193.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Anderson, Belinda.  1999.  “Going to the State Fair with the Tuckwillers: ‘Something for Everybody’” [Greenbrier Co.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 25 (Summer): 30-39.

Atkins, Anna B. Shue.  1999.  “‘She Didn’t Go Sangin’ Alone!’” [Droop Mountain; herb gathering; reminiscence].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 25 (Fall): 27-29.

Ball, Donald B.  2007.  “The History and Use of Tub Mills in Southern Appalachia” [traditional material culture; a small, vertical water mill with blades radiating outward; water flow strikes horizontally, not dropping vertically; diagrams, photos, references].  Tennessee Folklore Society Bulletin 63, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 3-55.

Ball, Donald B.  2008.  “Notes on the Use of Tubmills in Southern Appalachia.” Material Culture 40, no. 2: 1-20.  Late 19-century transplantation from Europe.

Barnett, Janice Willis.  2011.  “Getting Green at Celo” [1,200-acre tract in Yancy Co., N.C.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 1 (Summer): 20-22.  Subsistence farming land trust founded in 1937 as a Utopian community.

Barringer, Felicity.  2005.  “In Appalachia, Stalking the Wild Ginseng Gets Tougher” [declining harvests].  New York Times, 7 May, 10(A).

Bartemes, David W.  2001.  “Don Bosco: Agricultural Education in Randolph County” [1950s reminiscences of a 500-acre vocational working farm and rural Catholic school run by priests].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 27 (Spring): 32-37.

Beeson, Lillian Poe.  2000.  “Butchering as Ritual” [hog butchering; Barbour Co.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 26 (Winter): 58-61.

Berry, Wendell.  2003.  “Going to Work” [“virtues of humility, reverence, proper scale, and good workmanship”].  In The Essential Agrarian Reader: The Future of Culture, Community, and the Land, ed. N. Wirzba, 259-266.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Berry, Wendell.  2003.  “The Agrarian Standard.”  In The Essential Agrarian Reader: The Future of Culture, Community, and the Land, ed. N. Wirzba, 23-33.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Berry, Wendell.  2003.  Citizenship Papers [19 essays].  Washington, D.C.: Shoemaker & Hoard. 189 pp.

Berry, Wendell.  2004.  “A Citizen and a Native: An Interview with Wendell Berry” [on his Ky. farm].  Interview by Jim Minick.  Appalachian Journal (Spring/Summer): 300-313.

Berry, Wendell.  2005.  The Way of Ignorance: And Other Essays.  Emeryville, Calif.: Shoemaker & Hoard.  180 pp.

Berry, Wendell.  2010.  Bringing It to the Table: On Farming and Food.  Introduction by Michael Pollan.  Berkeley, Calif.: Counterpoint.  234 pp.  Family farms, sustainable agriculture, and excerpts from his novels and stories.

Best, Bill.  1998.  “Heirloom Beans” [merits of; 18 types characterized].  Appalachian Heritage 26 (Winter): 6-14.

Best, Bill.  1998.  “Heirloom Tomatoes” [types, varieties, anecdotes].  Appalachian Heritage 26 (Fall): 19-29.

Best, Bill.  2000.  “Returning to Sustainability in Appalachia” [insights; rules].  Appalachian Heritage 28 (Winter): 21-28.

Best, Bill.  2007.  “Growing Greasy Cut-Shorts” [heirloom beans].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 23, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 75-77.

Best, Bill.  2010.  “A Descent from the Beanstalk?”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 26, no. 1 (Summer): 28-29.  In this allegory involving Jack and the Giant [corporations “San Monto,” “Agra Con,” and “Gill Car,” chauffeured by the Supreme Court], heirloom seed champion Bill Best takes aim at corporate farms, genetic modification of food, and pesticide use.

Best, Michael.  1998.  “Sustainable Agriculture for Appalachia” [cultural, environmental, and financial factors].  Appalachian Heritage 26 (Fall): 30-33.

Best, Michael.  2000.  “Direct Marketing Hogs in Southern Appalachia.”  Appalachian Heritage 28 (Fall): 13-17.

Best, Michael, and Curtis W. Wood, section editors.  2006.  “Agriculture” [signed entries].  In Encyclopedia of Appalachia, ed. R. Abramson and J. Haskell, 396-439 (with introductory essay, 396-402).  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Billings, Dwight, and Kathleen M. Blee.  1995.  “Agriculture and Poverty in the Kentucky Mountains: Beech Creek, 1850-1910.”  In Appalachia in the Making: The Mountain South in the Nineteenth Century, ed. M. Pudup, D. Billings, and A. Waller, 233-269.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Birdsall, Stephen S.  2001.  “Tobacco Farmers and Landscape Change in North Carolina’s Old Belt Region.”  Southeastern Geographer 41 (May): 65-73.

Black, Jane.  2011.  “Local Food Has Been No Easy Sell in Appalachia.”  New York Times, 27 June, 5(D).  1,323 words.  Harvest Table restaurant, Meadowview, Va., buys only local produce, meat, and cheese.

Black, Kate.  2010.  “Kentucky Garden Stories: Planting Resistance” [from interviews].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 16, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 122-130.  The author confronts stereotypes and observes that vegetable gardeners “are center stage in an unfolding national drama about health, sustainability, and environmental and corporate responsibility.”

Black, Kate.  2012.  “Tom Collins: A Mother’s Beans.”  Appalachian Heritage 40, no. 4 (Fall): 90-92.  Essay on a mountain gardener, Breathitt County, Ky.

Bourne, Joel.  2000.  “On the Trail of the ‘Sang Poachers” [ginseng].  Audubon 102 (March/April): 84-90.

Boyer, Jefferson C.  2006.  “Reinventing the Appalachian Commons”  Social Analysis 50, no. 3 (Winter): 217-232.  Resource sharing and social reciprocity; from a forum on “The Global Idea of The Commons.”

Brunn, Stanley D.  2001.  “Citizen Reaction to a Proposed Time Zone Boundary Change in Kentucky: Juxtaposing Boundaries on the Land / In the Mind” [Wayne Co.].  Southeastern Geographer 41 (November): 246-258.

Buckley, Geoffrey L., Timothy G. Anderson, and Nancy R. Bain.  2000.  “Living on the Fringe: A Geographic Profile of Appalachian Ohio.”  In A Geographic Perspective of Pittsburgh and the Alleghenies: From Precambrian to Post-Industrial, ed. K. Patrick and J. Scarpaci, 140-147.  Washington, D.C.: Association of American Geographers.

Campbell, Brian C.  2010.  “‘Closest to Everlastin’: Ozark Agricultural Biodiversity and Subsistence Traditions” [online essay; photos].  Southern Spaces: An Interdisciplinary Journal about Regions, Places, and Cultures of the American South and Their Global Connections, 20 September.  Contents: Introduction | The Biophysical Geography of the Ozark Highlands | Willodean: Ozark Subsistence Traditions in the Present | Corn (Zea Mays), an Ozark Staple | Agroecological Knowledge | The Future of Ozark Subsistence and Agricultural Biodiversity | Recommended Resources.  http://www.southernspaces.org/2010/closest-everlastin-ozark-agricultural-biodiversity-and-subsistence-traditions.

Carlisle, Fred.  1999.  “Mark Givens: The Last Full-Time Farmer in Clover Hollow” [Giles Co., Va.; profile].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 16 (Summer): 12-16.

Chesky, Anne.  2009.  “Can Agritourism Save the Family Farm in Appalachia? A Study of Two Historic Family Farms in Valle Crucis, North Carolina.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 15, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 87-98.

Chesky, Anne.  2012.  “Creating Community Connections: Saving an Historically Agrarian Town on the Cusp of Suburbanization” [Riceville Valley, near Asheville, N.C.].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 18, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 220-233.  Explores the ideological gaps between land-owning old-timers and newcomers who want to save the land from development.

Clayton, Richard R.  1995.  Marijuana in the “Third World”: Appalachia, U.S.A.  Prepared for the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development, Geneva, and the United Nations University, Tokyo.  Studies on the Impact of the Illegal Drug Trade, vol. 5.  Boulder, Colo.: Lynn Rienner Publishers.  123 pp.

Coggeshall, John M.  2011.  “Menace and Majesty: The Jocassee Gorges Region of Upper South Carolina.”  In Museums and Memory: Selected Papers from the Annual Meeting of the Southern Anthropological Society, Staunton, Virginia, March, 2008, ed. M. Huber, 167-179.  Knoxville, Tenn.: Newfound Press.  Cultural meaning of the land; wilderness vs. development.

Colyer, Dale.  2001.  “Changes in Appalachian Agriculture: 1965-2000” [county outline maps; tables].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 7 (Fall): 349-374.

Cooke, David, and Christopher Porter.  2011.  “Halting the Patterns of Loss: Grow Appalachia’s First Season.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 1 (Summer): 25-28.  Bountiful rural community gardening project, Growing Appalachia, began as a partnership between five Ky. nonprofit groups.

Copenhaver, Ben.  2010.  “Ginseng: Digging for Treasure in Brooke County.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 36, no. 3 (Fall): 59-61.

Copenheaver, Carolyn A., et al. 2007.  “The Geography of Grist, Flour, and Saw Mills: Indicators of Land Use in Virginia”  [Giles Co.; tables, maps].  Southeastern Geographer 47, no. 1 (May): 138-154.  Eighteen grist and flour mills, and 26 saw mills identified; operated 1800-1950.

Core, Earl L.  [1975] 1999.  “Goldenseal” [medicinal herb].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 25 (Fall): 22-23.  Reprint, originally published: vol. 1, no. 1.

Crawford, Martin.  1994.  “Mountain Farmers and the Market Economy: Ashe County During the 1850s.”  North Carolina Historical  Review 71 (October): 430-450.

Davis, Donald Edward.  2005.  “Homeplace Geography” [West Chickamauga Valley roots, Catoosa Co., Ga.; family landmarks lost to modernization].  In Crossroads: A Southern Culture Annual, ed. Ted Olson, 4-13.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.

Davis, Emili.  1996.  “Bob Massee: ‘I Was Born in the Apple Business’.”  Foxfire Magazine 30 (Fall/Winter): 107-118.  Rabun Co., Ga.; orchards.

Davis, Jenna, Howard Prater, and George Prater.  1999.  “The Praters’ Bees” [Rabun Co., Ga.; interview with beekeepers].  Foxfire Magazine 33 (Spring/Summer): 68-76.

Dickerson, Leah, Beth Shirley, and Laurence Holden.  1999.  “Barker’s Creek Grist Mill Revisited” [Rabun Co., Ga.; student interview with Holden who explains the milling process].  Foxfire Magazine 33 (Spring/Summer): 49-53.

Dolney, Timothy J.  2007.  “Land Use Patterns and Their Proximity to Abandoned Mine Lands in the State of Pennsylvania” [30,000 AMLs; tables, maps].  Pennsylvania Geographer 45, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 80-98.

Donegia, Wayman A.  2007.  “How We Fed Ourselves Back Then: Eating Well in Barbour County” [Depression-era, 40-acre family farm].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 33, no. 2 (Summer): 26-31.

Duncan, Barbara R.  1997.  “American Ginseng in Western North Carolina: A Cross-Cultural Examination” [Cherokee; European; Appalachian; African-American].  In May We All Remember Well: A Journal of the History & Cultures of Western North Carolina, Vol. 1, ed. R. S. Brunk, 201-213.  Asheville, N.C.: Robert S. Brunk Auction Services Inc.

Ellenberg, George B.  2007.  Mule South to Tractor South: Mules, Machines, and the Transformation of the Cotton South [history of the mule].  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  219 pp.

Engelhardt, Elizabeth.  2009.  “The Henderson County Curb Market at Eighty-Five” [N.C.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 25, no.1 (Spring/Summer): 20-23.

Enman, John A.  2009.  “Pennsylvania County Borders: Plain and Fancy.”  Pennsylvania Geographer 47, no. 1 (Spring-Summer): 103-119.  Natural feature determinants of county borders, 1798-1878.

Eskridge, Anna E., and Derek H. Alderman.  2010.  “Alien Invaders, Plant Thugs, and the Southern Curse: Framing Kudzu as Environmental Other through Discourses of Fear.”  Southeastern Geographer 50, no. 1 (Spring): 110-129.

Eslinger, Ellen.  2009.  “Farming on the Kentucky Frontier” [eighteenth-century; crops, livestock, diet, and farm implements].  Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 107, no. 1 (Winter): 3-32.

Falck, Zachary.  2010.  “Keystone Cuisine: Mushrooms from Underground Farms” [Butler and Armstrong Cos.].  Pennsylvania History 93, no. 4 (Winter 2010-11): 9-11.  The nation’s largest single grower since the 1960s; “Moonlight Mushrooms” brand; grown in abandoned limestone mines.

Feather, Carl E.  2001.  “A Fence Full of Apples: Espalier in Sistersville” [orchards].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 27 (Fall): 19-21.

Feather, Carl E.  2001.  “Apple Royalty: Berkeley County’s Miller Family” [apple orcharding history].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 27 (Fall): 6-13.

Feather, Carl E.  2001.  “Heirloom Apples” [Raleigh Co.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 27 (Summer): 14-18.

Feather, Carl E.  2008.  “Pressing Cider in Preston County.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 34, no. 3 (Fall): 64-66.  Old timers hand press 100 bushels of Golden Delicious and Stayman apples purchased in Romney.  Newburg Rotary Club; 30-year tradition.

Feather, Carl E.  2010.  “‘Farmer Lessons’ in Preston County.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 36, no. 4 (Winter): 64-65.  Farmsteading with neighbors’ help and raising alpacas.

Feather, Carl E.  2010.  “The Great Pumpkin of Preston County.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 36, no. 3 (Fall): 66-67.  State prize-winner, 1,021 pounds.

Feather, Carl E.  2011.  “‘We’re Very Blessed’: Sweet Life at Laurel Fork Farm” [Tucker Co.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 37, no. 1 (Spring): 16-21.  Eighteen years of homesteading and self-sufficiency on 175 acres.

Feather, Carl E.  2011.  “Selling Daylilies in Bunker Hill” [Berkeley Co. nursery].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 37, no. 2 (Summer): 66-67.

Ferleger, Louis A., and John D. Metz.  2006.  “‘Goods, Chattels, Lands and Tenements’: Probate and the Pattern of Material Culture in Three Upland Georgia Counties, 1880-1910” [Crawford, Franklin and Jackson Cos.].  Georgia Historical Quarterly 90, no. 4 (Winter): 525-546.

Filipiak, Jeffrey.  2011.  “The Work of Local Culture: Wendell Berry and Communities as the Source of Farming Knowledge.”  Agricultural History 85, no. 2 (Spring): 174-194.

Fischer, Karin.  2009.  “Notes from Academe: In Appalachia, a Researcher Makes Honey from Coal” [Eastern Ky.; beekeeping project on reclaimed mine sites].  Chronicle of Higher Education, 15 November.  http://chronicle.com/article/In-Appalachia-a-Researcher/49141/?sid=wb&utm_source=wb&utm_medium=en.

Forestry in the South [six articles].  2002.  Guest editor, Don Voth.  Southern Rural Sociology 18, no. 2: 1-131.

Garrett, Martin A., Jr.  1998.  “Evidence on the Use of Oxen in the Postbellum South” [farming and timbering].  Social Science History 22 (Summer): 225-249.

Gerstell, Richard.  1998.  American Shad in the Susquehanna River Basin: A Three-Hundred Year History [conservation and cultural history; Pa., N.Y., Md.].  University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.  217 pp.

Gervich, Curt D., Max Stephensen, Jr., and  Marc J. Stern.  2012.  “Exploring Producers’, Staff Members’, and Board Members’ Cognitive Frame on Decision Making in an Appalachian Organic Farming Venture.”  Journal of Rural Social Sciences 27, no. 1: 52–83.  Blue Ridge Sustainability Forum; Blue Mountain Organic Vegetables (BMOV).  http://www.ag.auburn.edu/auxiliary/srsa/pages/TOCs/JRSS%20vol27-1.htm.

Grantham, Kelli.  1998.  “The Butternut Tree” [fungal disease-threatened; interview with three forestry researchers].  Foxfire Magazine 32 (Spring/Summer): 10-16.

Gray, Elmer.  1999.  “Preservation and Utilization of Appalachian Crop Germ Plasm” [case for Appalachian seed bank].  Appalachian Heritage 27 (Fall): 35-43.

Gregg, Sara M.  2004.  “Uncovering the Subsistence Economy in the Twentieth-Century South: Blue Ridge Mountain Farms” [challenges critical 1929 study; defends farmers’ agricultural methods].  Agricultural History 78, no. 4 (Fall): 417-437.

Gregory, Michael M.  2002.  “Exploring 250 Years of Land Use in Western Virginia: Viewing a Landscape through Artifacts, Documents, and Oral History” [Denmark community of Rockbridge Co.].  In Culture, Environment, and Conservation in the Appalachian South, ed. B. Howell, 60-81.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Groover, Mark D.  2003.  An Archaeological Study of Rural Capitalism and Material Life: The Gibbs Farmstead in Southern Appalachia, 1790-1920 [Knox Co., Tenn.; four generations].  Contributions to Global Historical Archaeology.  New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers.  320 pp.

Hahn, Steven.  [1983] 2006.  The Roots of Southern Populism: Yeoman Farmers and the Transformation of the Georgia Upcountry, 1850-1890.  Rev. ed.  New York: Oxford University Press.  354 pp.

Hall, James Baker, and Wendell Berry.  2004.  Tobacco Harvest: An Elegy [duotone photographs, 1973 Henry Co., Ky.].  Photographs by James Baker Hall; essay by Wendell Berry.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  78 pp.

Halweil, Brian.  2003.  “The Smoke Clears: Ex-Tobacco Farmers Kick the Habit and Go Organic.” E Magazine: The Environmental Magazine 14 (July/August): 23-25.

Halweil, Brian.  2003.  “This Old Barn, This New Money” [shift to organic crops by tobacco farmers; Appalachian Sustainable Development, nonprofit group].  World Watch 16 (July/August): 24-29.

Harless, Marion.  1999.  “In Search of Wild Goldenseal” [yellowroot].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 25 (Fall): 24-26.

Harmon, Carolyn.  2007.  “Tending the Herd in Jackson County: Mitzie Rival and Her Goats.” Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 33, no. 2 (Summer): 32-37.

Hatch, Elvin.  2003.  “Delivering the Goods: Cash, Subsistence Farms, and Identity in a Blue Ridge County in the 1930s” [N.C.].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 9 (Spring): 6-47.

Henson, Zachary, and Conner Bailey.  2009.  “CAFOs, Culture and Conflict on Sand Mountain: Framing Rights and Responsibilities in Appalachian Alabama” [Large Confined Animal Feed Operations].  Southern Rural Sociology  24, no. 1: 153-174.  http://www.ag.auburn.edu/auxiliary/srsa/pages/TOCs/vol24-1.htm.

Herrin, Roberta.  2007.  “The Husk of Wildness” [gathering ground cherries and digging potatoes].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 23, no. 2 (Fall/Winter): 2-3.

Hillman, Jimmye S.  2012.  Hogs, Mules, and Yellow Dogs: Growing Up on a Mississippi Subsistence Farm [b. 1923; Greene Co., southern Miss.].  Foreword by Robert Hass.  Tucson: University of Arizona Press.  267 pp.  Not Appalachian, but many parallels.

Hopkins, James F.  [1951] 1998.  A History of the Hemp Industry in Kentucky [1840s peak; updated bibliography].  Foreword by Thomas D. Clark.  Reprint.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Hopp, Steven.  2008.  “Tending Community: An Interview with Steven Hopp.”  Interview by Jim Minick.  Appalachian Heritage, 36, no. 4 (Fall): 76-81.  Hopp is the husband of Barbara Kingsolver and co-author, with his wife and daughter, of the book Animal, Vegetable, Miracle (2007).

Hopp, Steven.  2009.  “‘Invent Something Local’: An Interview with Steven Hopp,” by Jim Minick.  Appalachian Journal 36, no. 3/4 (Spring/Summer): 200-214.  Hopp, of Washington Co., Va., and husband of Barbara Kingsolver, has created the Meadowview Farmers’ Guild to build a local economy network sourcing local food and products, as an alternative to corporate controlled, big box chain stores and restaurants.

Howell, Eck.  1998.  “‘We Drove Cattle from Beverly to Osceola’” [1930s].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 24 (Summer): 51-55.

Hundley, Kathy O. Smith.  2004.  “Guy Kelley: The Beekeeper of Bloomingrose” [Boone Co.; 55 years experience].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 30 (Summer): 38-45.

Huso, Deborah R.  2003.  “The Taste of Earth” [in praise of Blue Ridge family farmlife].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 20 (Spring): 22-23.

Jarrell, Tracy Turner.  2011.  “‘Sheep!’ Sheep Production in Watauga and Ashe Counties in North Carolina from the 1930s to Now.”  Appalachian Journal 38, no. 4 (Summer): 362-407.  Revised version of a paper that won the 2010 Carl Ross Award for best student essay from the Appalachian Studies Association; and includes additional research from her M.A. thesis.

Johannsen, Kristin L.  2002.  “Root Rustlers” [ginseng; poaching].  Mother Jones 27 (July/August): 18.

Johannsen, Kristin.  2006.  Ginseng Dreams: The Secret World of America’s Most Valuable Plant.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky. 215 pp.

Johnson, Mike, and Linda Johnson.  2012.  “Secret Hidden Away in a Valley” [Ga.].  Interview by student Emily Thurmond.  Foxfire Magazine 46, no. 1-2 (Spring/Summer): 2-10.  Rabun County grist mill, now a bed and breakfast.

Joslin, Michael.  2007.  “‘Sang Season: Digging Spirit-Frisking Ginseng” [93-year-old Joe Willis].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 23, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 57-60, and photo of ginseng laid out to dry, inside back cover.

Keller, Kenneth W.  2000.  “The Wheat Trade on the Upper Potomac, 1800-1860" [western Va.; Md.; Pa.].  In After the Backcountry: Rural Life in the Great Valley of Virginia, 1800-1900, ed. K. Koons and W. Hofstra, 21-33. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Kight, Caitlin.  2011.  “The Herbal Sage: Blending ‘Green’ Teas for Good Health, for the Environment, and for the Economy.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 1 (Summer): 42-43.  Whole Foods supplier Herbal Sage Tea Company is based in southeastern Ohio.

Kilbourne, Carl G.  2000.  “A New Sustainable Cash Crop for Mountain Farmers” [hardwood tree farming].  Appalachian Heritage 28 (Spring): 13-18.

Kingsolver, Barbara, with Steven L. Hopp and Camille Kingsolver.  Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life [local growing; sustainable agriculture; Va.].  Drawings by Richard A. Houser.  New York: HarperCollins.  370 pp.

Kingsolver, Barbara.  2003.  “Foreword.”  In The Essential Agrarian Reader: The Future of Culture, Community, and the Land, ed. N. Wirzba, ix-xvii.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Koons, Kenneth E.  2000.  “‘The Staple of Our Country’: Wheat in the Regional Farm Economy of the Nineteenth-Century Valley of Virginia” [Shenandoah Valley].  In After the Backcountry: Rural Life in the Great Valley of Virginia, 1800-1900, ed. K. Koons and W. Hofstra, 3-20. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Lafferty, Patricia Black.  2001.  “Obert Parsons: Boone County Apple Expert” [70-year-old; on planting, grafting, growing trees, and making apple butter].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 27 (Fall): 22-25.

LaLone, Mary B.  2008.  “Running the Family Farm: Accommodation and Adaptation in an Appalachian Region.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 14, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 62-98.  New River Valley of Va.; 1930s to present; oral history documentation; Census data tables.

LaLone, Mary B., Peg Wimmer, and Reva K. Spence, ed.  2003.  Appalachian Farming Life: Memories and Perspectives on Family Farming in Virginia's New River Valley [30 oral history interviews].  Radford, Va.: Brightside Press.  428 pp.

Larsen, Torben Huus.  2010.  Enduring Pastoral: Recycling the Middle Landscape Ideal in the Tennessee Valley.  Architecture, Technology, Culture (series), no. 4.  Amsterdam, Netherlands: Rodopi.  209 pp.  Contents: The Museum of Appalachia and the pastoral simulacrum | Estates, trails, and national parks: early examples of the pastoralized space | A “machine-driven Arcadia”: the TVA and the transformation of the Tennessee Valley: 1933 to 1942 | A breakdown of ideologies: the Tellico Dam and the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway | “You don’t get that authenticity at Disney!”: Dollywood, Jack Daniel’s, and the emergence of the hyper-pastoral | Beyond the hyper-pastoral: a conclusion.

Lester, Connie L.  2006.  Up from the Mudsills of Hell: The Farmers’ Alliance, Populism, and Progressive Agriculture in Tennessee, 1870-1915.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  321 pp.

Link, Doris Lucas, David Brady, and Nancy Kate Givens.  2002.  “Defending the Community: Citizen Involvement in Impact Assessment and Cultural Heritage Conservation” [Giles Co., Va.; fighting proposed power line route; cultural, genealogical attachment to place].  In Culture, Environment, and Conservation in the Appalachian South, ed. B. Howell, 137-152.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Liu, Zheng, Ron Fleming, Angelos Pagoulatos, and Wuyang Hu.  2010.  “The Supply of Private Acreage for Public Recreational Use in Southern and Central Appalachia.”  Growth and Change 41, no. 4 (December): 540-555.

Lutts, Ralph H.  2004.  “Like Manna From God: The American Chestnut Trade in Southwestern Virginia” [1900-1930; commons, blight, disappearance].  Environmental History 9 (July): 497-525.

Manget, Luke.  2012.  “Sangin’ in the Mountains: The Ginseng Economy of the Southern Appalachians, 1865-1900” [Cherokee Co., N.C.].  Appalachian Journal 40, no. 1-2 (Fall 2012/Winter 2013): 28-56.

Mannon, Anita G.  2001.  Work Horse Tales: Adventures in the Forests of Appalachia [impressions of Suffolks trained for horselogging; Va. Blue Ridge].  Philadelphia: Xlibris.  114 pp.

Marion, Jeff Daniel.  2005.  “Leaf by Leaf” [1960s memoir; measuring rural tobacco patches for the Agricultural Stabilization Control Office].  In Crossroads: A Southern Culture Annual, ed. Ted Olson, 54-66.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.

Marra, John L.  1997.  “Ben Gravely’s Garden Tractor” [story of Gravely Motor Plow and Cultivator Company, founded 1922, Dunbar, W.Va.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 23 (Summer): 26-35.

McCaig, Donald.  [2004] 2007.  A Useful Dog [seven short pieces about working sheepdogs].  Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.  80 pp.  Originally published: Carrollton, Oh.: Press on Scroll Road.

McDaniel, Lynda.  2001.  “Growing for the Future: Appalachian Harvest” [Va.; Appalachian Sustainable Development; organic, value-added fruits, vegetables; forestry].  Appalachia: Journal of the Appalachian Regional Commission 34 (September-December): 10-17.

McNeil, Robert B.  2005.  “Old Deeds Tell a New Story” [18th- and 19th-century plats of Blacksburg, Va. compared].  Smithfield Review: Studies in the History of the Region West of the Blue Ridge 9: 43-54.

Miller, Char.  2012.  “Neither Crooked Nor Shady: The Weeks Act, Theodore Roosevelt, and the Virtue of Eastern National Forests, 1899-1911.”  Theodore Roosevelt Association Journal 33, no. 4 (Fall): 15-24.

Miller, Daniel.  2008.  “Using AquacultureAsa Post-Mining Land Use in West Virginia.”  Mine Water and the Environment 27, no. 2: 122-126

Miller, E. Willard.  2000.  “The Evolution of Rural Villages in Western Pennsylvania.”  In A Geographic Perspective of Pittsburgh and the Alleghenies: From Precambrian to Post-Industrial, ed. K. Patrick and J. Scarpaci, 125-132. Washington, D.C.: Association of American Geographers.

Millimet, Lisa Gray.  1997.  “‘All They Knew Was Pull and Get It’: Daniel Richmond About Then and Now” [interview; training draft steer; homesteading in Raleigh Co.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 23 (Summer): 10-17.

Milnes, Gerald.  [1984] 1999.  “‘Boy, That Was a Fine Bean!’: A Harvesttime Interview with an Old-Fashioned Gardener” [Ruby Morris, Braxton Co.; heirloom vegetables].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 25 (Fall): 10-17.  Reprint, originally published vol. 10, no. 3.

Milnes, Gerald.  [1984] 1999.  “Seed Saving” [heirloom vegetables].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 25 (Fall): 18-20.  Reprint, originally published: vol. 10, no. 3.

Minick, Jim.  2005.  “A Citizen and a Native: An Interview with Wendell Berry.”  Nantahala: A Review of Writing and Photography in Appalachia 3, no. 1 (Winter). Online at http://nantahalareview.org/issue3-1/view/Minick.htm.  Reprinted from Appalachian Journal 31, no. 3-4: 300-313.

Minick, Jim.  2007.  “Looking for Land” [Wythe Co., Va.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 23, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 29-31.

Minick, Jim.  2009.  “New Religion” [Va., berry farm; growing “organic”].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 25, no.1 (Spring/Summer): 87-88.

Minick, Jim.  2010.  “Affinity.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 26, no. 1 (Summer): 33-34.  Excerpt from The Blueberry Years: A Memoir of Farm and Family (Thomas Dunne, 2010).

Minick, Jim.  2010.  The Blueberry Years: A Memoir of Farm and Family [b. 1964].  New York: Thomas Dunne Books.  352 pp.  Personal narrative of organic, pick-your-own blueberry farm challenges and blessings, Floyd Co., Va.

Morrison, Charles M.  2010.  “I Remember Chickens.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 36, no. 1 (Spring): 18-23.  Raising chickens on a 1950s Upshur Co. farm.  Sidebar: “A Horse Called Fred,” by Hobart Everson, 24-25 [1930s trick horse; horse drawn farming; Barbour Co.].

Mt. Pleasant, Jane.  1998.  “The Three Sisters” [Native-American cropping systems in Appalachian N.Y.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 25 (Spring): 26-29.

Napton, Darrell, Terry L. Sohl, and Roger F. Auch.  2003.  “Land Use and Land Cover Change in the North Central Appalachians Ecoregion” [northern Pa., southern N.Y.].  Pennsylvania Geographer 41 (Fall/Winter): 46-66.

Nava, Margaret M.  2010.  “City Slickers.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 26, no. 1 (Summer): 30-31.  Gardening trials of first-year homesteaders in 1978 W.Va.

Nickens, T. Edward.  2001.  “Catching Bandits in the Smokies” [ginseng poachers].  National Wildlife 39 (February/March): 34-39.

Nolt, John.  2001.  “Living Sustainably Appalachian Style” [East Tenn. family].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 18 (Winter): 3-6.

Olsen, Marty.  2008.  “Shadows of the Past.”  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 34, no. 2 (Summer): 50-57.  Short photo essay of family farms in Lewis and Gilmer Counties.

Parsonsk, Rachel.  2012.  “‘Eat What You Are’: Community-Supported Agriculture at Oakwyn Farms” [southern W.Va.].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 2 (Winter): 52-53.

Perez, Karni R.  2006.  Fishing for Gold: The Story of Alabama’s Catfish Industry.  Fire Ant Books.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.  263 pp.

Peterson, Ronan K.  1995.  “Sanging in Poplar, North Carolina: Zelotes Peterson, Ginseng Hunter.”  North Carolina Folklore Journal 42 (Winter-Spring): 53-61.

Pritts, Kim Derek.  1996.  Ginseng: How to Find, Grow, and Use America's Forest Gold.  Mechanicsburg, Pa.: Stackpole Books.  160 pp.

Prunty, Merle C.  [1961] 2010.  “Idle Rural Land Phenomena in Madison County, Georgia.”  Southeastern Geographer 50, no. 1 (Spring): 5-14.  Article reprinted for the journal’s 50th anniversary (originally published, 1: 39-49), followed by “Commentary,” by John Fraser Hart, 15-16.

Ramey, David.  2009.  “Lessons from an Appalachian Stockyard: Coal Served as Dietary Supplement for Pigs.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 25, no.1 (Spring/Summer): 42-44.

Rasmussen, Barbara.  1994.  Absentee Landowning and Exploitation in  West Virginia, 1760-1920.  Lexington: University Press of  Kentucky.  222 pp.

Ray, Janisse.  2012.  The Seed Underground: A Growing Revolution to Save Food.  White River Junction, Vt.: Chelsea Green.  217 pp.  Heirloom seed saving and swapping.  Ray is author of Ecology of a Cracker Childhood (1999).

Roberts, Katherine.  2009.  “Sunday Dinner in Ritchie County” [preparation; produce; family farm].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 35, no. 3 (Fall): 26-33.

Rotenstein, David S.  2010.  “Model for the Nation: $ale, Slaughter, and Processing at the East Liberty Stockyards” [1870s-90s; Pittsburgh].  Pennsylvania History 93, no. 4 (Winter 2010-11): 36-47.

Salatin, Joel.  2009.  “‘Anything Worth Doing...’: An Interview with Joel Salatin,” by Anne E. Chesky.  Appalachian Journal 36, no. 3/4 (Spring/Summer): 228-241.  Sustainable farming in Swoope, Va.  Salatin “defends local food systems, small farms, and a farmer’s right to work outside of the conventional food production system.”

Salstrom, Paul.  2003.  “The Neonatives: Back-to-the-Land in Appalachia’s 1970’s.”  Appalachian Journal 30 (Summer): 308-323.

Salstrom, Paul.  2007.  From Pioneering to Persevering: Family Farming in Indiana to 1880.  West Lafayette, Ind.: Purdue University Press.  208 pp.  Relationships with Ky., Ohio Valley, and Ill.

Shambaugh, Helen Bradfield.  2001.  “Apple Butter Time” [local history how-to; Morgan Co.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 27 (Fall): 26-29.

Smith, Barbara.  2011.  “Randolph County Cattleman, Herman Isner” [92 years old; memoir].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 37, no. 1 (Spring): 22-29.

Smith, Kimberly K.  2003.  Wendell Berry and the Agrarian Tradition: A Common Grace.  American Political Thought.  Lawrence: University Press of Kansas.  270 pp.

Smith, R. T.  2006.  “Singing ‘Sang” [Editor’s Note; on ginseng].  Shenandoah: The Washington and Lee University Review 56, no. 3 (Winter): 197-202.

Spears, James.  1996.  “Of Mules and Men” [all about mules; bibliography].  Special issue, Tennessee Folklore Society Bulletin 58, no. 1: 1-45.

Stout, Lee.  2009.  Ice Cream U: The Story of the Nation’s Most Successful Collegiate Creamery. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Libraries.  63 pp.  History of Penn State’s Creamery and its role in the growth of the state’s dairy business.

Strom, Claire.  2009.  Making Catfish Bait Out of Government Boys: The Fight against Cattle Ticks and the Transformation of the Yeoman South.  Athens: University of Georgia Press.  297 pp.  Federal tick eradication program begun in 1906 and the economic struggle and violent resistance it engendered.

Stroud, Hubert B.  2007.  “Problems Associated with Amenity-Based Subdivisions in the Poconos: The Case of Pike County, Pennsylvania” [rapid growth; a “suburb of the suburbs” of metro N.Y. and N.J.].  Pennsylvania Geographer 45, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 66-79.

Stryk, Suzanne.  2005.  “Tobacco” [artist’s reflections; Cozart Warehouse, Abingdon, Va.].  In Crossroads: A Southern Culture Annual, ed. Ted Olson, 50-53.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.

Stutler, Judith.  1997.  “Randolph County Horsepower” [environmentally friendly  logging with Percheron draft horses].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 23 (Summer): 18-19.

Sultana, Selima, and Joe Weber.  2007.  “Journey-to-Work Patterns in the Age of Sprawl: Evidence from Two Midsize Southern Metropolitan Areas.” [Birmingham and Tuscaloosa, Ala.].  Professional Geographer 59, no. 2 (May): 193-208.

Taylor, David A.  2006.  Ginseng, The Divine Root.  Chapel Hill, N.C.: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill.  308 pp.

Taylor, David.  2002.  “Getting to the Root of Ginseng” [W.Va.; health aspects].  Smithsonian 33 (July): 98-102.

Tevis, Jamie Griggs.  2001.  “Tobacco” [reminiscences of cash crop tending; Ky.].  Appalachian Heritage 29 (Winter): 12-15.

Thomas, Sarah.  2008.  “Vitis Appalachia.”  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 24, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 12-16.  Wineries in W.Va., Ky., Va., N.C., and Tenn.

Towers, George.  2010.  “Rediscovering Rural Appalachian Communities with Historical GIS” [Summers County, W.Va.].  Southeastern Geographer 50, no. 1 (Spring): 58-82.

Towers, George.  2011.  “Cultural Dasymetric Population Mapping with Historical GIS: A Case Study from the Southern Appalachians.”  International Journal of Applied Geospatial Research 2, no. 4 (October-December): 38-56.

Trachtman, Paul.  2005.  “Wendell Berry” [profile of the farmer/poet; farming issues].  Smithsonian 36, no. 8 (November): 54-55.

Van Willigen, John, and Anne van Willigen.  2006.  Food and Everyday Life on Kentucky Family Farms, 1920-1950 [FSA photographs].  Kentucky Remembered: An Oral History Series.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  260 pp.

Van Willigen, John, and Susan C. Eastwood. 1998.  Tobacco Culture: Farming Kentucky’s Burley Belt [Central Ky.; production steps, from oral histories].  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  213 pp.

Veteto, James R., et al., ed.  2011.  Place-Based Foods of Appalachia: From Rarity to Community Restoration and Market Recovery.  College Park, Md.: Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE), and Renewing America’s Food Traditions (RAFT).  34 pp.  “The first-ever report of the status of 1,412 place-based heirloom foods in central and southern Appalachia,” including lists of those varieties, their heirloom names, rarity, and geographic states.  Contents: Apple-achia: the most diverse foodshed in the US, Canada and northern Mexico / James R. Veteto --  The serendipitous saga of rescuing the noble bean / Bill Best -- Preserving the wild mountain Muscadines of Madison County [N.C.] / Chuck Blethen --  Nancy Hall [heirloom sweet potato variety]: respected elder boards the Ark / Doug Elliott -- Squeezing spitters and pippins: Foggy Ridge Cider, Dugspur, Virginia / Fred Sauceman -- Saving the past for the future: heirloom corns of Appalachia / Ira Wallace -- Wild spring greens keep the Cherokee connected to the Earth / Kevin Welch -- The best apple in the world can live in our memories and in our orchards [Virginia Beauty] / Ron Joyner --  Tom Brown’s quest to save apples from extinction / Tom Brown -- Way down yonder [paw paws] / Doug Elliott.  http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Project-Products/Southern-SARE-Project-Products/Place-Based-Foods-of-Appalachia.

Veteto, James.  2008.  “The History and Survival of Traditional Heirloom Vegetable Varieties in the Southern Appalachian Mountains of Western North Carolina.”  Agriculture and Human Values 25, no. 1 (January): 121-134.  More than 134 varieties still being grown.

Walker, Melissa.  1998.  “Farm Wives and Commercial Farming: The Case of Loudon County, Tennessee.”  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 57 (Spring/Summer): 42-61.

Walker, Melissa.  2000.  “Culling the Men Out from the Boys: Concepts of Success in the Recollections of a Southern Farmer” [Depression-era Blount Co., Tenn.].  Oral History Review 27 (Summer/Fall): 1-18.

Walker, Melissa.  2006.  Southern Farmers and Their Stories: Memory and Meaning in Oral History [from 475 interviews with 531 people in 14 Southern states].  New Directions in Southern History.  Lexington, Ky.: University Press of Kentucky.  324 pp.

Walker, Mike.  2006.  “Raising Calves in Monroe County” [Pickaway, W.Va.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 32, no. 1 (Spring): 44-49.  Sidebar by Gene Bailey, “Grandma and the Gentleman” [i.e., bull, kept for breeding neighbors’ cows during the 1930s and 40s for needed extra income, 50-51].

Ware, Mark D.  2006.  Spotza, Keelers, and Stirred Sugar [maple sugaring history]. Somerset, Pa.: Historical and Genealogical Society of Somerset County.  150 pp.

Warren, Sarah T.  2005.  “ Public Interests in Private Property: Conflicts Over Wood Chip Mills in North Carolina” [forest policy; resource exploitation].  Southern Rural Sociology 19, no. 2: 114-131.

Way, Albert.  2004.  “‘A World Properly Put Together’: Environmental Knowledge in Charles Frazier’s Cold Mountain” [novel, 1997; film, 2003].  Southern Cultures 10, no. 4 (Winter): 33-54.

Whaley, Abe.  2005.  “Once Unique, Soon a Place Like Any Other” [unregulated single-family housing construction on East Tenn. mountain tops].  Newsweek, 14 November, 13.

Wheelock, Perry Carpenter.  2007.  Farming Along the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, 1828-1971: A Study of Agricultural Sites in the C&O Canal National Historical Park [Western Md.].  Hagerstown, Md.: U.S. Dept. of Interior, National Park Service, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park.  121 pp.

Whitcomb, Robert, and Judith Whitcomb. 1998.  “Mountain Cattle Drives” [1940s-50s Randolph Co.].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 24 (Summer): 48-50.

White, John.  2003.  “Early Life on the Nuzum Dairy Farm” [interview with Pauline Nuzum Burns, b. 1904; Harrison Co. family dairy].  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 29 (Spring): 38-43.

Wildsmith, Dana.  2010.  Back to Abnormal: Surviving with an Old Farm in the New South [essays; Barrow Co., Ga.].  Foreword by Fred Chappell.  Louisville, Ky.: MotesBooks.  167 pp.

Williams, Charles E.  2008.  “A Comparative Survey and Review of Agricultural Use of Post-Mining Landscapes in Pennsylvania and the Appalachian Region.”  Pennsylvania Geographer 46, no. 2 (Fall/Winter): 22-45.

Wirtz, Ann Greenleaf.  2010.  The Henderson County Curb Market: A Blue Ridge Heritage Since 1924.  Boone, N.C.: Parkway Publishers.  172 pp.  Farmers market, Hendersonville, N.C.; profiles of vendors.

Wirzba, Norman, ed.  2003.  The Essential Agrarian Reader: The Future of Culture, Community, and the Land.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  276 pp.  Fifteen essays, several celebrating the 25th anniversary of the publication of Wendell Berry’s The Unsettling of America (Sierra Club Books, 1977).

Woodside, Jane Harris.  2001.  “Planting a New Industry in the North Carolina Mountains” [Graham Co.; using native plants, wildcrafting, as economic development strategy].  Now and Then: The Appalachian Magazine 18 (Winter): 7-10.

Wotring, Keith.  2008.  “Water Witching in Preston County: A Visit with Keith Wotring” [b. 1926].  Interview by Donetta Sisler.  Goldenseal: West Virginia Traditional Life 34, no. 1 (Spring): 54-59.

Yarnell, Susan L.  1998.  The Southern Appalachians: A History of the Landscape [prehistory to 20th century].  General Technical Report SRS, no. 18.  Asheville, N.C.: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station.  45 pp.  http://www.srs.fs.fed.us/pubs/viewpub.jsp?index=331.